#1
can someone explain to me the differences between flamenco guitars and classical guitars?
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#2
the way that it's played i think? kinda of like whats the difference between a violin and a fiddle. same instrument but played differently
#3
Quote by RedSox_o4
the way that it's played i think? kinda of like whats the difference between a violin and a fiddle. same instrument but played differently


If that were true then why would guitars be classified as a classical, and a flamenco guitar? They are both nylon strings, so I don't really know the difference myself.
#4
yes i know that there a different techniques in flamenco than classical but im purely talking about the instrument, not the way its played
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#6
ah that thread answered some questions, so now... anyone recommend a good cheap (cause ive seen a lot that are like 3000 bucks) flamenco guitar?
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#7
Let's just say that lower-ended flamencos don't exactly come very close to the bite and growl of an ideal instrument. My full-solid Alhambra 7Fc blanca is no exception. It's sadly more of a classical guitar with shorter sustain and a trebly tone, not much growl in the tone.
#8
Something tells me that you can do the same thing on a classical or a flamenco guitar.
#9
Quote by JakeTKD86
Something tells me that you can do the same thing on a classical or a flamenco guitar.


or an ovation but that won't mean it will sound good
#10
Good one Nick_ LOL!

Same thing on a classical? Rather obvious that not everyone realises the HUGE difference. Psst I can play classical on my strat with distortion too.
#11
jake, sure you CAN do the same things, but they wont sound genuine
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#12
Hmmm my Alamansa is a flamenco guitar.... Cedar top, it cost me 600AUD w hardcase, id recomend it......
Frank Zappa's not dead. He just smells funny.
#13
I've played flamenco guitars. They are thinner, and the action is lower to give it that very raw and tough sound. They are usually of lighter color because they generally don't use the same wood that many Classical guitars use. The wood is generally thinner as well. Flamenco guitars aren't as heavy as classical guitars.
#14
i see, btw ive watched many of your videos on youtube you are very good =D i envy your "etude no. 1" by villa lobos i cant play that song too well
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#15
Thanks. It took quite a bit of practice for me to get the right hand technique down. That piece took me much more time to learn than others.
#16
yeah my fingers keep slightly touching the other strings making the notes not sound blach
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#17
Quote by The Madcap
Thanks. It took quite a bit of practice for me to get the right hand technique down. That piece took me much more time to learn than others.


Just checked out your version of Asturias, preety darn good.... Haha is it filmed in your bathroom???
Frank Zappa's not dead. He just smells funny.
#22
Quote by chris820
wow every1 ****in fails here





Am I the only one that sees the irony in this comment?


And Dreadnought, flamenco is the ONLY way. . I've never played a flamenco guitar, I wish I had access to one, just to get a feel for the difference.
#23
ya flamenco is how its played. flamenco is one of the hardest musics out there to play. lots of finger picking and techniques. But just so you know if you want to get into flamenco music you need to be spanish. since they never really wrote flamenco music. i learned mine from my grandma. it just helps get the traditional sound down IMO
#24
Rofl at needing to be Spanish, it's just like saying all jazz music stores are black only.
Last edited by confusius at Oct 6, 2007,
#25
Quote by bWsWwrestler
ya flamenco is how its played. flamenco is one of the hardest musics out there to play. lots of finger picking and techniques. But just so you know if you want to get into flamenco music you need to be spanish. since they never really wrote flamenco music. i learned mine from my grandma. it just helps get the traditional sound down IMO

There are flamenco teachers all over the world. . .
Quote by Chikitty_China
Good lord. You are amazing.



Quote by Jestersage
It's stereo amp, and I don't think it's tube. However, for a stereo amp, it is very good. Don't plug guitar into it; just use it as hi-fi if it works.
#27
Need to be Spanish? You'd probably realise that flamenco isn't the music/culture of ALL Spaniards, just a sub-culture within the country. In fact, many Spanish speaking people couldn't even understand flamenco cante letras.

I recently performed some solea falsetas for a native Spanish professor and she didn't realise the difference between Spanish music and flamenco. LOL!
#28
Quote by imLoUsY
Need to be Spanish? You'd probably realise that flamenco isn't the music/culture of ALL Spaniards, just a sub-culture within the country. In fact, many Spanish speaking people couldn't even understand flamenco cante letras.

