#1
I was wondering about why did the old fender basses became rare and so expansive..... does anybody knows it? What about the basses from today, will they get a special value in 40 years? (maybe my american deluxe hoho)
Just wondering....
#2
It's the same reason why 40-year-old Gibson Les Paul guitars fetch prices in the multiple thousands. Very few instruments made recently can match the quality and craftsmanship of the older ones, and then there's just the fact that they're old relics of a bygone era which was the birthplace for many now-legends in popular music.

And for the second part, yes, possibly. There's quite a fair chance that if your instrument is any kind of special variant (especially one that is now out of production) and is kept in good condition, there's a good chance that one day it'll be worth quite a lot. I doubt any instrument made in the last ten years is going to ever be worth as much as instruments made in the late 50's, 60's and early 70's, but it probably will go up in value eventually so long as you don't scuff it up a ton and it's not just some generic mexican-made no-name brand lump of plywood.
#3
fender has generally all round declined in quality since the sixties.
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#4
Quote by bokuho
It's the same reason why 40-year-old Gibson Les Paul guitars fetch prices in the multiple thousands. Very few instruments made recently can match the quality and craftsmanship of the older ones, and then there's just the fact that they're old relics of a bygone era which was the birthplace for many now-legends in popular music.

And for the second part, yes, possibly. There's quite a fair chance that if your instrument is any kind of special variant (especially one that is now out of production) and is kept in good condition, there's a good chance that one day it'll be worth quite a lot. I doubt any instrument made in the last ten years is going to ever be worth as much as instruments made in the late 50's, 60's and early 70's, but it probably will go up in value eventually so long as you don't scuff it up a ton and it's not just some generic mexican-made no-name brand lump of plywood.



Well i think it is a good explanation =).
#5
Quote by FunkasPuck
fender has generally all round declined in quality since the sixties.


But if their declination continues then in the next sixty years they will be horrible and mine will be worth a fortune!. Yes... Yes... I'll give it to my children on the stipulation they take it into the antiques roadshow! This plan is perfect.
#6
Quote by Daniel333
I was wondering about why did the old fender basses became rare and so expansive..... does anybody knows it? What about the basses from today, will they get a special value in 40 years? (maybe my american deluxe hoho)
Just wondering....

Firstly you must appreciate that there were less top of the range Basses/guitars produced way back when, a very high percentage have been snapped up by collectors so few are available today.
Yes the quality did drop originaly when CBS took over as did the quality of Fender amps and cabs reagarding materials used.
Having owned a 1965 Jazz Bass as well as two recent models I can say from experience that there is definately a difference in feel coming out in favour of the old.
Due to quantities produce I can't really see todays models reaching the same value as the older (especialy pre CBS) models.
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#7
Quote by John Swift
Firstly you must appreciate that there were less top of the range Basses/guitars produced way back when, a very high percentage have been snapped up by collectors so few are available today.
Yes the quality did drop originaly when CBS took over as did the quality of Fender amps and cabs reagarding materials used.
Having owned a 1965 Jazz Bass as well as two recent models I can say from experience that there is definately a difference in feel coming out in favour of the old.
Due to quantities produce I can't really see todays models reaching the same value as the older (especialy pre CBS) models.



I dont know.... about the rare models of today maybe mine its one of them because of the tunners.... they say that it is original but they have never seen them in that bass before... hmm... but it can also be because the bass its really new =)
#8
Quote by Daniel333
I dont know.... about the rare models of today maybe mine its one of them because of the tunners.... they say that it is original but they have never seen them in that bass before... hmm... but it can also be because the bass its really new =)

Yeah, they switched right handed 4-string MIA DX bass tuners to Hipshots.

But production line Fenders will not be anywhere near the value of the vintage ones. Nor will any poly coated instrument. There's no mistake why a 1964 Strat costs well over twice the price of a late 1969 Strat.
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#9
Question:

Note, I've never played a vintage Fender. But, wouldn't advancements in technology make an instrument made today play, sound, and feel much better than an instrument made 40 years ago?

