#1
thought I'd start this thread, since I think many people would found it useful to know how to write in a certain bands style. Could be inspiring.

feel free to post some new.



Children of Bodom (by Philipp Sobecki)


Let's pick Hatebreeder.
A simple rhythm, which is steady throughout a whole passage (|0-0000|0-0000|... ; triplets, but they are not that important) and lots of palm muted notes. The pause between them is very important, as it adds heavyness. Too many pauses might kill that speed-feeling, so you want to use them not TOO much. A too "complex" rhythm might kill the flow. CoB songs rather use simple and "old" rhythms and riffs and add their signature sound (orchestra hits, synths, speed - they are VERY important here) to make them sound new.

To add more intensity, use some chords. CoB don't use powerchords only, they are rather rare. You'll find more thirds (Root - b3 or 3) too (sometimes harmonized with two guitars, sometimes one guitar alone with variations. But they help to sound like CoB or many other modern metal bands [with exceptions of course]). An example is 00:09 in the song.
Don't use palm muted notes only.
High pinch harmonics at "final" notes are also very common.

Another very important thing is that you'll want to employ happy melodies. That can be either done by arpeggiating major chords (or progressions), or just by starting to write a simple melody and building all the rest around it.

You'll also find lots of sweeping and three-notes-per-string arpeggios (12-14-15 || 12-14-15 etc.)

To add variations to the riffs, play them with one guitar only, then with a harmonizing instrument (2nd guitar and/or synths). Think of development. They do that alot.

The synths are rather sharp, not mellow. They sound a little different without the other instruments, because they get lost in the mix a little, so take care when creating them.

Drums are fairy simple, lots of doublebass and snare plus the "big" cymbals (crash, chinese, ride etc.) with toms used as fills.


As a conclusion, the most important aspects are the happy melodies (which are often fast and not so easy to play) and the synths.

Dragonforce (by Philipp Sobecki)

Okay, I don't have any DF songs here, I'm just listening to Through Fire and Flames over youtube.

Well, it sounds as they are using lots and lots of tracks at once.
Almost everything is harmonized, keyboards (with simple synth-sounds, think of "nintendo metal", although it's not quite true ), guitars and vocals.
Plus, there are quite "full" drums (double bass, lots of snare, some toms, not so much cymbals -> not too sharp. Sharpness comes from the guitars and the vocals here) and pads in the background. Quite over-the-top, not bad, at least something different.
You have to fill your frequency range with softer/balanced tones to get this full sound.

Tempos start at 180 BPM, you know that ;P

Everything is quite melodic. To get their vibe, I'd use lots of natural fours, fifths, minor thirds, and major/minor sixths. Even when using a major scale (don't do it too often, try melodic & natural minor, dorian, etc. But also try Mixolydian. Just don't do too many extremes here (lydian, locrian, etc.), try to empathise everything that has to do with minor in terms of "soft" (+ major 6th as the complementary interval to minor third (-> dorian!)), use dorian/aeolian cadences, ...
Use speed, but you'll need at least one important role which is slow to get this flying vibe (-> vocals, drums or guitar can do this quite well).
You have to pursue that orange "afternoon" feeling.

Don't play too much with rhythms, DF is not that complex (but if you wish to do some more "difficult" songs, do it! But beware, as it can destroy that easy mood DF creates. It's about speed/flow/happiness, not about heavyness or too much thinking).

One advice from Captain Obvious: Don't be afraid of funny, high-pitched sounds, squeals etc.

Oh, and one more thing: Use enhancement pedals.

Okay, so tell your friends Herman Ri is cool or I'll **** on your head! Bye bye

Play Like: Dave Murray (by MadassAlex)


Scales

Minor Pentatonic, Aeolian, both with occasional chromatics

Rhythm

Solid strings of 16ths punctuated with phrases consisting of 8ths.

Techniques

Hammer-ons and pull offs! Lots of 'em!

Notes

Dave's style is very, very fluid. His tends to create excitement not so much with individual notes, but by placing emphasis on the pitch of a whole phrase. A good example is his solo in The Trooper. The first section is two trills, then an 8th note phrase that descends to A. I'm assuming the rhythm section underneath is an A5 powerchord riff as the final A note of the phrase has a sense of finality to it.
The next section is another set of trills, that ascends and descends until it reaches some bends that becomes a smooth legato section (and the most technically challenging part of the solo).
Finally, the solo ends with a melodic bending section in a minor pentatonic shape (which again ends on an A, despite the song being in the key of E minor. Note the modulation).
Basically, the fast legato sections are there to set up the resolution for the melodic sections. NONE of the legato sections end on a root note or any other note that would bring closure to the solo. In every single case, yep, the melodic sections. Note that I use the term "melodic" relatively - the legato sections are very melodic due to the variance in pitch.
Remember, while it's tempting to go all-out speed in metal, a well-placed melody ending on the root note will turn a technical shred-fest into a solo that will get a real reaction from your audience, and that's the approach Dave takes - wow them with your speed, then amaze them with your brilliance.
Alternatively, you could think of it a duel against oneself from different approaches.

