#1
I have recently started playing guitar again after not playing for close to 10 years. The problem I had before I stopped playing and still do now is speed and accuracy when I try to do scales and solo's.

My question to anyone who has hit this wall and overcame it...what did you do to get over this slump? Is it just a matter of practice, practice, practice to build up the speed? I am at the point thinking that my fingers just can't physically move any faster.
#2
its definately a matter of practice practice practice. look-up finger excercises and do those. i just start with open low E and then hit the first fret second fret third and fourth then move down to the next string. once i hit all the notes on the six strings i move down the fret and do that all the way to the 12th fret. then do alternate picking. then do it backwards. eventually your hands will be broken in.
#3
You aren't practicing right. My guess would be you're pretty much always playing the same stuff again and again, right?
You should constantly challenge yourself, and if you at first fail your own challenge, don't give up.

Start out with some songs that could improve your speed and methods. Depending on your skill, you could for instance try out some Pantera. Get guitar pro, set it to "Speed Trainer", and just play the same song over and over again. Pantera is great because it builds both speed and accuracy without you having to play any difficult scales.

Then, when speed and accuracy comes more naturally to you, try jamming along to some backtracks. Try to continuously challenge yourself, but don't stop if you fail. Just keep playing. You'll get it sometime.
#4
Once you get the basics, I have found that if I look closely at how I am doing a run, I can usually find a more "economical" way to execute it which improves speed.

I would love to see a time and motion study done on one of the more "gifted" guitarists out there. It would be interesting...at least for me.

I hope that makes sense??

Chris
Last edited by RCShadow at Oct 9, 2007,
#5
I imagine that you are more skilled than I am as I'm not quite up to the "soloing" stage yet. But some advice I read here sounds really helpful in this regard. Don't just hit the strings over and over, think about hitting the strings cleanly and firmly, taking it slow and speed it up when you are hitting it accurately. I'm in the process of practicing scales, and I'm slowing it down, not just trying to hit the strings, but hitting them in the right place on my finger, keeping proper finger position. The theory goes, once you finger get the correct muscle memory for accuracy, it's much easier to speed it up.
#6
Quote by rhettro
I imagine that you are more skilled than I am as I'm not quite up to the "soloing" stage yet. But some advice I read here sounds really helpful in this regard. Don't just hit the strings over and over, think about hitting the strings cleanly and firmly, taking it slow and speed it up when you are hitting it accurately. I'm in the process of practicing scales, and I'm slowing it down, not just trying to hit the strings, but hitting them in the right place on my finger, keeping proper finger position. The theory goes, once you finger get the correct muscle memory for accuracy, it's much easier to speed it up.


Yep. This is sound advice. I remember last year having to s-l-o-w down and take my time. At one point, I was constantly having to remind myself this and go back to the basics. Being only a year into this, I still do from time to time. Just remember, we all get there at our own pace, don't try and keep up with the Jones' on this one.

Chris