Like, if I bought a 70s Mustang, and then bought a 2007 Mustang, wouldn't the new car run better and more efficient than the 70s Mustang, even if the old model is timeless. Is the novelty of having a vintage Fender bass the same type of novelty you get from owning a really old car?
#10
Cars are made of metal, and instruments are made of wood. One thing that draws people to pre-CBS Fenders besides their workmanship and nitro finish is the type of wood they used. Brazillian rosewood is endangered now and modern 'accelerated growth' woods and fertilizers means our basses don't sound as good as pre-CBS ones. Older wood is much, much better, and wood gets better as it ages. Poly finishes choke the wood, so time doesn't have much of an effect on the wood like nitro finish would (and this is good and bad).

Also, nitro finishes are fragile and are very hard to keep mint. This adds a degree of difficulty in keeping it original or in good shape making mint ones even more rare.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#11
Its mainly a question of craftsmanship (they didnt make as many guitars back then, therefore each one was better quality) and the more important fact that the wood sounds better with age. Like, I had a double bass teacher who had a bass with a 300 year old body, it sounded AMAZING.
#12
Quote by bokuho
And for the second part, yes, possibly. There's quite a fair chance that if your instrument is any kind of special variant (especially one that is now out of production) and is kept in good condition, there's a good chance that one day it'll be worth quite a lot. I doubt any instrument made in the last ten years is going to ever be worth as much as instruments made in the late 50's, 60's and early 70's, but it probably will go up in value eventually so long as you don't scuff it up a ton and it's not just some generic mexican-made no-name brand lump of plywood.

I seriously doubt that a 50th anniversary jazz bass will become a sought after bass in the league of the old ones for a couple of reasons. Firstly everyone is putting them away as collectables, making them really quite common and thus lowering values. Secondly the originals are worth so much because the were revolutionary legends, A 50th anniversary fender is not.
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#13
Quote by BlueShox
Question:

Note, I've never played a vintage Fender. But, wouldn't advancements in technology make an instrument made today play, sound, and feel much better than an instrument made 40 years ago?

Like, if I bought a 70s Mustang, and then bought a 2007 Mustang, wouldn't the new car run better and more efficient than the 70s Mustang, even if the old model is timeless. Is the novelty of having a vintage Fender bass the same type of novelty you get from owning a really old car?

Very true regarding cars but we're talking about craft here, old Fenders were made up of seasond timber, modern technology can shorten this period to virtualy zero time but its the same as battery fed/reared poultry and free range, there is a differnce in taste just as there is a difference in feel and sound with an instrument made from naturaly matured/seasond wood.
It is true electronics have come a long way since the 60s but that is another matter.
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#14
I know thefitz disagrees with me on this point, I believe that the nostalgia aspect plays a part in the super inflation on Fender basses. This will help to explain (as I predict) that the '00 models, i.e. one's made today will not increase in value, rather hold their value in line with inflation.

Here's a story. I know of a bassist who was asked to trade his Ibanez Musicman for a Musicman Stingray. Crazy as eBay prices are around £350-£650 respectively. Why would someone want to do that? He said, he played one in the 80's, and sold it. He wanted one, but couldn't find one until then.

That's why CBS 70's Fenders are rising in value above inflation, even though the quality of them is quite poor. I have owned 2 late CBS era Precisions. I can vouch for that. People who were young then, are middle aged now and middle classed (generalisation I know!). But they are willing to pay top dollar to indulge in nostalgia and emulate their heroes, as there are limited specimens around.


