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#1
Alright, so I think I have clinical depression, I'm sad all the time, and very few things cheer me up, I have no idea why though, could it be work? my current lack of a social life? (I see one person on a regular basis, one other person on a semi-regular basis) either way, I feel I need anti-depressants, but at the same time i'm not sure, I have a perscription, I just have to get it filled, comments? (perferably from people who have suffered from depression in the past, and what did you do about it?)
That is not dead which can eternal lie
And with strange aeons even death may die


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#2
Get some exercise, it helps tons.
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#4
excersice more music less PC and THEN go out and be more sociable(but do the others first)
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#5
Masturbate?

Makes me feel good.

And maybe pick up a sport. I took up Muay Thai.

But don't eat to feel better. It's a vicious cycle.
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#6
It might be that you're feeling "alone", yes. If you have a need for being social and that need isn't being filled you'll obviously be sadder.

What do you work with?

Oh and I wouln't get anti-depressant if I really didn't have to; it's better to fix things in your life. Otherwise it'd be like taking aspirins for headaches instead of finding out and fixing why your head is aching.
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#8
I know all about it. Get professional help.
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#9
Well, just to clarify what clinical depression really is:

Depression is a mood disorder, which is a psychological disorder in which there's a disturbance in mood (duh) marked by prolonged emotion that impairs someone's entire emotional state.

Depressive disorders are mood disorders in which someone suffers depression without ever experiencing mania. The two types of depressive disorders are major depressive disorder and dysthymic disorder.

Major depressive disorder is characterized by a major depressive episode (of at least two weeks' duration) and depressed characteristics, like lethargy and hopelessness.

Symptoms include:

- Depressed mood most of the day
- Reduced interest or pleasure in all or most activities
- Significant weight loss or gain or significant decrease or interest in appetite
- Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
- Agitation or retardation in muscular activity associated with mental processes
- Fatigue or loss of energy
- Feeling worthless or guilty in an excessive manner
- Problems in thinking, concentrating, or making decisions
- Recurrent thoughts of death/suicide

Five of these must be present in an episode to be considered as MDD.


I wrote an essay on dysthymia, so I might as well post that:

Dysthymic disorder is a type of depressive disorder, and thus falls under the spectrum of mood disorders. It’s generally characterized by a chronically depressive mood that lasts for at least two years as an adult or one year as an adolescent. Unlike major depressive disorder, dysthymia involves no major symptoms so much as a continual day-to-day lifestyle of disrupted sleep patterns, increased or decreased appetite, difficulty making decisions, poor concentration, feelings of hopelessness, poor self-image, and drained energy (to be classified as dysthymia, two of these symptoms must occur, and they must not be absent for more than two months at a time). Despite no major depressive episodes, the long-lasting accumulative effects of these seemingly mild symptoms include work impairments, social isolation, and even high rates of suicide. An individual is not considered to have dysthymic disorder if his or her symptoms fall under the larger context of cyclothymic disorder or a chronic psychosis like delusional disorder or schizophrenia. Also, the individual’s symptoms cannot stem from the direct causation of general medical condition or the use of substances such as prescription medications. As with all psychological disorders, the symptoms must entail behavior that is deviant, maladaptive, or personally stressful.

As a mood disorder, dysthymia can involve a combination of biological, psychological, and sociocultural causes. Heredity has proved to play a strong role in acquiring mood disorders, as having a biological parent who suffers from a mood disorder drastically increases the risk of the offspring developing it as well. Those with mood disorders also exhibit several neurobiological abnormalities, including altered brain-wave activity during sleep, in which there is less slow-wave sleep and a quicker transition into REM sleep; thus, depressed individuals have trouble falling asleep and remaining asleep, and they wake up early in the morning feeling unrested and unable to fall back asleep. Additionally, depressed individuals exhibit constant hyperactivity in the endocrine system and a consequent inability to return to normal functioning after a stressful situation.

Psychologically, causes have been theorized in the psychodynamic, behavioral, and cognitive fields. Psychodynamic theorists suggest that depression is the manifestation of childhood experiences that hindered strong self-esteem. They also refer to Freud’s theory that depression is an internal clash of aggressive instincts and inability to openly express these feelings of frustration towards loved ones. Behavioral theorists suggest that stress leads people to withdraw inward, and the reduction of positive reinforcers that follows this leads to a spiral of only more withdrawing inward and more reduction of positive reinforcers, thus causing a self-perpetuating lifestyle of chronic depression. Behavioral theorists also emphasize the notion of learned helplessness, in which prolonged stress affects individuals with sentiments of unresponsive apathy and hopeless rumination. Cognitive theorists point out that depressed or even pessimistic individuals only think in negative terms, which thus only amplifies their depression.

