#1
i've tried both the Affinity Jazz and Precision basses and a used Behringer Ultrabass BX1200.

the price is right and i've read some of the feedback on squiers - some good and some bad. i'm not savvy about bass amps so you can understand my dilemna and confusion.

would the pbass and behringer combo be sufficient for school talent shows and for the next few years? i love entwistle, john paul jones, and grand funk railroad.

can i do better? my budget is $500. i can save some more but i need the gear asap. thanks in advance!

#2
I would personally get a Squier Vintage Modified series bass instead of the Affinity series ones. As for amp I'd get the SWR LA12. I play through an SWR at my lessons and I really like them.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Vintage-Modified-70s-Jazz-Bass?sku=519639
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Vintage-Modified-Precision-Bass?sku=519638
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/SWR-LA12-Bass-Combo-Amplifier?sku=482037
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#3
Firstly, if you try a squire before you buy, and make sure it plays ok, it should be fairly good.

Though the jazz would probably be a better choice than the precicion, as it is far more flexible tone wise. A J can get close to a P sound, but a P can't get very close to a jazz sound at all.

And I would not go behringer. They are notorious for overrating their specs, and having low quality. One broke on me when I tried for my first amp. As in, started smokeing when I turned to volume up to 3/4 to see how loud it could go.

Then the shop came clean about their quality and gave me little 10W Peavy Amp (tube, so it went loud for its size, so I was happy).
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#4
Quote by gm jack
Firstly, if you try a squire before you buy, and make sure it plays ok, it should be fairly good.

Though the jazz would probably be a better choice than the precicion, as it is far more flexible tone wise. A J can get close to a P sound, but a P can't get very close to a jazz sound at all.

And I would not go behringer. They are notorious for overrating their specs, and having low quality. One broke on me when I tried for my first amp. As in, started smokeing when I turned to volume up to 3/4 to see how loud it could go.

Then the shop came clean about their quality and gave me little 10W Peavy Amp (tube, so it went loud for its size, so I was happy).


Jazz bias ahoy! Remember the P feel is still unattainable by a Jazz, and vice versa, and that goes for both the sound produced and the feel of the guitar. Though I have to say Squier Vintage Modified Jazz is the best Squier bass on the market.

And agreed totally on the Behringer. They're the syphilis of the bass world.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#5
thanks for the quick feedback!

yea, i liked the jazz bass tone except the pbass felt better and i liked the chug.

strange to hear the trashing of the behringer! our former bassist, the most skillful in our school just joined another band composed of seniors. he made the other bassists with expensive gear sound like beginners with his inexpensive peavey pbass and behringer bx1200.

even with our tube amps (not cranked all the way) and beginner-level playing, he made the band sound very good cuz of his timing and control.

i'm going to check out the SWR which i didn't see at the local guitar center. while i'm at it, i'll re-audition the vintage modified. I really like the Highway One PBass - awesome neck, BadAss bridge, very smooth, except outside my budget.

thanks again!

#6
Quote by Caustic
Jazz bias ahoy! Remember the P feel is still unattainable by a Jazz, and vice versa, and that goes for both the sound produced and the feel of the guitar. Though I have to say Squier Vintage Modified Jazz is the best Squier bass on the market.

And agreed totally on the Behringer. They're the syphilis of the bass world.



But for a begginer, it is probably better to have a wider range of tonal options, and then chose whatever he wants after more than an hour at most of trying them.
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#7
Quote by Ulrik
thanks for the quick feedback!

yea, i liked the jazz bass tone except the pbass felt better and i liked the chug.

strange to hear the trashing of the behringer! our former bassist, the most skillful in our school just joined another band composed of seniors. he made the other bassists with expensive gear sound like beginners with his inexpensive peavey pbass and behringer bx1200.


While I can't disprove that... I'd strongly advise you one-two a Behringer amp with other amps in your price range. While the Behringer will offer more wattage, it's a false promise due to them grading their amps with their peak wattage, not their RMS, which means they're constantly running "in the red". They won't last long and are notorious for just giving up the ghost pretty quickly. Better to get a smaller amp that will last you longer and get a much better tone than to get what seems to be a bigger amp and end up replacing it.

Although I definately understand and partially agree with gm_jack's thoughts about the Jazz and it's tonal options, if you're definately leaning heavily towards the tone and feel of a P bass, then buying a Jazz is probably not so great an idea. Better start off on a bass you like than to start on a bass that "offers more".
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
Last edited by Caustic at Oct 6, 2007,
#8
As a beginner I would go Jazz, simplely because of the versatility they offer. And I am a P-bass kinda guy by the way.
#9
Don't get an Affinity Series Squier, get a slightly more expensive one. They last longer, play better, and sound better because they're made with better woods.
#10
Quote by Sound Mind
Don't get an Affinity Series Squier, get a slightly more expensive one. They last longer, play better, and sound better because they're made with better woods.


Actually, just don't get and older Affinity Series, Squier has stepped up it game lately, so they are not as bad as they used to be.
#11
Yeah, I have a fairly new Affinity and its nearly on par with the VMs I've tried. Maybe I found a gem (other than a dodgy fret...) but I think the alder on the Affinities makes it much better than their rep, especially if you decide to replace the pups.
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#12
Quote by gm jack
Yeah, I have a fairly new Affinity and its nearly on par with the VMs I've tried. Maybe I found a gem (other than a dodgy fret...) but I think the alder on the Affinities makes it much better than their rep, especially if you decide to replace the pups.


I'd say that if you buy an Affinity, you're basically buying some guitar shaped good wood. New pups and pots and a setup and you've got a good instrument.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.