So in conculsion, yes the quality issue is a major part of why Fenders gain value at crazy prices. But due to the nostalgia associated with these time periods, and we probably won't see stuff like that for today. It is my belief that modern Fenders will not go superinflated.
#16
the crazy prices of old instruments is driven by non-playing collectors. like the old
Gibson Les Pauls, and Fender Strats. pre CBS is better, but is it $20,000 better than new? hell no!! it is a false market pushed to extremes by people with more money, than good sense. i've played vintage Fender basses, and they are nice. but there ain't no way i would give $8,000 for one. for that kind of money i would have Fender Custom Shop build me one. it's kind of like Harley-Davidson motorcycles. are they worth the money? Hell No! but idiots still buy them for twice what their worth.
as mentioned above, the prices are market driven.
Last edited by 83lespaulstudio at Oct 6, 2007,
#17
speaking of pricey basses... anyone think my gibson is worth a lot? (check profile) My dad gave it to me and he's had it for like 20 years so idk
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#18
a Gibson EB-3 i think? prolly at least $1500
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#19
k sweet thanks
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Originally posted by Civildp1
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#20
Quote by 83lespaulstudio
the crazy prices of old instruments is driven by non-playing collectors.


So true and such a shame. There should be a law where you have to prove you're actually a musician before you're allowed to purchase a vintage instrument. Those things were designed to be played, damn it, not gather dust in some Japanese businessmans luxury Tokyo apartment.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#21
Quote by Caustic
So true and such a shame. There should be a law where you have to prove you're actually a musician before you're allowed to purchase a vintage instrument. Those things were designed to be played, damn it, not gather dust in some Japanese businessmans luxury Tokyo apartment.

i agree 100%
it's pretty common for a concert violinist to be playing a $100,000 Stratovarius(sp)
that is on loan to him by the owner/collector, or museum. instruments were built to be played. we should start a political action group. lol
#22
we should some spoiled brat i know got a 62 precision for his bday and he cant even play
#23
Quote by Edgeless
we should some spoiled brat i know got a 62 precision for his bday and he cant even play

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#24
Quote by 83lespaulstudio
the crazy prices of old instruments is driven by non-playing collectors. like the old
Gibson Les Pauls, and Fender Strats. pre CBS is better, but is it $20,000 better than new? hell no!! it is a false market pushed to extremes by people with more money, than good sense. i've played vintage Fender basses, and they are nice. but there ain't no way i would give $8,000 for one. for that kind of money i would have Fender Custom Shop build me one. it's kind of like Harley-Davidson motorcycles. are they worth the money? Hell No! but idiots still buy them for twice what their worth.
as mentioned above, the prices are market driven.

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Quote by thefitz
But hold on - you're debating on whether or not to buy a bass or keep your house? That's pretty fucking hardcore!
#25
Quote by MattPerson911
speaking of pricey basses... anyone think my gibson is worth a lot? (check profile) My dad gave it to me and he's had it for like 20 years so idk

It's left handed isn't it? it appears to be a later model as the neck pickup on the early EB3s was up against the end of the neck.
I won't be in the same value bracket as the Fenders or early EB3s.
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300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
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#26
Quote by John Swift
It's left handed isn't it? it appears to be a later model as the neck pickup on the early EB3s was up against the end of the neck.
I won't be in the same value bracket as the Fenders or early EB3s.

That EB-x pickup at the bass of the neck... *shudders*
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#27
Quote by thefitz
That EB-x pickup at the bass of the neck... *shudders*


Yeh that's what you did shudder with the old Goodmans Audio 90 18" speakers, they moved the pickup further down the body to make it less muddy, not that it worked all that well because in reality they very poor compared to Fenders.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#28
just as a comparison.
Gibson EB-3 Bass
1961- 1979.
1961- 1965- $1,800 to $2,000

Fender Jazz Bass
1960- 1981 MIA, ('82 was when the MIJ's started)
1961- $13,000 to $19,000 (depending on the color)
1965- $6,500 to $13,000 (color)

a small inication of popularity, which is usually a good indicator of sound, and quality.


certain colors were produced in fewer numbers, therefor making them, more rare.
Last edited by 83lespaulstudio at Oct 7, 2007,