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#1
Well first off, I just wanna say that if this thread has been done before, please forgive me I searched and browsed manually, couldn't find anything specific like what I am about to ask.

For those of you who improvise, and improvise WELL, meaning you actually come up with some great/neat riffs, solos, etc on the spot, heres my question. What exactly is your mindset, what state of mind are you in? What are the thought processes going on in your head?

Heres my dilemma. What I find is that when I improvise (here meaning "making up melodies, solos, and/or riffs on the spot when playing along to a backing track or drummer"), all my stuff eventually "defaults" back into my normal style of playing, which isn't what I want. I find that if I play just a little fast, my mind wanders off, because thats what I trained it to do, so I can play faster than I can manually control each finger, muscle memory, you catch my drift, and thats where I revert to my old style. BUT, when I play really slowly, I later come to realize that it comes out just as bad anyways.

I realize that at the time of the jam, my mind only focused on one or two different techniques or ideas, and dropped the others. For example, I would make a riff with tremolo picking, and another with octave chords, my two favorite things to do, and for some reason, I dont take in the BIG picture, meaning that I don't think about the entire soundscape that I can make, such as chromatic power chords, minor chords, pinch harmonics, tritones, octaves, tremolo picking, bending, legato, etc, and instead stick to just 2-3 of those.

Im frustrated, and am writing this thread out as I think to myself. If I forgot to say something or if I blabbed on for too long, heres a summary:

-Need help thinking outside the box
-What should I think about while improvising?
-How to prepare riffs in my head before taking them out?


A few things you should know: I can usually play what I hear in my head, but the sad thing is, alot of times when I hear something in my head, when I take it out, I accidentally go to the older stuff, and then it sticks, and I forget the original riff in my head. I prepare riffs in my head for about 2 measures before taking them out into my playing, not leaving me enough time. I try to spice things up with random trills and decorations, etc. I never bend, and I never do any scalar runs.

EDIT: ^^^ And thats the things that I do NOW, not what I want to do. I want to bend, I want scalar runs, etc.
#2
This works for me, listen to B.B. King then listen to Necrophagist.
Take two polar opposite styles, listen to both an assload, listen to a lot of diverse bands, and try to incorporate some more unusual techniques.
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#3
you're clearly way better than me in every conceivable way, but all i ever do is let it flow.

i like to do a little scalar run that leads into some bends and legato, so a little trick i can give you is to work on your runs (cuz you simply NEED to do that occasionally at least) but always throw on a different root note. E.g. play an A major scale starting with an E, so it becomes an E mixolydian, giving a totally different feel to teh s0l0. Then switch to a scale with a similar pattern as the one you've just played and that sounds good with it in your experience. So from an E mixolydian i would switch into Em pent. plus if you really are teh Shredz0r you claim to be it wouldn't hurt to throw in some sweeped arpeggios. hell i wouldn't be satisfied unless you threw in some classically inspired cleans, which would invovlve listening to a hell of a lot of different styles. overall i'd say that root notes and bas notes are your friend

as for 'outside the box'... just stfu lol. that doesn't exist, and you will just have to keep practicing different mashes and mixes of things till you get what you like. i wouldn't even think of it as practice - just feel it out.

ummm you probably knew all this **** but whatevs. good luck

and i've never thought of it as improvising. It's more like recycling stuff you know (well enough so as you don't have to think about it) and combining it so it sounds good, no? just think "I know this stuff front and back, so why am i making it so hard?"
#4
Wanna think outside the box? Listen outside the box. In your playing, you're ultimately subconciously emulating what you hear. Listen to a lot of different styles, listen to bands that have absorbed many styles themselves (the late Beatles comes to mind), listen to people solo on different instruments, in different time signatures, to different chords. You can't force yourself to play outside of your own style, but when you start to hear things outside of your usual paradime your style will ultimately change.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
Disturb the Sound of Silence
#5
All that goes through my head is what will sound like what over this chord, and what will I play next to sound like how I want it to sound. I make sure I use my 7 modes to their fulllest. Also remeber to build up tension, as tension keeps your solo's from sounding like an exercise. Chromatic runs and melodic tritones (like playing a Gb after a C) and harmonic tritones (playing a Gb during the C) are good at building tension, actually, playing just about any out of key note will build up some tension.