Freak Kitchen


The important thing here is the main bassy riffs. Also the best tuning for the "Freak Kitchen sound" is c#sus4. Alot of other things can be used to though. Another thing is don't be afraid of odd time signatures.

You want to work with an "pattern" in the riffs. So if you have
002350
002350
002350 (from Snap) you can do things as reverse it, play it on higher notes or just do it in a different order. Also if you have something between try and do the same with that only. Don't be afraid to use a lot of jazzy stuff, and weird scales http://freakguitar.com/scales.html. Also alot of tapping and harmonics are important . The verses consists of a lot of dissonance, weird chords and is pretty mellow most of the time.
The solos is often very odd. Don't be afraid to let it sound well odd. Jazzy, but often faster and more distortion. Also alot of harmonics, tapping, alternative picking and sweep picking. An important thing: think of the whole fretboard. Don't limit yourself.

Other than that, download some tabs or listen to the songs and anything else should be easy to figure it. Except if you listen to the Freak Guitar solo albums, but that's another thing.

If someone wants to add something, since I am not really the best in the world to describe the things I think in my head to others, you are welcome to add.

Go to the Freak Guitar site and look at licks. You will learn a lot of funky things from that.

Mattias does not use any weird effects. His tone and technique is what makes it weird. Also the harmonics he does is described on his website, and does not come from a whammy pedal. They are very useful, and you won't have to spend extra money on a whammy pedal.


The Pillows (by FoolOnThePlanet)


Sawao(rhythm):
As the singer, Sawao normally does the chord work, but often and as of late, he has done some lead lines as well. He uses a wide array of chords from octaves to power chords, open chords, and bar chords. His lead lines normally harmonize Manabe's. He doesn't have that big of a pedal board. Most of his tone comes from his Twin Reverb and DM-4 Distortion Modeler. His cyclone has single coils, if I'm not mistaken. He uses a wide array of strumming patterns as well. They vary, as you can imagine, from song to song. But he really expirements with them. He keeps most of his work simple however, becasue he sings, but he is also VERY energetic on stage.

Notable tracks: Mighty Lovers, My Girl, Gazelle City, Hybrid Rainbow, Little Busters, Ride on Shooting Star.

Manabe(lead):
I love Manabe's style of playing, mainly his solos. He writes great riffs and lead lines. Most of the time Sawao does chords and he is doing lead work throughout the song, but thruogh many choruses and sometimes for verses, he plays chords as well. He does a lot of octave work, both solo wise and lead wise. His most famous technique is tremolo picking. So many of his solos have trem picking in them, if it's not the whole solo, it's some of it. Notable solo's to listen to that feature trem are Hybrid Rainbow or Sayonara Universe. Kono yo no Hate Made has half trem, half melody. He also likes his sliding. To the contrary of Sawao, Manabe has quite a large pedalboard and get's his tone not only from that, but from his orgasmic Orange half stack and he also uses a Marshall half stack.

Notable tracks: Swanky Street, Strange Chameleon, Hybrid Rainbow, One Life, Sayonara Universe, Kono yo no Hate Made.
__________________
Ibanez s540 with gold Schaller bridge and OMGGOLD hardware

Ibanez RGR320 with Lo-Edge Pro bridge and scalloped fretboard

Lee Jackson XLSC - 500

Roland Microcube

Dunlop Jazz III black
Last edited by PhantomNote at Oct 9, 2007,
#2
Play Like: Dave Murray

Scales

Minor Pentatonic, Aeolian, both with occasional chromatics

Rhythm

Solid strings of 16ths punctuated with phrases consisting of 8ths.

Techniques

Hammer-ons and pull offs! Lots of 'em!

Notes

Dave's style is very, very fluid. His tends to create excitement not so much with individual notes, but by placing emphasis on the pitch of a whole phrase. A good example is his solo in The Trooper. The first section is two trills, then an 8th note phrase that descends to A. I'm assuming the rhythm section underneath is an A5 powerchord riff as the final A note of the phrase has a sense of finality to it.
The next section is another set of trills, that ascends and descends until it reaches some bends that becomes a smooth legato section (and the most technically challenging part of the solo).
Finally, the solo ends with a melodic bending section in a minor pentatonic shape (which again ends on an A, despite the song being in the key of E minor. Note the modulation).
Basically, the fast legato sections are there to set up the resolution for the melodic sections. NONE of the legato sections end on a root note or any other note that would bring closure to the solo. In every single case, yep, the melodic sections. Note that I use the term "melodic" relatively - the legato sections are very melodic due to the variance in pitch.
Remember, while it's tempting to go all-out speed in metal, a well-placed melody ending on the root note will turn a technical shred-fest into a solo that will get a real reaction from your audience, and that's the approach Dave takes - wow them with your speed, then amaze them with your brilliance.
Alternatively, you could think of it a duel against oneself from different approaches.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#3
can anyone try and describe Dream Theater?
Ibanez s540 with gold Schaller bridge and OMGGOLD hardware

Ibanez RGR320 with Lo-Edge Pro bridge and scalloped fretboard

Lee Jackson XLSC - 500

Roland Microcube

Dunlop Jazz III black
#4
Awesome idea.

