#1
Alright, here's the thing. I've been writing out my intervals for different keys of the major scale (Just the natural notes, A-G). I noticed that whenever I write out the notes from the minor second, maj second, sharp sec, all the way up to the octave, that all the notes for the second degree are the same letter with different accents. (Someone correct my spelling on that if I'm wrong xD). So far I have done G, F, C, and D all the way from root to octave. The other ones, A, B, and E have just the major intervals in, hence the major scale. This has been going great because this stuff is actually making sense, and I've tried reading through it before and I was lost. So I'm happy with the progress, but I've stumbled across a problem. When I try to write out the Minor, Major, and Sharp second for the E Major, I get this..

Minor Second: Fb. Major: F#. Sharp: ?? Does it go to G? Or rather, how do you write out that note? F##? I was so happy because I saw a pattern with the intervals, thinking I would never be able to remember an F#Dim7, then thought I had an easy way to get to it fast. If you knew the fifths, it's not very hard to figure out what letter (Note) is in the seventh interval, you just go up two letters, then accent it properly. Am I understanding this right? Or is the pattern simply a fluke with the keys I've already completed? DO you actually expresss a Sharp Second in the key of E as F##?

Thanks in advance, the answers very easy and I'm sure a bunch of you know it but... I don't unfortunately. :'(
Quote by rocknrollgod
well i can tall you this much do NOT get a marshall MG. becasue you will blow the speaker with duncans in the guitar. i know for experience.


Quote by Gutch220
Leave it to UGer's to argue over who "owns" a language


#2
Yes, you are correct F## would be the right way to express a sharp second with respect to E. I think the term 'augmented second' would be used instead of 'sharp second' though.

It is more common to see 'flat third' instead of 'sharp second.' In that case it would be a G. Even though its enharmonic with F##.

The music notation symbol for double sharp looks like an "x".
#3
Oh yeah, I knew that X thing... it just slipped out of my memory for a bit. ><

So, in order from "least" to "greatest", intervals move like this?

Diminished, Flat, Minor, Major, Sharp, Augmented?

EDIT: Leaving my original message in tact.

Nevermind, I looked at the chart I was making and noticed that it should go Dim, Min, Maj, Sharp, Aug. Is this correct?

I've seen a Dim7 expressed as bb7, and m7 expressed as b7. So what would you express a "Flat 7" as? Does a flat interval not exist? (I mean, technically it kind of does, but I've never heard/read about that term, and judging by the terms I have here, a flat interval isn't a proper name for it, but rather, diminished).

So what I'm thinking is after a Dim interval, comes the Minor, which people might consider "Flat". Is this correct?
Quote by rocknrollgod
well i can tall you this much do NOT get a marshall MG. becasue you will blow the speaker with duncans in the guitar. i know for experience.


Quote by Gutch220
Leave it to UGer's to argue over who "owns" a language


Last edited by sg-rocker173 at Oct 3, 2007,
#4
Quote by sg-rocker173
Minor Second: Fb. Major: F#. Sharp: ?? Does it go to G? Or rather, how do you write out that note? F##?

To complicate things further, the minor 2nd of E is F natural, not Fb.


E - Root
F - mi2
F# - Maj2
G - mi3
G# - Maj3
A - P4
A#/Bb - Augmented 4th/Diminished 5th
B - P5
[etc ...]
#5
Quote by sg-rocker173
I've seen a Dim7 expressed as bb7, and m7 expressed as b7.

The full diminished chord works on diminishing all the intervals.

dim7:

R b3 b5 bb7
C Eb Gb Bbb

The half diminished (or m7b5) only diminishes two of these intervals.

R b3 b5 b7
C Eb Gb Bb

It works on the basis that only a half-diminished chord can be diatonic. A full diminished chord is built on m3 intervals, so will always create dischord in a diatonic piece.
#6
Quote by sg-rocker173
Nevermind, I looked at the chart I was making and noticed that it should go Dim, Min, Maj, Sharp, Aug. Is this correct?


No...as far as I know, Sharp and Aug are the same thing. But most people would use the term "augmented" instead of "sharp". I think most would understand if you said "sharp second" but the correct term would be "augmented second."

Check out this page...the last table on the bottom explains the rules for naming intervals:
http://www.smu.edu/totw/interval.htm