When I'm playing by myself, I like to play chord (maybe a short chord progression) than improv a melody. If I feel good, I might do both at the same time. This kind of technique works well with metal (play a riff instead of a chord progression), blues (I play a barchord shuffle as my progression), jazz, latin and funk.

And just remember, although you might not think that what your playing is genious, those losers (your audience ) who don't play guitar probably do. There is no box. Its just a matter of hitting the right note at the right time, after that your a proclaimed genious (Marty Friedman paraphrased quote).

You don't have to stay perfectly consonant and play arpeggio after arpeggio and you don't have to play mega shredzorz. Both of those can make your solo sound boring if you don't incorporate it right.

And h(i)ss, never tell insideac to stfu. He's a very experienced and knowledgable guitarist, he just wanted to make a thread on improvising to get other peoples tips.
        ,
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        L.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Oct 5, 2007,
#6
Well, I'm not going to claim that I'm an amazing improviser, because I'm not. But I'll offer what I may.


There are times when you might just want to fall back on what comes naturally. And when it comes to technical things, your fingers will do what you've trained them to do, so anything totally new that requires precise technique is probably out of the question.

With those limitations aside, I am most open to new things when there isn't a limit on my playing. I'm in control of when it ends, so I don't have to worry, "Oh, better make sure I can wrap this up in two bars for the chorus". The other thing I need to do is get my head out of my own ass. I've got to remind myself to not worry about showing off, because then it's just back to the same old licks that I know I can execute at high speed.

Since the experimentation is NOT about showing off, I think of it as being about response. Find something, and respond to it. It could be your drummer's accents, or a weird beat coming from the amp that shouldn't be happening, or a particular audience member. You'll probably find that your ideas for the response lead you into otherwise unfamiliar territory, and you can start to choose what is appropriate. Then, you can develop the material, and the band and audience will "develop" too, giving you new sources for inspiration.


Ideally, you should get your band in on this. Train them to listen, react, and be flexible. Many young rock bands that I've seen (including my own) very effectively limit their soloists by playing the same loud, ****in beat over and over. To paraphrase Spinal Tap, when you're at 10, where can you go from there? If your band reacts to your playing, it augments the improv, and gives you new room to try things.


Sorry if most of this just seems like common sense, but I actually had to learn these things, so maybe they'll help you a bit.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#7
Quote by psychodelia
Well, I'm not going to claim that I'm an amazing improviser, because I'm not. But I'll offer what I may.
No-one great does and no-one is.
Quote by psychodelia
I've got to remind myself to not worry about showing off, because then it's just back to the same old licks that I know I can execute at high speed.
Music is a performing art. It is an art form, and therefore one of your goals should be to entertain your audience, even if that audience is just yourself or just a group of friends. You've got to make them think that your playing good music, therefore you have got to "showoff"

Edit: Genres are another thing. If you label yourself and attempt to stick religiously to that genres, your music will sound boring and uninventive.
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[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Oct 5, 2007,
#8
I think you are expecting too much of yourself. I think it is impossible to see the entire scope of what is possible on a guitar while improvising on-the-fly. There are too many options. So I play the first thing that comes into my head, and I think the more you learn the more different things will come into your head.

All I think about is where I want to go, how to get there, and what I want to sound like. Basically, Melodic Control is what I believe in.

I consider myself a beginner btw, so take this advice as you like.

Edit: Demon, I don't find show-offs entertaining at all. By 'showing-off', I mean playing something that looks cool or is technically challenging just for the sake of flaunting your skills. I find good, interesting music far more entertaining.
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Quote by MudMartin
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Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Oct 5, 2007,
#9
Quote by demonofthenight
No-one great does and no-one is.
Music is a performing art. It is an art form, and therefore one of your goals should be to entertain your audience, even if that audience is just yourself or just a group of friends. You've got to make them think that your playing good music, therefore you have got to "showoff"