I'll write one or two up a bit later.
HEY
Do you like anime/manga?
PM me about buying the graphic novels I'm trying to sell
#5
We should also get people to do some of the basic blues artists that would be very helpful
For example: Robert Johnson, Son House, Muddy Waters, B.B. King, Elmore James, John Lee Hooker, Albert King, Freddie King, Howlin' Wolf, T-Bone Walker, Wilson Pickett, Blind Willie Johnson, Lightning Hopkins are some of those good standard blues artists. Some standard jazz, funk, reggae ect. would probably be a good idea for whoever is interested and knows about these styles.

The artists that I would personally be interested in is Duane Allman, Jerry Garcia, David Gilmour, Derek Trucks, Billy Gibbons, Keith Richards(especially rhythm), Bob Weir(rhythm) and Jimi Hendrix(his rhythm and the way he mixes rhythm and lead fluently is what I'm interested in). I'll try to post whatever I can soon.
#6
Freak Kitchen

The important thing here is the main bassy riffs. Also the best tuning for the "Freak Kitchen sound" is c#sus4. Alot of other things can be used to though. Another thing is don't be afraid of odd time signatures.

You want to work with an "pattern" in the riffs. So if you have
002350
002350
002350 (from Snap) you can do things as reverse it, play it on higher notes or just do it in a different order. Also if you have something between try and do the same with that only. Don't be afraid to use a lot of jazzy stuff, and weird scales http://freakguitar.com/scales.html. Also alot of tapping and harmonics are important . The verses consists of a lot of dissonance, weird chords and is pretty mellow most of the time.
The solos is often very odd. Don't be afraid to let it sound well odd. Jazzy, but often faster and more distortion (or we could say distortion). Also alot of harmonics, tapping, alternative picking and sweep picking. An important thing: think of the whole fretboard. Don't limit yourself.

Other than that, download some tabs or listen to the songs and anything else should be easy to figure it. Except if you listen to the Freak Guitar solo albums, but that's another thing.

If someone wants to add something, since I am not really the best in the world to describe the things I think in my head to others, you are welcome to add.

Go to the Freak Guitar site and look at licks. You will learn a lot of funky things from that.
Ibanez s540 with gold Schaller bridge and OMGGOLD hardware

Ibanez RGR320 with Lo-Edge Pro bridge and scalloped fretboard

Lee Jackson XLSC - 500

Roland Microcube

Dunlop Jazz III black
Last edited by PhantomNote at Oct 9, 2007,
#7
I know they're a more or less unknown band, but they're my favorite, and I know of a few people on here that also like them....


the pillows

Sawao(rhythm):
As the singer, Sawao normally does the chord work, but often and as of late, he has done some lead lines as well. He uses a wide array of chords from octaves to power chords, open chords, and bar chords. His lead lines normally harmonize Manabe's. He doesn't have that big of a pedal board. Most of his tone comes from his Twin Reverb and DM-4 Distortion Modeler. His cyclone has single coils, if I'm not mistaken. He uses a wide array of strumming patterns as well. They vary, as you can imagine, from song to song. But he really expirements with them. He keeps most of his work simple however, becasue he sings, but he is also VERY energetic on stage.

Notable tracks: Mighty Lovers, My Girl, Gazelle City, Hybrid Rainbow, Little Busters, Ride on Shooting Star.


Manabe(lead):
I love Manabe's style of playing, mainly his solos. He writes great riffs and lead lines. Most of the time Sawao does chords and he is doing lead work throughout the song, but thruogh many choruses and sometimes for verses, he plays chords as well. He does a lot of octave work, both solo wise and lead wise. His most famous technique is tremolo picking. So many of his solos have trem picking in them, if it's not the whole solo, it's some of it. Notable solo's to listen to that feature trem are Hybrid Rainbow or Sayonara Universe. Kono yo no Hate Made has half trem, half melody. He also likes his sliding. To the contrary of Sawao, Manabe has quite a large pedalboard and get's his tone not only from that, but from his orgasmic Orange half stack and he also uses a Marshall half stack.

Notable tracks: Swanky Street, Strange Chameleon, Hybrid Rainbow, One Life, Sayonara Universe, Kono yo no Hate Made.
HEY
Do you like anime/manga?
PM me about buying the graphic novels I'm trying to sell
#8
added
Ibanez s540 with gold Schaller bridge and OMGGOLD hardware

Ibanez RGR320 with Lo-Edge Pro bridge and scalloped fretboard

Lee Jackson XLSC - 500

Roland Microcube

Dunlop Jazz III black