A wide range of sociocultural factors can play a role in the development of dysthymia. Interpersonal relationships marked by an anxious, insecure attachment style are likely to cause depression, and a childhood of neglected love and attachment can develop a negative schema through which an individual interprets adult losses as extensions of childhood failure to develop enduring and close positive relationships. Additionally, a socioeconomic lifestyle of poverty poses many threats and stressors that make depression an easy trap to fall into. Also, the fast-paced, stressful lifestyles of industrialized, modernized societies increase individuals’ vulnerability to chronic depression.

Treatments for dysthymic disorder include both biological therapies and psychotherapy. Antidepressant drugs regulate mood, and include tricyclics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, but all three of these classes of drugs involve adverse side effects. Electroconvulsive therapy is sometimes used to treat severely depressed individuals, and although its administration involves little discomfort, its side effects of memory loss and other cognitive impairments is rather severe. Cognitive therapy is generally most preferable, for it strives to help change the mindsets of depressed individuals, and thus adverse side effects are nonexistent and relapse rates are low.


Also, there are three main classes of antidepressant drugs.

Tricyclics reduce symptoms in 60 to 70 percent of the cases, and they usually take 2 to 4 weeks to improve mood. But side effects include restlessness, faintness, trembling, sleepiness, and difficulty remembering.

MAO (monoamine oxidase) inhibitors are more toxic than tricyclics, but some people who don't respond to tricyclics do respond to MAO inhibitors. But MAO inhibitors can be especially risky because of their potential interactions with certain foods and drugs. Fermented foods like cheese and alcoholic beverages like red wine can interact with the MAO inhibitors to increase blood pressure and eventually cause a stroke.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) include Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft, and they're popular because they reduce the symptoms of depression with fewer side effects than the other antidepressants. Still, possible side effects include insomnia, anxiety, headache, and diarrhea (yeeeah). They can also impair sexual functioning and produce severe withdrawal symptoms if ended too abruptly.

So, if you feel you must use medication to resolve your depression problem, you might want to consult a doctor and see if any of the SSRIs would be right for you.

But to be honest, threadstarter, therapy is a very effective way of battling depression. There are many types of therapy available, and a collective approach to therapy will produce the most improvement.

Personally, I've had dysthymic depression for six years. And if you're like me, you won't want to communicate with anyone else about it, and you'd prefer to keep it to yourself. Now, if I were a professional psychologist, I'd ignore that and tell you to seek help anyways. But, as a fellow "person", some things I suggest to make you feel better about life are daily exercise (including both walking/jogging/running and weight training) and simply going outside to meditate. These are all simple, but extremely effective. Masturbation won't help you, I'm afraid. I don't care what endorphins it releases; lots of people masturbate daily and are depressed to the point of suicide.
Last edited by yawn at Oct 6, 2007,
#11
get more exercise, and seriously masturbation works, it releases endorphins that make you feel happy. Do something that gets your adrenaline going
#12
Quote by Slaytanic6606
Masturbate?

Makes me feel good.


Masturbation as a solution to depressed loneliness? That's a sure sign that you're a loser... (or a UGer... or both)
I play by my own rules. And I have one rule; There are no rules... but if there are, they're there to be broken. Even this one.


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#13
Go build a wooden go cart.
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#14
I'm the same dude, trust me. You need regular contact with at least 5 people, and you need to try to do some regular exercise.

Try meditating as well, it may seriously help
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#15
Learn to be content with yourself and everything around you. Try to teach yourself to accept the **** when it happens instead of letting yourself get worked up about it. I know it might seem like thats impossible, but its actually not. Its really a mind over matter thing combating these feelings your talking about. Just remember its your mind, its you, your depression is all in your head (well everything you experience is i suppose). When something ****ty that makes your depression worst happens try to put it in retrospect on a huge scale.

Manipulate your surroundings in your favor to make your life more pleasureable, but dont try to change what you cant change and youll be moderatly happier, or at least content.