Are you serious?!
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#10
Well, before you can improvise effortlessly you need to develop your theory knowledge and technique to a point where you don't really need to think about fingerings, technique, what notes to play etc., but you can concentrate on the big picture and how you want to sound. Phrasing is a keyword here. About the riffs... before you even start to jam, practice the riffs and then when you improvise you just apply them to the backing music. Although, better option instead of separate riffs would be to have a constant and efficient technique so you could play anything you want on any part of the fretboard.
#11
Absolute focus and concentration on what notes you are playing. For non-wind players (guitarists here, basically) sing along with what you play (the actual notes - note names if you're playing slowly, scat if your too fast to pronounce them, but always at pitch, an octave or two above or below to make up for range sometimes)
#12
I turn on my Sirius radio to either the Grateful Dead or the blues station, find the key, and start jamming. It helps to listen to something, or have a backing track playing. Learn new or unique scales and fool around with them for awhile. As your playing, and you come across something that you like, stay with it for awhile, expand on the idea and try to take it somewhere, then maybe bring it back.
Do not concentrate on the finger for you will miss all the heavenly glory.
#13
For me it highly depends on the chord progression and feeling of the song. On something like the Black Crowes rendition of "Hard to Handle," I'll do some runs with a couple of seemingly "wrong notes," just these dissonant tones with scale tones. Like the song is in B, and I'll play this:


e-17p14----17p14---17p14----17p14----
B-------16-------16------16-------16-
G------------------------------------
D------------------------------------
A------------------------------------
E------------------------------------


You can create some really cool licks doing that and chromatic licks. Led Zeppelin's "Black Dog" has a great soloing idea in the main lick in the way that they play the pentatonic scale tones but they throw in that one chromatic spot during the lick. Stuff like that sounds great in the blues, pending on what style of song you're playing.

However, whenever I move into a jazzier style setting, though I'm really not very good at Jazz what with the modes and things, I'll try and create riffs that sound like they're on wrong notes, but climax on a note that's a part of that scale. But you've gotta bear in mind that you can only throw stuff like that in small doses, because a lot of listeners will think that you're out of key or something. So you could be playing a scale like a natural minor or something, and then move into some run that's completely dissonant, for maybe a bar at the most, and then come back to the regular scale.

You've just got to sit there and think, "How can I break outside of my own box with this solo?" I find it best to do stuff like that when I'm jamming on my own so that when I present it to someone like my dad or something, I've got ideas developed, and then I can carry out those ideas. I don't have the opportunity to play live, though, so I'm unsure of what other people would think.

But a lot of ideas that you develop will carry on into other things, and you'll eventually have enough to where each solo does sound beautifully different. But also bear in mind that it's your playing, eventually it will sound the same. But it sounds different to the people listening that it does for you, is my experience. I've recorded solos that I thought sucked then when I played them back they didn't sound as terrible as I thought.
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#15
When I'm improvising, it's as much about movement as it is about hearing anything
in my head. I've done enough practicing ahead of time, to where my fingers can
spontaneously do a number of movements through a scale without having to
think about the movements. At the same time, through the same sort of practice,
I don't really have to think about what notes are in the scale pretty much
anywhere on the neck. I see the whole neck pretty well.

That's mostly if the song or progression stays in the same key and is mostly
diatonic. Switching scales mid-run is harder to do and something I'm working on.
But, the idea is to get it to the same point where you don't have to think about
the notes or details of all the movements.

So, when I'm actually improvising, I'm free to explore all kinds of movements and
combine them in interesting ways. Also very importantly, I'm free to just feel the
RHYTHM. And move with it. When I've listened to a bunch of recordings around
here, the one thing that stands out is people don't seem to be using a metronome.
Their rhythms and phrasing are pretty far off. That can also be do to having to
think too much about what notes they want and not really feeling the beat.

Its really only secondarily that I'm "hearing notes" in my head. To a certain degree
I have a good idea what's going to come out, but if I'm really exploring uncharted
territory, I'm hearing it for the first time a much as anyone listening. Movement
and hearing form a kind of feedback mechansim. Someimes its the movement
producing the notes, and sometimes its vice versa.

