#1
Let's say I'm jamming on my acoustic guitar and I found myself a good chord progression. But I don't want a folk song, I wanna rock! So I grab my electric and turn on the distortion... But then what?

What would I do with this simple chord progression to make a good rock song out of it? (good be something like radiohead or muse would do, or even hard rock like gn'r).

Don't say "make everything into powerchords and play that with distortion dude", I can think of that myself

And now we're on it, could you make a metal song out of a chord progression, and how?
#2
palm mute were required but keep the same beat or double time it. thats your key. for metal add liberal amounts of gain, remove the mid-range and cover in bass and trebs.
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#3
Perhaps use the all-classic power chords technique, but add passing tones between each chord. Basically create a riff within the chords; something to use as a motif for the rest of the song.
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#4
yea u could. do that. I think u could do distorted Barre chords and not power chords, just so u can get majors as well as minors. Power chords are all mostly majors. Or u could do the acoustic chords clean and then turn on the gain for the chorus and other parts.

Btw, theres a video on here about this kinda thing. just posted recently too.
#5
Quote by qotsa1998

Btw, theres a video on here about this kinda thing. just posted recently too.


Yeah I know. And I thought that it would answer my questions, but I didn't find it all that great. Hence this post, see if you musical geniouses could add a little to what that guy says.
#6
The tonic dominant relationship, aka the I-V is always a good base to build round for solid sounding rock stuff.
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#7
Quote by qotsa1998
yea u could. do that. I think u could do distorted Barre chords and not power chords, just so u can get majors as well as minors. Power chords are all mostly majors. Or u could do the acoustic chords clean and then turn on the gain for the chorus and other parts.

Btw, theres a video on here about this kinda thing. just posted recently too.



Power chords aren't major or minor. they're just root and fifth

As far as making a chord progression sound rock, you could arpeggiate the full chords on a clean guitar and get a friend to play the distorted power chords over it. or u could just record the 2 tracks yourself.
Last edited by frankieD2989 at Oct 3, 2007,
#8
I think a lot of what makes something 'rock' is the rhythm. Think about rests, syncopation, staccato. Try to create 'space' in the riff/chord progression. I recently read an article on Malcom Young (the guy knows how to make a chord progression rock), and he was fond of 'avoiding the one'. That is, dont play anything on the first beat of the bar.
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#9
Now that we've got the rock portion covered...

To make a progression more..."metal," what you'll want to do is make the chords second inversion. Since you don't want just strictly powerchords, you could add the third an octave higher than it normally would, thus making it a 10th I believe? Please do correct me if I'm wrong.