#1
good or bad?

yeah i've been playing for about 6 months now lol and im playing on a squire not an electric if that helps
#2
edit: lol i didnt even read your post. so here is my post, but with a little extra adde din the beginning:

well its not necessarily bad, but they should come. have you done a lot of working involving your hands before? heres some things you could do:


get some really heavy gauge strings. that helps. lol.

or put super glue on your finger tips.

or just wait it out and hope they come
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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Last edited by InanezGuitars44 at Oct 7, 2007,
#5
Stop washing your hands... Well not entirely lol. Just don't do it before or after you play for a little while.
-Denny
PRS Singlecut Trem

Member #2 of the Coheed and Cambria fanclub, PM dementedpuppy to join.
#6
lol i had the same problem. oddly enough after i havent played for abit they recently started forming :S

but its a pain though, tbh before calluses I would get tender fingers from playing for a few hours.. but now sliding actaully feels like a physical pain, as in an actual cut... prior to calluses all i would get is tender tips from the constant pushing down pressure on one spot...
#7
i played acoustic be4, and now my fingers are really strong, besides my pinky.
#8
You just got to keep playing. And if you're not playing and you're watching tv sitting on the couch or something, have the guitar in your lap as if you're going to play it and just have you fingers press firmly against the strings. A couple hours of that each day plus your actual practice time should make the calluses form faster.
#9
Start on acoustic and raise your action on your electric so you have to press down harder.
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#10
Some people don't form them as thick as others. You probably have very fine callouses on top of you fingers. Mine aren't too thick, and I play the classical guitar, which has strings much thicker than electrics. Soooo...
#11
Don't worry about it. If you're not forming calluses, you probably don't need them. They start to form when you feel your fingers hurting, and if your fingers aren't hurting, you don't need them that bad.
I'm a communist. Really.