Linear thinking while playing will just kill your improvisation. You need to work your
linear thinking out in practice. You don't have time for that kind of thinking. You
need to already know your scales, arpeggios, chord tones ahead of time.
#16
When I improvise, alot of stuff goes on in my mind at first. I usually play over non diatonic chord changes, because I love the challenge and adventure. I guess heres what goes on in my mind:

Before Jamming

Lately I've been working with this chord progression:
Cmaj7 - B7
I put it at a moderate - fast tempo, and the two bars per chord gives a little bit of 'breathing room' when switching scales. First, I'll take a look and write out the chords. We have Cmaj7 (C E G B) and B7 (B D# F# A). Those eight notes are notes that we need to have in the jam.
Then, I'd take scale options that go with the chords. Cmaj7 works with major and Lydian. I prefer Lydian for this chord change, because the avoid note always gives me a problem. And take the B7, I could use a whole bunch of scales over it. Personnally, I chose B mixolydian b6. Its my favorite scale, and it fits well in my opinion.

So for the Cmaj7, I use Lydian over it (C D E F# G A B).
For the B7, I use mixo b6. ( B C# D# E F# G A)

Now, I'll set up a rhythm track, with a decent groove. Set it on loop function, with drums (from my drum machine) and let it play back and listen.

During Jamming

When I start off soloing over the chords, I'll think about:
-The chords and the rhythm of them
-The notes and scales on the fretboard. What notes are where, and which notes will be switched when the next chord comes. And of course, the chord tones.
-The groove
-How to get from one area to the next
-What licks to play, etc...

Now, that is when I'm getting used to the chord progression, so everything is fairly complicated. However, after a while, I slowly start to forget the changes, the notes, etc... because Im already used to it all. I'm done thinking about the scales, because now all they are, are familiar patterns. And the chord tones, I've already explored and spotted out. Now, all I have left to focus on is the groove.

I think that makes sense, and I think thats how I think when Im soloing over things. Hopefully that helped, and sorry for the poor post format! Im no pro, and I'm always practicing to get better.
DANNY

Quote by kevinm4435 to some guy
hey d00d i herd u dont like shred u r a genius 4 thinkin dat. all shred is fukin lame wit no soul u no wat im sayin??
#17
I think the most useful thing is to sing along as you play. It really helps your phrasing because it makes you think about the melody. Muscle memory is important, but I think you need to conciously decide to play a certain run, rather than just doing it because it's what you always do.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#18
You know how this isn't a tough question if you're just vamping on one chord? That basically means put in the legwork and become that familiar with EVERY chord you are going to see in a piece. Listen to how tentative Tommy Flanagan, a phenomenal pianist, sounds on Giant Steps. Even somebody as talented as him will find it hard if he's not familiar with the harmony. This will of course happen to you too, and much more often, but you really gotta put the work in to effortless switching of tonal centers in your head and in your fingers.

When THAT happens, or while you're doing that (which I know you will because you seem to be verrry dedicated), start small. Learn short rhytmic or melodic motifs, then use them in different situations. Write them down. Think of new ones, incorporate them. Play back recordings and get new little ideas there.
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#19
Improvisation is composition..... instant composition.

Get better at composing, and you will become a better improvisor as well.

If you spend most of your time focused on speed, and technical excersises (alot of people do) that may be the problem, as that is all based on muscle memorization. You may have more success if you balance that technical practice with some musical training as well.
#20
Well, thanks for the posts, first of all! , however, a few things that I have to clear up.

Im not focused on speed or technical exercises right now, I just want to make better jams. I also want to try to make riffs on the spot, and I don't want to rehearse it, because I think once I rehearse something before a jam, it won't feel like a jam anymore

My drummer and I are extremely tight, usually when we jam, he can keep a groove that sounds sick to whatever im playing, but I feel like I can't hold my end of the stick because I don't play as well as he does. Also, im not trying to show off or anything, Im not asking to make fast eye melting riffs, just want to make something that sounds good, and that comes out smoothly.

I dont see how singing will help me out as I improvise, because singing and playing pre-rehearsed stuff is hard enough, let alone make up words and melodies in my head and sing them as well as play them, thats pretty tough.


I really hope that it isnt like Eminus Prime said, that its impossible and Im asking too much of myself , because I really want to be able to do this. I read every post over and over though, and I am definately gonna give it all a shot, keep the suggestions coming! Thanks!

