#1
What are the advantages of an effects loop? If I have an effects loop, does that mean it doenst matter if i have pedals which arent true bypass?
thanks
#2
effects in FX Loop are put after preamp section, and before poweramp section. phasers, delays and time-based effects usually go in there. try both ways and see what you like best

it always matters that your pedals are truebypass
#3
advantage is, whatever in is in the loop, isn't getting shaped by your preamp's EQ. Like mentioned, modulation fx usually work very well there. True bypass on your pedals really doesn't have anything to do with your fx loop. All true bypass means, is the signal is not going thru the pedals circuit when it's off. However, a well designed bypass buffer can work just as well if implemented correctly, and can actually be preferable if you are driving a long signal chain of stomps.
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#4
^thanks a lot, so if im going to use delays, chorus etc, i would need an effects loop so that i dont distort the chorus or delay when using a distortion pedal? and does it really make a difference if the pedlas are or arent true bypass?
#5
you don't "need" an fx loop, it's just handy to have if you don't want your preamps eq shaping the modulation effect. It also works well if you want the fx after your preamp's OD. You can always use a disto/od pedal before your chorus/delay with stompboxes in front too. It depends on the amp and gear, fx won't always necessarily sound better on the loop, you'll have to experiment like mentioned above. There are plenty of great amps that don't have fx loops too.

Yes, true bypass can make a big difference. True bypass is literally a piece of wire bypassing the circuit. The reason it isn't on every pedal, is because the switch itself is more expensive since you need a DPDT switch to have the wire bypass. It's cheaper to just throw a buffer circuit on the pcb. You can test it for yourself with any cheap pedal, I've noticed it the most with the cheaper wah pedals. With the pedal off, just put it in your signal chain, and then take it out, and listen to the difference both ways. If it's not true bypass, the signal still gets passed thru the pedals circuity, and this can affect the tone. My old GCB95 wah used to really suck some tone out, just sitting in the signal chain unused and off. Some pedals have good buffer circuits however, so the signal still passes through the pedal, but the tone suckage isn't nearly as noticable. This can be beneficial too depending on your setup, since that buffer circuit can keep the signal integrity stronger. With a ton of true bypass pedals in your chain, you are just adding lengths of wire to the signal chain, so that can degrade the signal over long runs.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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Last edited by Erock503 at Oct 6, 2007,
#6
^ wow thanks mate, youve helped alot. trouble is, i dont know which non true bypass pedals are going to suck the tone badly. do you know any makes of pedal who suck the tone badly, and any which dont really make a difference?
#7
boss pedals have generally bad bypass. Most with true bypass will indicate that they are true bypass
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#8
yeh i used to have a boss ds-1 and it had terribel bypass, it distorted my clean sound quite badly, what are pro-co and electro harmonix bypasses like?
#10
Quote by Erock503
you don't "need" an fx loop, it's just handy to have if you don't want your preamps eq shaping the modulation effect. It also works well if you want the fx after your preamp's OD.


Experimentation is the key, find out what you like best.

The pre-amp's job is to amplify the line level signal into one that can be used by the power amp for the final amplification stage. The beauty of the FX loop is that you can take these modulation FX and apply them to the already pre-amp'd signal. The result is a "cleaner" sounding effect, closer to the natural sound of the pedal because it's only being amplified one time.
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#11
Dunno if this has been covered but im not in a reading mood, but it stops your effects from being distorted, for example, i dont particurely like putting my grail before the preamp, because kicking in the OD means the reverb effect is also overdriven, and it sounds abit of a mess. =(
#12
Haven't read the thread but it places the effects after the preamp so distortion isnt added to the effect.
#14
Quote by Tweak88
big muff it's ok truebypass



do u mean its true bypass? or that it doesnt effect the tone too much? sorry.