#1
I'm tring to record 60's style vintage hard rock guitar for my next project. I'm wondering if the guitar or the amp is more important to get the sound of 60's rock. I can spend 5G to 10G for the amp, cab and guitar. Since guitar player is young, he only has a cheap Stratocaster and a modern amp. I already have pro recording equipments in my studio, such as Royer, Neve, API, Protools etc.

$2000 repro Stratocaster and $4000 67' Plexi with $2000 vintage 4x12 cab

or

$8000 64' stratocaster with $1000 small vintage combo amp (like Jimmy Page Supro)

or

$4000 75 stratocaster with $4000 72' JMP with $1000 70' cab

or what?
Last edited by kaigen at Oct 9, 2007,
#3
O.o wowz0rz
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#6
The amp is definitely going to be more important than the guitar. I think a Plexi would do the trick just fine. Good luck finding a Supro amp like Page's, he has even said he was never able to find another one
#7
hendrix pugnap.... used a strat and he is the greatest guitarist of all time. and my opinion is fact btw
#8
I like something similar to option one.

Get a high quality stratocaster, maybe put in a nice set of boutique, custom wound vintage-style pickups, and you're set for guitars.

A plexi style amp is going to work excellently for you, and as long as you have a high quality cab with greenbacks, you should be set.
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#9
Quote by SRVStrat808
I like something similar to option one.

Get a high quality stratocaster, maybe put in a nice set of boutique, custom wound vintage-style pickups, and you're set for guitars.

A plexi style amp is going to work excellently for you, and as long as you have a high quality cab with greenbacks, you should be set.


+1 to the first combination. You'll probably get what you're after w/ a '67 or '68 plexi.
I'd recommend the model 1987 50W version w/ greenback-equipped cab as stated above. The amp/cab combination is crucial to the sound, probably 90% worth. Almost any decent guitar w/ quality pickups will get you there if you have the right amp/cab.
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#10
Thank you for your opinion. Since I'm not a guitar player, I was wondering how guitar itself has an impact to overall sound. Now I'm scratching my head wondering why people pays such a big money for the pre-CBS stratocaster if it's not so important as amp. Collectors value, maybe...

Then, I can just ask this young guitar player to buy some boutique pickups. He loves his guitar and I know I should respect it, so his guitar with real Plexi would sound just fine
Last edited by kaigen at Oct 9, 2007,
#11
Who is all of this for, and who's paying?

Just get a Les Paul and a JTM45 combo.
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#12
If you really do have that kind of money, and you have your own studio, wouldn't it be better to buy two different amps and two different guitars? Surely a wider range of tones and such would be more practical and useful for recording? Imagine having a Plexi and a Twin Reverb, for example, and an SG and a Strat? You'd nail pretty much everything in that period.
#13
Nice budget man!
I'd recomend an old AC-30 or Hiwatt stack along with a good pre-CBS Strat (but if he's really happy with the Strat he has now, that should be fine). You could even try out some good fuzz pedals and whatnot.

Instead of a Strat though, have you ever thought of getting a Rickenbacker of any kind?

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#14
Quote by R_H_C_P
Who is all of this for, and who's paying?

Just get a Les Paul and a JTM45 combo.

agreed.

are there JTM45 COMBO's ?? or do you mean a bluesbreaker ?

TS, a les paul or an ES 335 and a marshall JTM45 (or marshall bluesbreaker) and a greenback equipped cab will scream vintage rock tone.
Last edited by The red Strat. at Oct 10, 2007,
#15
The Bluesbreakers are JTM45 combos, yea.
"Breathe, breathe in the air
Don't be afraid to care"

Fender Strat/Tokai LS80>few pedals>Orange Rocker 30
#16
How close to the original 60s sound does this need to be?

If it has to be identical, then buy the vintage gear from the time...
If not, you could do it for a lot less then 5Gs!
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#17
I researched a little today. How about this combination?

Marshall 1972 Superlead or Superbass + 70's cab with greenbacks : I know JTM45 is better, but Superleads are much cheaper and they sound great on some Youtube clips that I checked today.

DAM or original Tonebender : It seems like I need one of those. Original Tonebender is sooo expexnsive.

Guitar or pickup : I don't know which pickup I should buy. There are a few original Fender strat pickup from 60's on Ebay for about $300, but they all look like fake. Are they really original? Someone suggested me G&L guitars for vintage strat sound. I checked their web site but their demo does not sound like vintage at all to my ear, although they sound great. ALL of Fender custom shop guitars on Youtube sounds bad to my ear.... Maybe players are bad.
Last edited by kaigen at Oct 11, 2007,
#18
Remember that it's not just the guitar and amp - recording gear was different back in the 60s, and that accounted for some of the sound...
#19
^ Agreed!

Also, don't always go by Youtube videos, they sound can be really different to live sound. Like, if it's recorded through a bad microphone, that'll ultimately affect the way the amp sounds to you. I'm not sure how else you could get an idea of how they sound though sinse you aren't a guitar player and that they're hard-to-find amps...

And yeah, people cash out big money on pre-CBS Strats because they're pre-CBS Strats. Granted, they could sound a lot better than some newer Strats, but the price tag comes from investment and collectors value.
Gonna Leave this town

Gotta leave this town

Gonna make a whole lotta money

Gonna be big yeah...
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#20
Quote by Don_Humpador
If you really do have that kind of money, and you have your own studio, wouldn't it be better to buy two different amps and two different guitars? Surely a wider range of tones and such would be more practical and useful for recording? Imagine having a Plexi and a Twin Reverb, for example, and an SG and a Strat? You'd nail pretty much everything in that period.


I agree with this, too. There was a lot of gear floating about throughout that period, and it's hard to put down the sound of an era to just one guitar and one amp. Also, you have to consider the fact that there were distinct differences between American bands' sounds and British bands' sounds, so having one American-voiced amp and one British-voiced amp would be advantageous - making Don Humpador's suggestions good 'uns