#21
um im not quite as strong a player as you, but when i improvise i make sure i sing along (in correct pitch) with 95 percent of what i play, the other five percent usually involves me turning on a fuz and going overboard with my whammy pedal (bending 1 oct up usually), and flatting notes with my fingers. I usually dont think, just sort of let it flow (though i probobly should work on visualizing my improvisations before i play them, but then they wouldnt be true improvisation would they? But definatly sing with yourself as you improvise (though for public playing you may wana step away from the mike to avoid looking like a tad doucheish) eventually if you can do something cool like use your voice to make power chords with the notes you play, id imagine that would be awesome (like sining the perfect 5th of every note).
But i find singing is key
#22
Insideac, when we say "sing along with what you're playing," it doesn't mean make up lyrics and sing them. You just sing the pitches, I go da-da-da-da, but la or any other sound (even humming) would work just as well.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#23
I usually think ahead. I learned alot from Melodic Control, and the most important think I learned is to know as much about the notes as you can. I usually think of a note I want to land on at some point, and then let a little walk to it either happen naturally, or if I want to be flashy I'll play one of my favorite runs or fast bits. It's all about thinking about where you want to go, and the only way to know where you want to go is to know exactly how the notes in (or out) of the key you are in will sound.
#24
sing melodies prior to jam, then write them out, it helps subconsciously

*cough* 32 nps emotionaless playing *cough*
Quote by beadhangingOne
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#25
Quote by insideac

Im not focused on speed or technical exercises right now, I just want to make better jams. I also want to try to make riffs on the spot, and I don't want to rehearse it, because I think once I rehearse something before a jam, it won't feel like a jam anymore


What you have to rehearse is the KIND of things you'd use while jamming, not
exact repetitions. For instance, I've practiced a lot of inverted 2nds, 3rds, 4ths,
5ths. triads. 3 & 4 note braids just to name a few things. I do them up and down
the neck in all positions. When I'm jamming and the urge strikes me I can pull any
of those out of my pocket whereever I happen to be and use it without thinking
about it. I'll just vary the phrasing and rhythm for how I feel at the time. It will
never really sound the same.

It's really important to be in touch with the beat. It might be even more important
the the notes you choose. You might want to not try and be too complex with
lots of notes and see what you can do with fewer notes and more phrasing. Above
all listen to what's going on ...
#26
Get a guitarist buddy of yours and one of you record a loopable backing track (or download one) that sounds good with the scale you want to play. Then, one of you begin playing the scale, don't try to go fast or just go all over the scale, just try to make it so it sounds good. Every 8th beat (like if you were using a metronome) the guitarist stops and the other guitarist starts playing, trying to compliment what was just played and what is being played from the backing track. Every 8th beat switch. It is really fun and will probably help you out (even though I generally suck at the complimenting part).

And remember: in order to play something good, you don't need to go up and down the neck. While that may be impressive to another guitarist, if you're not extremely comfortable with what you're improvising in and can easily keep a melody going up and down (in which case you wouldn't have this thread) it's all academic. It probably won't sound very interesting.
Last edited by CloserToTheSun at Oct 8, 2007,
#27
Quote by demonofthenight
And h(i)ss, never tell insideac to stfu. He's a very experienced and knowledgable guitarist, he just wanted to make a thread on improvising to get other peoples tips.


just calm down i wasn't actually telling anyone to shove it back there. i gave him the limited advice i could, since it's pretty clear to me that Insideac is way better than i'll ever be. i tend to swear a lot, and i just kinda don't like the phrase outside the box that's all lol.

and i just wanted to recommend you do what i'm doing right now. I have like 8 or 9 different youtube videos of completely different styes/genres of music open at once (preferably in key with one another), and i listen to them all at the same time with a guitar in my hands. It sounds retarded i know but its helped me to stick different styles and techniques into places where they normally wouldn't belong and still maintain the solo's musical integrity whilst spicing it up considerably.

and i would def do what closertothesun said. that works in my experience.
#28
1. Forget about the callisthenics.
2. Get the groove.
3. Play a note.
4. Play another one
5. repeat 4

You're making it way too complicated because you're searching for the magic bullet and there ain't one, and yet you reject the one piece of advice is really going to help. Singing helps.

