#1
Hey guys

i've got an Epiphone dot es 335 with stopbar tailpiece and gibson tune-o-matic bridge.
I just got it set up with ernie ball regular slinkys (10-48).

the action though, turned out a little low. Theres no buzzing of course and its easy to play but the tone has trebbled out too much (become a bit snappy) and i wanted to raise my action a bit to deepen the tone.

The problem is i've raised the action and changed the intonation by moving the bridge such that the string length is longer so that the strings don't go sharp when i press down on the high frets, but i've lengthened the strings to their limit (the individual saddles wont go any further back) and the action is still quite low.

The guy who did my setup said that even if i moved my action up from the way he set it it'd put out my intonation a bit.

is there anyway i can raise my action more without screwing up the guitars intonation?
And what other things should i keep in mind when changing action?
#2
Simple: if you change the action you need to alter your intonation. That's just the way life is. Sorry.
#3
Quote by C_Turton
Simple: if you change the action you need to alter your intonation. That's just the way life is. Sorry.


I've changed the action on my guitars, without changing the intonation? and not noticed an side effects on the intonation.
#4
if you look under your saddles, youll see on either side of your bridge scews that hold the saddle peice up, turn them and they will raise.... at least thats what happens with my gretsch with the bigsby tail peice
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#5
not noticed or not had? Every time I change the action on a guitar i also need to do the intonation. Check your 19th fret against the 19th fret harmonic. There will be a difference, unless your intonation was out to begin with, in which case you might just get lucky.
#6
just raise the action untill you like it, then simply adjust the intonation. it's not that much work ya know. just start doing it already.
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#7
C Turton is right.

I'm not sure raising the action will be the right thing for you anyway. You don't get a deaper sound from having high action, it just gives you more power and more sustain. If you want a mellow, full body sound then high action might help but so could lowering the pickups.
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#8
Something I think is still unsaid: If you really want to get your saddles further back, flip them.
#9
Quote by CorduroyEW
C Turton is right.

I'm not sure raising the action will be the right thing for you anyway. You don't get a deaper sound from having high action, it just gives you more power and more sustain. If you want a mellow, full body sound then high action might help but so could lowering the pickups.


Hey yeah thats what a meant, more power and more sustain sorry if i was unclear

in terms of having to change intonation

the particular that are giving me grief are the g and b string ones and i cant change them anymore because they've been pushed back as far as they can go and wont budge any more
#10
That's why you should read what I posted and just go ahead and flip the saddles.
#12
Quote by ovenfoot
Hey guys
the action though, turned out a little low. Theres no buzzing of course and its easy to play but the tone has trebbled out too much (become a bit snappy) and i wanted to raise my action a bit to deepen the tone.

you could just lower the pickups
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#13
Quote by ovenfoot
thanks man
how do i do it for an individual string?

It varies with different manufacturers, but you can always take the saddle off one way or another. What you do is slacken the string you need some extra length on and pull it off to the side of the saddle. Examine your bridge closely and see if you can figure out what holds the intonation screw in place. With mine it's this little bent piece of wire that I can remove with needle nose pliers. Once you get at whatever mechanism is used on yours, you'll be able to actually screw the intonation screw right out of the bridge, releasing the saddle. Then you flip it 180° so it slants the other way (the slope should now face the neck, not the ass) and reinsert the screw. This will win you something like 1,5-2 milimeters...

edit: However, if you need to do it on the majority or all of your strings, I'd suggest flipping the entire bridge instead.
Last edited by Pikka Bird at Oct 10, 2007,
#15
Didn't he already reply to that? Anyways, the above advice is nice to know, for future reference.
#16
Quote by C_Turton
not noticed or not had? Every time I change the action on a guitar i also need to do the intonation. Check your 19th fret against the 19th fret harmonic. There will be a difference, unless your intonation was out to begin with, in which case you might just get lucky.

don't you mean 12th fret?
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#17
Quote by Blompcube
don't you mean 12th fret?


Speaking for someone else is always a dicey business, but I'll risk it.

He means the 19th fret.
It's closer to the bridge, so any error in length will be more noticeable than at the 12th.
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