#1
My ashton p bass knock off has 500k pots instead of 250 k pots i discovered this after i rewired it and accually read what it said on the pots what will the difference be with single coil Pick ups it has a very bright sound for something thats had the frets ripped outta it
so whats the difference between 250k and 500k pots

thanks in advanced
I am me. Live with it.
#2
Legend has it tha 500k pots give a brighter sound.

Fender use 250k
Gibson use 500k

So from then on, it's the standard to believe that you use 250k with single coils (which are bright enough on their own) and 500k with humbuckers (to add a bit more high end).
#3
ahhh ok kool thanks for the helpthought that was it so it adds more high end thanks man
I am me. Live with it.
#5
Quote by sashki
Legend has it tha 500k pots give a brighter sound.

Fender use 250k
Gibson use 500k

So from then on, it's the standard to believe that you use 250k with single coils (which are bright enough on their own) and 500k with humbuckers (to add a bit more high end).

the reason they give a "brighter" sound is that higher rating pots bleed less treble than lower rated pots. Humbuckers don't really have a lot of treble to bleed so if you put pots lower than 500k in a humbuckers circuit, it will just sound muffled. if you use 500k pots in a guitar with single coils, it will sound a little bit brighter, although its not going to make that much difference as 250ks don't bleed that much treble from lower output pickups like single coils, which is why often companies will just use 500k pots in every guitar.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.