But then again im not you....but that was things i started doing after spending my life from 13 to 16 feeling like you say your feeling and getting sick of it.
I know this seems ridiculous but i was able to control my feelings SO much more after trying a substance known as lsd (dont worry, you dont actually hallucinate on the drug unless your a complete idiot, you more notice things you didn't notice before like patterns in everything). It doesn't work for everyone, but the perspective it puts life in for you is the greatest feeling. Makes you content more than happy, but happy cant last forever. Content can.
#16
Well, my best advice is just don't like be silent about it. Talk to a friend or someone and I don't think taking anti-depressants is good idea until you're incredibly desperate. Yeah I think meditating is a good idea.
#18
Quote by Mr_Mysterio
Alright, so I think I have clinical depression, I'm sad all the time, and very few things cheer me up, I have no idea why though, could it be work? my current lack of a social life? (I see one person on a regular basis, one other person on a semi-regular basis) either way, I feel I need anti-depressants, but at the same time i'm not sure, I have a perscription, I just have to get it filled, comments? (perferably from people who have suffered from depression in the past, and what did you do about it?)


I've suffered from depression and let me tell you, NEVER use prescription anti-depressants unless you have no other choice, they can seriously **** you up mentally and don't actually fix anything. I went through several long periods of depression a year ago and let me tell you, you will feel better and the depression will go away, just give it time.

Theres nothing you can do to make depression go away just like that, you need to just let it work its self out. But, theres plenty you can do to speed up the process and avoid falling into those deep, dark holes of sadness and despair that I bet you encounter every so often. Do things that make you happy, try new stuff, accomplish things (homework, learn songs, exc.) and avoid just sitting around because if you do that, you end up thinking about the things that are depressing you. Start exercising, it really feels good. Especially biking or running, because it gives you a chance to just wander and explore, and I personally find that to be very metitative. In regards to your social life, try talking to people at school more often, start a band, talk to that girl you like. Its okay to be shy, I'm shy as hell, but don't be secluded and withdrawn.

So yea, to sum that ****ing essay up, stay active and accomplish things, don't do nothing or take meds, exercise, and improve your social life.
Last edited by NorseGodofRock at Oct 6, 2007,
#19
Quote by NorseGodofRock
I've suffered from depression and let me tell you, NEVER use prescription anti-depressants unless you have no other choice, they can seriously **** you up mentally and don't actually fix anything. I went through several long periods of depression a year ago and let me tell you, you will feel better and the depression will go away, just give it time.

Theres nothing you can do to make depression go away just like that, you need to just let it work its self out. But, theres plenty you can do to speed up the process and avoid falling into those deep, dark holes of sadness and despair that I bet you encounter every so often. Do things that make you happy, try new stuff, and avoid just sitting around because if you do that, you end up thinking about the things that are depressing you. Start exorcising, especially biking or running, it really feels good. In regards to your social life, try talking to people at school more often, start a band, talk to that girl you like. Its okay to be shy, I'm shy as hell, but don't be secluded and withdrawn.
Exorcising?!
#20
Quote by Yakult
I'm the same dude, trust me. You need regular contact with at least 5 people, and you need to try to do some regular exercise.

Try meditating as well, it may seriously help


meditation for the win. Helped me out tons, not only with depression but with anger issues as well. And yeah, get some contact WITH PEOPLE YOU LIKE AND DISLIKE! Make sure it's at least a 4:1 ratio and at the most 3:2, you need contact with annoying people, I'm not joking at all.
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#22
According to yawn's hugely long and informative post (which I am not quoting because it's so big my internet freezes when I try to), I actually qualify for clinical depression. In a viciously ironic twist, this thought depresses me.
I play by my own rules. And I have one rule; There are no rules... but if there are, they're there to be broken. Even this one.


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#23
Alright, thanks everyone for advice, I can't really go out right now seeing as i'm in my Pj's cause of my laundry, but once that's done i'll be sure to go out and do something.
That is not dead which can eternal lie
And with strange aeons even death may die


IA! IA! CTHULHU FHTAGN!
#24
Quote by break-me-in
According to yawn's hugely long and informative post (which I am not quoting because it's so big my internet freezes when I try to), I actually qualify for clinical depression. In a viciously ironic twist, this thought depresses me.
Well, the last paragraph of my post should hopefully offer some solace. It's better to be aware so you can battle it effectively.
#25
Quote by yawn
Well, the last paragraph of my post should hopefully offer some solace. It's better to be aware so you can battle it effectively.


Is it possible that I could just qualify for it but not actually have it? Somehow?
I play by my own rules. And I have one rule; There are no rules... but if there are, they're there to be broken. Even this one.


Confused? Good.

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Sigs are wastes of my precious screen space.

