#1
I've been playing for quite a while now, but am trying to get to grips with the theory side. I understand the Minor Pentatonic scale has 5 positions: E, D, C, A and G.
Which one is used for what though? Do you use for instance position A for playing in the key of A, and if that is the case then what position would you use if playing in the key of B for instance?
I'm finding the theory side of life heavy going, but i want to improve so any help from you lovely people out there would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
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#2
Each minor pentatonic scale (A, B, C, C#, Gb, etc.) has it's own set of notes which can be played all over the fretboard. Scales are neither box patterns nor positions on the fretboard.
#3
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
Each minor pentatonic scale (A, B, C, C#, Gb, etc.) has it's own set of notes which can be played all over the fretboard. Scales are neither box patterns nor positions on the fretboard.



I'm afraid you lost me there Kirby, are you saying that the Minor Pentatonic has "more" than 5 positions?
My gear:
Fender 50th anniv American Strat Deluxe NICE
Fender Eric johnson Strat SEXY
Gibson SG Special Gothic II RAW
Ibanez JS 1000 VERSATILE
Gibson Les Paul Custom OOH BABY
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Head & Cab LET'S ROCK
#4
He's saying that talking about "positions" sin't the right approach. A scale is just a fixed set of intervals, and can be used with any root note, and played all over the neck.
#5
Quote by Hammy

I'm finding the theory side of life heavy going, but i want to improve so any help from you lovely people out there would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.


It's not really theory. The 5 positions are basically just different ways of playing the
same scale. They are the fingering patterns to use to play the scale anywhere on
the neck. Don't get all caught up that the root note always has to start on the
6th string with your index finger. It doesn't. It can be anywhere in the pattern.
#6
Quote by Hammy
I'm afraid you lost me there Kirby, are you saying that the Minor Pentatonic has "more" than 5 positions?


Well for starters, it would have 12 'positions', but scales are not positions on the fretboard. The pentatonic scale is five notes. (See: Penta, greek, which means "five".) You shouldn't think of them as positions, but rather five notes you can play to make a scale.
#7
All 5 "positions" are just bits of the same scale...like everyones said a scale isn't a fingering pattern, or a box, it's just a pattern of notes. In the case of the minor pentatonic there's just 5 notes in a repeating pattern. The boxes are really only there to help illustrate where the scale occurs and also help as navigational aids when playing.

However, to actually LEARN the scale you need to learn the notes in it, remember, in the minor pentatonic there's only 5 notes, they just keep repeating. For whati it's worth, here's E minor pent...

http://www.theorylessons.com/pentpos.html

Remember, it's the NOTES that are important, not the fingering...as far as scales go where you put your fingers is the least important thing.
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#8
Thanks people, it makes a lot more sense to me now, cheers
My gear:
Fender 50th anniv American Strat Deluxe NICE
Fender Eric johnson Strat SEXY
Gibson SG Special Gothic II RAW
Ibanez JS 1000 VERSATILE
Gibson Les Paul Custom OOH BABY
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Head & Cab LET'S ROCK