#1
Can anyone tell me what this symbol at the end of the bar means?

Many thanks .

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#2
That's the strangest thing I've ever seen...
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#5
looks like vibrato on top of a quarter note

not 100% sure, i have never seen it before
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#6
Damn man, looks like a mistake to me. I can honestly say I've never seen that symbol before.
#8
It's sure as hell not a mistake, as it's repeated 15 times. It's probably Glissando.
In the bass chat:

<Jon> take the quote of me out your sig plx
<Jon> i hate seeing what i said around lol


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And now on BANDCAMP!


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#11
Wow...something I don't know exactly. This is for guitar, correct? If it was for a wind/brass instrument, it could be a lift or flutter-tongue.

It could be just a mistakenly placed portamento.
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#12
quote from my sister whos a harpist(they use lots of glissandos) and goes to a music school


'well that is a gliss, just a small one'
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#15
Glissando. When transcribing music, you could use virtually any thing to denote something as long as you make a reference point some where with a key table, but it's much better to of course use what has become the standard, and this is standard, I've seen this gliss mark appear even above the stave and below as well as on the note.
Last edited by ray555 at Oct 10, 2007,
#16
It looks like it could be a glissando, but don't they require starting and ending notes? In other words, how do you perform a glissando on one note?
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#17
It looks like it could be a glissando, but don't they require starting and ending notes? In other words, how do you perform a glissando on one note?

+1
I looked everywhere,but nothin...
#18
you gotta take that to some piano teacher...thats sure as hell uncommon!
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#19
Definitely a glissando

Edit: and no, glissandoes do not require a starting note.


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Last edited by Zeelod at Oct 10, 2007,
#20
Quote by Zeelod
Definitely a glissando. Edit: and no, glissandoes do not require a starting note.
Thanks - that makes sense, come to think of it. So, does this notation mark the beginning or ending note? Or perhaps does it indicate a glissando that simply contains this note, regardless of a beginning or ending point?

It's starting to feel like we're debating how many angels can dance on the head of a pin
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- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#21
Heres the rule for most glisses written without a beginning note, or one written without an ending note. The pitch the gliss begins on is the line where it begins on if your not given the beginning. If you don't have the ending note, then its the note is the where the glissando ends. In your specific case it looks like it would begin at E and gliss and octave up. Sometimes these things aren't very specific and are more of a suggestion of how to preform it, which is how some ornamentation is written.
#22
Quote by Windwaker
Sometimes these things aren't very specific and are more of a suggestion of how to preform it, which is how some ornamentation is written.


Amen, end of.