^ Irony

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#26
Quote by break-me-in
Is it possible that I could just qualify for it but not actually have it? Somehow?
Well, having the symptoms should be reason enough for wanting to improve your condition. =/
#27
Quote by yawn
Well, having the symptoms should be reason enough for wanting to improve your condition. =/


Yeah... I just don't really want to actually be able to refer to myself as "clinically depressed". I'm still gonna try and do something about it.
I play by my own rules. And I have one rule; There are no rules... but if there are, they're there to be broken. Even this one.


Confused? Good.

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Sigs are wastes of my precious screen space.

^ Irony

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LET ME HUMP YOU DAMMIT
#28
**** prozac/drugs, I got offered them once.

Not the answer.

Remove the negative elements from your life, make yourself more social, more guitar, more good music, etc.
#29
Quote by Jackolas
**** prozac/drugs, I got offered them once.


Totally. Don't do drugs of any kind, legal or illegal. I'm not one of those anti-drug zelots but to be honest, ALL drugs, including liquor and weed, **** with your head and can throw you deeper into depression. Put off getting drunk or high until you start feeling better and NEVER take prescription anti-depressants of any kind.
#30
Well, anti-depressants have helped a lot of people who weren't responsive to other types of treatments. They certainly have their appropriate function when necessary.
#31
Electro-shock therapy.


It works.
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#32
Quote by NorseGodofRock
Totally. Don't do drugs of any kind, legal or illegal. I'm not one of those anti-drug zelots but to be honest, ALL drugs, including liquor and weed, **** with your head and can throw you deeper into depression. Put off getting drunk or high until you start feeling better and NEVER take prescription anti-depressants of any kind.


I do tend to agree mate.

Maybe in some cases though as Yawn said, prozac (and others) can help.

They are not a wonder drug as some assume though, and it's scary how easy it is to get put on it.
#33
Quote by ProjectDark
Electro-shock therapy.


It works.
Indeed; it actually is pretty effective. But there are possible side effects of memory loss and cognitive impairments. But its beneficial effects appear in a matter of days, so you might want to consider it if you don't want to put the effort into cognitive therapy.
#34
Quote by Jackolas
I do tend to agree mate.

Maybe in some cases though as Yawn said, prozac (and others) can help.

They are not a wonder drug as some assume though, and it's scary how easy it is to get put on it.


They CAN help if you have exhausted every other option, but it is essentially like taking weight loss pills when you could just exercise and eat healthy.

I've heard some bad stories about how its pushed people further into depression and messed them up. My friend was on them once awhile ago and he's never been the same...
#35
Just like everyone else said.

You need excercise and a social life. Don't masturbate. It can become an addiction and cause you to get pissed off and agitated without it.
#36
Quote by thefedexpope

You need excercise and a social life. Don't masturbate. It can become an addiction and cause you to get pissed off and agitated without it.


Everyone masturbates. It releases pressure and makes you feel good and is perfectly healthy. Just don't over do it, once a day is perfectly fine.
#37
Quote by NorseGodofRock
They CAN help if you have exhausted every other option, but it is essentially like taking weight loss pills when you could just exercise and eat healthy.

I've heard some bad stories about how its pushed people further into depression and messed them up. My friend was on them once awhile ago and he's never been the same...


I don't think they do anyone any favours really. I know of a girl who made public on her myspace i stumbled across she was on prozac and sleeping pills (though in a small blog, so not like absolutely shouting about it). I don't mean to sound like a tit but after reading that it was all so obvious, you know? Not great really. They do have long term effects and coming off them is a challenge I would imagine.
#38
Quote by Jackolas
I don't think they do anyone any favours really. I know of a girl who made public on her myspace i stumbled across she was on prozac and sleeping pills (though in a small blog, so not like absolutely shouting about it). I don't mean to sound like a tit but after reading that it was all so obvious, you know? Not great really. They do have long term effects and coming off them is a challenge I would imagine.

I actually heard (from an extremley reliable sourse) that coming off Anti-Depressants is easy if they fixed you, basically if they "fixed" you, you don't need them anymore, so you're happy, or "content" either way. Things are starting to look up for me, i'm thinking of joining something (bowling league, gun club, looks more like the bowling league cause guns are expensive, and bowling is a little more social), and if that still dosen't make me feel better, anti-deps are my last resort. And to answer Kensais question, I'm an electrician, but I don't really like it as much as I did when I first started it. Really wierd/long hours, hard, dirty work, and my bosses are really wierd.
That is not dead which can eternal lie
And with strange aeons even death may die


IA! IA! CTHULHU FHTAGN!
#39
Dont take anti-depressants. You have to come off them eventually, and when you do, it'll all flood back.
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