I recently performed some solea falsetas for a native Spanish professor and she didn't realise the difference between Spanish music and flamenco. LOL!


Like I would?
My God, it's full of stars!
#30
Quote by bWsWwrestler
ya flamenco is how its played. flamenco is one of the hardest musics out there to play. lots of finger picking and techniques. But just so you know if you want to get into flamenco music you need to be spanish. since they never really wrote flamenco music. i learned mine from my grandma. it just helps get the traditional sound down IMO

does being half peurto rican count =( thats probably the closest to spanish that i am =P

i would still like to try out one just to feel the difference
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#32
i was being sarcastic haha
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#33
I guess I will remain ignorant until I have played a "flamenco guitar." I can't see a difference, but I am not going to take anyone's word for it, I will just have to play one.
#34
Quote by imLoUsY
Need to be Spanish? You'd probably realise that flamenco isn't the music/culture of ALL Spaniards, just a sub-culture within the country. In fact, many Spanish speaking people couldn't even understand flamenco cante letras.

I recently performed some solea falsetas for a native Spanish professor and she didn't realise the difference between Spanish music and flamenco. LOL!


I guess the Gypsies brought flamenco over from where ever, some say that flamenco didn't start in Spain, but in India. Also that the Gypsies did not invent flamenco as we know it, but of course had a big role in developing it. They most likely got a lot of their insperation from other cultures as well. I have no doubt that it evolved in Spain though, that's just things I have heard about the begginging of it.

But the theory is that "true flamenco" is something that no non-gypsie can play. Only a true Gypsie can play flamenco (theory of only being spanish can you play flamenco might be generalizing it). Through dance, guitar, clapping, or whatever else that makes music, the players will reach a "trance," to where the spirit is playing the music, and it's no longer something physical per se. Watch a good indian movie where they are making music and dancing around a fire until spirits start dancing with them, then you will get a good idea.
Last edited by JakeTKD86 at Oct 7, 2007,
#35
True, flamenco isn't solely Spanish influenced. Moorish, Arambic, Muslim, Indian cultures etc all come into play. That's the interesting aspect about it.

As for being able to play, let's just say that a non-gypsy wouldn't truely understand it's meaning. Impossible, for it's meaning lies in the life and hardship of the gypsies themselves. But it's highly possible to play/sing/dance flamenco technically and rhythmically correct. To say that it's impossible is akin to claiming that someone who hasn't been in love can't write a love song. Well, you CAN actually claim that they wouldn't be able to write an authentic love song!

While flamenco is known to be a closed culture, there have been some non-gypsies accepted by them. Supposedly they can convey duende in their cante/baile/toque aspects. Remember that years ago, solo guitar was frowned upon as being not flamenco. Sabicas wasn't regarded as a true flamenco as well but now he's hailed as a pioneer of flamenco guitar solo. While traditionalists can't accept these changes or maybe violins and electric basses in their flamenco, things have changed nonetheless.
Last edited by imLoUsY at Oct 7, 2007,
#36
Quote by imLoUsY
True, flamenco isn't solely Spanish influenced. Moorish, Arambic, Muslim, Indian cultures etc all come into play. That's the interesting aspect about it.

As for being able to play, let's just say that a non-gypsy wouldn't truely understand it's meaning. Impossible, for it's meaning lies in the life and hardship of the gypsies themselves. But it's highly possible to play/sing/dance flamenco technically and rhythmically correct. To say that it's impossible is akin to claiming that someone who hasn't been in love can't write a love song. Well, you CAN actually claim that they wouldn't be able to write an authentic love song!

While flamenco is known to be a closed culture, there have been some non-gypsies accepted by them. Supposedly they can convey duende in their cante/baile/toque aspects. Remember that years ago, solo guitar was frowned upon as being not flamenco. Sabicas wasn't regarded as a true flamenco as well but now he's hailed as a pioneer of flamenco guitar solo. While traditionalists can't accept these changes or maybe violins and electric basses in their flamenco, things have changed nonetheless.


Most religions have the accpect of "worship" through music, so it makes sense that any religion or person could play flamenco, although flamenco is mainly a belief system then anything else, according to Gypsys or anyone who claims that only spanish people can play flamenco. That's like saying only southern baptists can truely play those old gospel hymns.

A good read...

http://www.guitarist.com/fg/flamfaq.htm
Last edited by JakeTKD86 at Oct 7, 2007,