#1
i my current setup consists of a kustom high voltage amplifier and vintage advanced 1 les paul type. I love my amp and my guitar so i do not want to change. However i have a lot of tunning stability problems and was wondering what i could do inorder to redtify the problem.

I also want a new set of pickups however i am confused by the amount of them . I would live a pickup suitable ofr metallica and rock such as ac/dc and blues such eric clapton. any advice would be appreciated.

And are active pickups better than passive?
if you dont like me kiss my arss
#2
try rubbing a pencil in the nut slots and thicker strings.
if that doesn't work, get new tuners.

actives aren't better than passives, they're just different.
give this a read

Passive Pickup Systems
All basses and guitars generate an output signal by means of a pickup that translates some of the vibration energy of the strings in to voltage that gets sent to an amp. ?Passive? instruments send this raw signal to the amp, and passive volume and tone controls can only attenuate the signal and treble response, that is, make it quieter. In order for passive magnetic pickups to generate enough voltage to drive an amplifier, they must be wound with a large number of turns of wire. This causes high inductance in the coil, and a high impedance output signal. This has the effect of rolling off the extreme high and low frequency response and making the signal more susceptible to loss and degradation in the cable on the way to the amp. While this sounds bad, it?s one of the reasons passive pickups can sound ?punchier?, because the ear perceives more midrange when the high treble and low bass are rolled off. The powerful magnets and larger wire coils in passive pickups can also produce strange electromagnetic interactions with the strings and adjacent pickup coils, causing irregular response curves and dynamic effects usually not seen in active pickups. Both of these factors contribute to the unique voice and continued popularity of passive pickups.

Active Pickup Systems
These generally use low-impedance pickups with a smaller number of wire turns. This causes less loss in the high and low end, and generally allows a much broader, full-range, hi-fi sound. Unfortunately, it also means the voltage produced by the pickup is very low, not nearly enough to drive an amp through a long cable. So these pickups have miniature amplifiers, called preamps, built into the pickup housing itself.
Last edited by The red Strat. at Oct 8, 2007,
#3
Id say new tuners or some nut lube. look around for it. Tuners definately would fix ur problems. or maybe u just need to change strings??
#4
by the way the amps name is high voltage
if you dont like me kiss my arss
#5
^^ hehe nut lube...
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#6
Quote by nimble
by the way the amps name is high voltage

oh damn i got pwnd
i heard that being used by another guy yesterday, i thought you made the same mistake.
#7
(to the nut lube bit)

seriously, though, do what red strat says. Also, check your stringing technique, that could be at fault more than the guitar- i thought those Vintage Advances had graphite nuts and good quality tuners?

I haven't tried the av1, but the other vintage advances I've tried had pretty nice pickups. You could get better, but if you ask me, wouldn't really be the best use of your available funds. You could get a 5 watt tube amp (peavey valveking royal 8, epi valve junior, fender champion 600) for the price of new pickups, if not less, and that'd be a much more sensible choice, especially since you play blues and classic rock. That type of music is crying out for a tube amp.

I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Oct 8, 2007,
#8
thank but dont really want to change my amps so il think about buying some locking tunners. The g string seems to have the biggest problem for some reason the others seem fine.
are they the best option or could some one recomend a good make.
if you dont like me kiss my arss
#9
as i've said check your tuning technique... but locking tuners should speed up the restringing process, so may be worth it. EDIT: just make sure they're a straight swap etc., i have no idea about that, unfortunately.

I can't in good conscience recommend new pickups, because for the type of music you want to play, a new amp would be an infinitely better idea. as I said, assuming your guitar has a similar quality of pickups to the other vintage advances, the pickups aren't the problem if you aren't getting the tones you want.

I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
ensure your windings around yor posts are right. not too many, not too few. usually three winds for bass strings, 4 for treble. when you string through the post, go about 1.5 peg-distance then crimp there, for treble strings 2 peg distances. that should give you accurate windings. and make sure the windings are uniform and neat looking. odd friction and odd points will give you erratic tuning. then graphite your nut. THEN replace your tuners. in that order. graphite is always a good idea anyway, even on already-satisfactory tuning guitars. new tuners will only change your ratio, since im sure the ones on there arent that bad in the first place. for a bridge pup, try the gibson 500T. really good for classic rock and great for driving tube amps (when you end up getting one. and you will end up getting one). for the neck, depends on what you want, but for blues i would reccomend a bucker sized P90 like the one seymour duncan makes. burstbuckers never hurt either, they're good and well balanced and very harmonic.
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#12
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?