#1
what are the main differences between a guitar with a bolt on neck and a thru neck. i personally prefer thru necks simply because ive never owned a bolt-on neck guitar before.
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#3
Les Pauls arent neckthru btw. Its Set.
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#4
you get better sustain with a neck-through and more importantly (for me at least) they are a lot more comfortable to play on because of how the neck contours onto the body.
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#5
I think better sustain with a neckthru is a myth. I've played quite a few and can't notice any major difference. The main thing is the upper fret access is better, though if something happens to the neck, you're screwed. Bolt ons can also be adjusted more then neckthru.

EDIT: I need to add, some prefer the tone of a set neck/neckthru, and set necks/neckthrus are often of a bit higher quality (not always though)
#6
Quote by CJRocker
I think better sustain with a neckthru is a myth. I've played quite a few and can't notice any major difference. The main thing is the upper fret access is better, though if something happens to the neck, you're screwed. Bolt ons can also be adjusted more then neckthru.

EDIT: I need to add, some prefer the tone of a set neck/neckthru, and set necks/neckthrus are often of a bit higher quality (not always though)


It's not a myth. The vibrations and all that jazz travels through wood. If it was a bolt on, the metal would interfere.
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#7
Quote by TSelman
It's not a myth. The vibrations and all that jazz travels through wood. If it was a bolt on, the metal would interfere.


Funny, my DK2T sustains as long as my friend Epi LP Custom. I've heard that theory, but those "lost vibrations" are stealing what, maybe a second? Not saying it doesn't give you better sustain per se, but is it enough to notice or for it to be worth it? Not.
#8
Neck through guitars deffinately have more sustain. I have an ESP Kirk Hammett sig which is a bolt on and an ESP Dave Mustaine sig which is a neck through. The Dave Mustaine deffinately wins the sustain department, hands down.

Also, I find it a lot easier to reach the upper frets with a neck through guitar.
#9
Neck-thru having more sustain is a myth. It really just depends on the guitar.

A thru neck can have more sustain than a bolt on.
A bolt on can have more sustain than a thru neck.
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#10
I've played all 3 variations and with a well built bolt-on, there's really no difference. The bolt-on does have a bit more "zing" in the upper register that the set-necks don't, but it comes down to the guitar as well. To me, SGs and 335s have a little more of this springy character than Les Pauls, which are darker and rather plunky for my tastes. I've only played a handful of Les Pauls that I actually liked, but they didn't follow the standard Les Paul setup (extra-light solid bodies usually). Les Pauls sound rather dead to my ears. A tele with the bridge pickup mounted directly to the body with a chunk of brass between the pickup and body sustains for days and has a f'ton of body to it. After playing one of those, it really made me re-think the physics of bolt necks and how everything else in the guitar is related. A Les Paul with more mass in the bridge and a more solid connection to the body would yield better results IMO, as would mounting the pickups directly to the body.
#11
Quote by TSelman
It's not a myth. The vibrations and all that jazz travels through wood. If it was a bolt on, the metal would interfere.

With set necks, the glue ofter interferes with sustain, but (well built) bolt-on joints often have a really good wood on wood connection.

it all depends on the quality of the neck joint.
#12
neckthrus are clearly better except for the fact of $$, and that bolt ons dont warp. if you have a neck thru that warps, your ****d.
#14
The neck joint is just one factor in sustain. The bridge type is a factor as are the pickups. And the tuners and the angle of the strings over the nut. Its not just one thing that does it. THe wood is a factor. I own all 3 styles. Do I favor one over the other no each has their uses. The bolt neck is alot easier to adjust if you have a problem or break it. See how much gibson gets to replace a neck some time. My neck thru carvin is pretty picky about drop tuning unless you set the action. My bolt neck strat could care less what tuning is used. And a LP has the shorter scale so its entirely different to play.
#15
depending on the quality, it could be equal. generally neckthru, being a single piece of wood, is regarded as being better for the sound. however, a high quality bolt on is usually indistinguishable, plus cheaper. you're also not screwed over if the neck breaks, because in bolt on the neck isnt the guitar
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#16
The main advantage of a neck-through is better sustain since there are fewer places to stop the vibrations. The actual length of added sustain is debatable, but its still true that there will be some.

Theres also the advantage of the ability to have better upper fret access since a bolt on needs to attach to lower frets in the name of stability.

Finally, theres the fact that you can get away with much smaller neck heels on a neck through which means upper fret playing is much nicer.

The only real advantage of a bolt on is that the neck can be removed if needed.


Set necks are the worst because the dont have the added benefit of the neck-through builds or the convenience of a bolt on.
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#17
I'd like to point out here that not all set necks are the same. There's the basic set neck, but then there are certain guitar companies that have special set neck joints that provide the same upper fret access as a neck-thru guitar.
#18
Quote by HellRaiser620
I'd like to point out here that not all set necks are the same. There's the basic set neck, but then there are certain guitar companies that have special set neck joints that provide the same upper fret access as a neck-thru guitar.

Thos are set-through or invis-bolt necks. They are like a half a neck through in that they continue furthur into the body but not all the way like a neck-through. The advantage is that the necks can be done seperate and joined later.
I've developed a complex where everytime I hear a Lamb of God song, I burst out laughing

My 7 String V build
My Main Guitars:
Kramer Striker FR-2027SM 7 String
BC Rich Afterburner Warlock
Washburn Xb100 Bass
My Effect(s)/Misc:
Digitech RP350