If you're a musician improvising is the ultimate form of self-expression, you're creating original music out of thin air. You need to be able to contact that creative space and have the tools on board to convert whatever's in there into music.

There are improvising methods that involve learning scales, target tones, blaah blaah you need to practice all that before hand but when you're playing you're not thinking any more.

And SING. You don't need words, you don't even have to sing in key or get the right notes, turn your amp up enough so that no-one will hear you, you just need to get out of your head and get the juices flowing.
#29
cal·is·then·ics /ˌkæləsˈθɛnɪks/ [kal-uhs-then-iks] – noun

1. (used with a plural verb) gymnastic exercises designed to develop physical health and vigor, usually performed with little or no special apparatus.
2. (used with a singular verb) the art, practice, or a session of such exercises

I'm not sure how that applies to this thread, but it's probably just going over my head

I have to disagree with saying you don't think when you improvise. There are some times when you just play whatever, but sometimes it really needs some thought. For instance if you want to sound consonant over a really weird fast chord progression, you really need to know what the chord tones are else you'll have no choice but to sound dissonant.

I think there is a balance to be found. Whenever possible, I think it's better to play without thinking at all and just do what comes naturally (subconciously drawing from practicing scales/arpeggios/note patterns). Sometimes however you really have to think. This is based on real experience, I play in a latin jazz trio with drums and trumpet, and when I get a solo I need to think about the chord progression and keep it going. If I just played whatever the hell I wanted, sure I might express myself better, but at the end of the day my band members would kick me out and I wouldn't get paid.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#31
First, I think about the mood. What kind of mood do the chords portray...sad, upbeat, etc. Thats what you keep in mind. Then, think about what scales might sound good. say if its sad, try dorian. If that doesn't work, try minor, or vice versa. Then, try phrygian or phrygian dominant. How does that sound? If it sounds good, you know you can switch back and forth and use notes and phrases from both scales. Try throwing in notes from other scales too, as well as passing tones. Sometimes I like to see how far I can go with chromatic riffs that sound neat, seeing if I can cover all 12 notes. Also, use double and triple stops where you can. Add big intervallic moves as well as smaller intervals to open it up a little. Try going from low to high or high to low, but not in a huge run. Try it relatively slowly, or using big intervals. Slides, bends, etc. all add to the feel. Use different rhythms as well, to keep things interesting.

In a nutshell: Different scales, rhythms, and techniques. Thats what I think about when I improvise.
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#32
transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe transcribe


it's really the key to anything musically from my experience.
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"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#34
Quote by insideac
Wtf is transcribing going to do to help me improvise?


Help you understand how others improvise, what improvisational tools they use and thus use that knowledge in your own improvisations? Train your ear?
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#35
Quote by rich2k4
it's really the key to anything musically from my experience.

I agree, transcribe and analyze a wide variety of music and learn from that.
#36
it also helps for phrasing, i did that a little while ago, went through a few satch songs, just the first like minute of them, and just transcribed stuff, and as a result my phrasing improved drastically
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#37
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Edit: Demon, I don't find show-offs entertaining at all. By 'showing-off', I mean playing something that looks cool or is technically challenging just for the sake of flaunting your skills. I find good, interesting music far more entertaining.
Not showing off in a visual sense, or a 'flaunting my skills' sense (lolzorz, ubershredz at 40nps using teh arpeggios ). I just meant to play something that sounds good and is meant to sound good, so as to entertain someone. For some reason I know have the entertainer stuck in my head

This is why I don't like playing metal; I mean in a concert situation, I play metal heaps by myself. Although its fun to play, people would much rather hear me play a classical song (even if they say, "ew classical, thats for old people and poofs") or even a blues song.

Quote by Resiliance
Are you serious?!
Are you a shredi knight?
        ,
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[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
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        L.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Oct 8, 2007,
#38
This thread contains some of the most valuable information ever. I hope it never dies out, or even if it does, then a link to this thread should be put up in that sticky.
Quote by buckethead_jr
I didn't think they had metal in the 1790's

Quote by Guitarislife125
Copper is a metal

Quote by buckethead_jr
Ah, touche.
#40
Quote by demonofthenight
Are you a shredi knight?


No. I am merely an imposter.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
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