#2
check out how high the moon..its a jazz standard that has a major/minor key change within the first 4 bars
#3
Piccardy [sp?] 3rd. You can use it with a plagal cadence and then move on from there as you see fit.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#4
Quote by troyponce
Piccardy [sp?] 3rd. You can use it with a plagal cadence and then move on from there as you see fit.

What does that mean? Sorry, I'm not a theory expert yet.
#5
Are you modulating from a minor key to its relative major or to its parallel major key? A common way to modulate is by using a pivot chord. A pivot chord is a chord two keys have in common. For example, a progression like Em7-B7-Am7-D7-GMA7 uses Am7 as a pivot chord. Assuming we're starting in E minor (using the harmonic form) and ending in G major, the Am7 functions as a pivot chord since in E minor, it's the iv chord and in G major it's the ii chord. This allows a smooth transition since the Am7 chord makes sense in both keys.
...to give your love no matter what is what she said...
#7
The simplest way is to go to the dominant of the key you want to go to. If you're on Am, drop to G7 and the go to C. It's hardly the smoothest method out there, though.
How may The National D help you waste your time?
#8
Work with what the parallel keys have in common - 1, 2, 4 and 5. If you look at it in terms of the most important and relevant chords to the defenition of a key, the most important is the 1, and then the fourth and the fifth (I wouldn't recommend transitioning on the 2, it's just ugly). While a simple transition like Cm to C would sound a little weird, it gives you somewhere to start from.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
Disturb the Sound of Silence
#9
^I think it depends on what you're going for. A lot of jazz tunes modulate on the ii chord and it makes perfect sense.

Anyway, the easiest way to modulate between parallel keys besides going straight into the new tonality is to use the V chord (assuming you're not playing a minor v in the minor key) as a pivot like Cm-F7-C.
...to give your love no matter what is what she said...
#10
Sharpen all third degrees, sharpen all sixth degrees. Then transpose that peice either down 9 semitones or up 3 semitones. That works well for melodies. For chords its just a matter of changing the chord from minor to major and then transposing the chord.

EDIT: oops, sharpen all the seventh degrees too . Otherwise it would be mixolydian, not ionian.

And I think I misread the question, sorry
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[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
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Last edited by demonofthenight at Oct 5, 2007,
#11
Quote by demonofthenight
Sharpen all third degrees, sharpen all sixth degrees. Then transpose that peice either down 9 semitones or up 3 semitones. That works well for melodies. For chords its just a matter of changing the chord from minor to major and then transposing the chord.

That's not modulating, that's just half-transposing while in the process fundamentally altering the song from the aeolian to moxilydian mode.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
Disturb the Sound of Silence
#12
Quote by rageandlove04
^I think it depends on what you're going for. A lot of jazz tunes modulate on the ii chord and it makes perfect sense.

Anyway, the easiest way to modulate between parallel keys besides going straight into the new tonality is to use the V chord (assuming you're not playing a minor v in the minor key) as a pivot like Cm-F7-C.

ah, great. thanks
#13
i'm preferable of using the fifth degree in a 7th chord ie

say you're in E minor and want to go to E major, might do something like

Em, Am, D, B7 -> E, A, D, B7