#1
I don't see what is so bad about anchoring. I use a combination of anchoring and free hand when I play, and I've never experienced any problems. As far as I can see, here is a list of the pros and cons of anchoring

PROS
-Gives you a stable point from which to pivot your wrist
-Distributes picking tension evenly between wrist and fingers
-Allows for an even pick attack on every string (not a different angle of incidence on every string)
-Allows MUCH more pick control


I don't mean to sound sarcastic, but I must have been because this thread just got locked. I'll repost it I guess.

I'm really wondering, this is not a flame thread, so LAY OFF, MODS
#2
The first one got closed for a reason.

But, go ahead and get carpal tunnel.
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#4
Quote by zeppelin470
How will I get carpal tunnel from anchoring?

You are putting weight on your pinky alone. Not good.
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#5
I don't anchor with my pinky, though. I anchor with my wrist very lightly above the strings, sort of close to the bridge.
#6
Quote by zeppelin470
I don't anchor with my pinky, though. I anchor with my wrist very lightly above the strings, sort of close to the bridge.

I don't call that an anchor then.

I call that muting. After all, thats where everyone puts their right hand to roll palm mutes on and off.
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#8
Also- I don't personally do this, but I've heard it's also bad: anchoring on the bridge. What's bad about that?
#9
Quote by zeppelin470
But I'm not muting the strings at all...

they sustain and ring just fine

Well if you aren't muting it's a very normal right hand position. And it's not anchoring either. Where else would your hand be to hit the strings?

Quote by zeppelin470
Also- I don't personally do this, but I've heard it's also bad: anchoring on the bridge. What's bad about that?

Dunno. I believe anchoring slows down or limits your playability.
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#11
Quote by zeppelin470
I don't understand your question...
sorry

Your hand/wrist is beside the bridge, above the strings.

Thats where it's supposed to be. That is NOT anchoring.
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#12
Quote by zeppelin470

PROS
-Gives you a stable point from which to pivot your wrist
-Distributes picking tension evenly between wrist and fingers
-Allows for an even pick attack on every string (not a different angle of incidence on every string)
-Allows MUCH more pick control


1. Causes friction when you pivot your wrist. Friction=tension=less speed.
2. Floating distributes tension between fingers, wrist, elbow, and shoulder, which equals less tension for each joint.
3. If your hand is stuck in one spot, how can you get the same pick attack on all strings?
4. Floating actually gives you more pick control. The thing is most people try anchoring for a few days and say "this doesn't work". But if you had the same amount of practice time floating as you did anchoring, your speed and accuracy would be many times better floating than anchored.

Now read this thread, it's there for a reason:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=339913&highlight=Anchor
#14
Quote by zeppelin470
What exactly is anchoring?


Putting weight on your pinky! Like I said.
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#16
Quote by zeppelin470
That's all? I though it was anchoring if you anchored any part of your hand/wrist anywhere

I can't quite imagine how you can anchor with your wrist...that would look silly now, wouldn't it?
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#18
Quote by zeppelin470
it seems to look natural....

maybe not though

Keeping your wrist glued down to where that guys pinky is in the photo? I think not.
Axe FX 2
Matrix GT1000FX
Mesa 4x12
Behringer FCB1010
#19
AFAIK anchoring is generally taken to mean keeping any of your picking hand fingers (except the finger on the pick, typically index) placed on the guitar below the strings, or perhaps even underneath. This effectively creates a pivot point, or an anchor.

It makes it a lot easier to damage your hand in some way or develop RSI/carpal tunnel as typically people apply a fair bit of pressure, which creates tension, which is bad for speed, etc.

That's how I think of it, sorry if it's not too clear. Not anchoring is often considered good technique, though much debated. And obviously there are famous exceptions, like Petrucci, but he knows what he's doing.
Last edited by codybcool at Oct 10, 2007,
#20
FWIW, Here's my definition of anchoring taken from another thread. It's a
practical definition based on what you're doing....


If you want avoid any confusion about what you, personally are doing, there's
a very simple test you can do on your own. If you're honest with yourself, it
will make it pretty clear if you are using the guitar to stabilize your hand because
you lack good arm control. Ultimately, that's really what the only issue is with
anchoring no matter how you happen to define it.

Take something you know of moderate difficulty(for you). It can be anything --
a song, a scale, a pattern -- the only requirement is that it involve a lot of picking.
Play it as you normally would. However you feel comfortable. Now, make an
effort on purpose to keep your hand completely off the guitar and pick the same
thing. Are you missing more notes? Getting caught in the strings more? General
sense of less control?

The degree that you experience those things is about the degree to which you're
using the guitar as a crutch and lack arm control. If you want better arm control,
the best way to get it is practice without touching the guitar. Simple as that.
Once your control has developed, you'll most likely come to some new awarenesses
that have greatly improved your picking skill. Beyond that, it doesnt matter
what the hell you do.

I happen to think the effort is worth it. Otherwise you can watch Yngwie and
comfort yourself with the belief "if its ok for Yngwie its ok for me". Maybe it is.
But, I'd really have to wonder how much better Yngwie's arm control is than yours
and to what degree he's *relying* on stabilizing his hand on the guitar.
#21
Quote by zeppelin470
What exactly is anchoring?


Touching the guitar with the pinky is not anchoring unless it is FIXED there. Thats the real difference. If its fixed to the guitar, its anchoring. If it moves freely along with your hand.... its not.

I think alot of people are confused by this, and the long winded, condesending posts here make it even more difficult to understand, but its really a simple concept.


fixed to guitar = anchoring
#24
Quote by ibason
I can't believe there's another one of these.


Neither can I. We've be over this again and again, and still people argue with people who really know what they're doing about this.
#25
Quote by La Qotsa
I can't quite imagine how you can anchor with your wrist...that would look silly now, wouldn't it?

On a LP or another guitar with a similar fixed brige (what are those things called, tune-o-matics? Something like that), you'd be able to put your wrist on the strings behind the tune-o-matic, like you were muting your strings. My old guitar teacher told me to try it, I was never ever comfortable with it, though.

Anyways, you don't necessarily need to put so much weight on your pinky to anchor, do you? So long as it stays in place, it's fine. I've rarely had a guitar where my fingers slipped off the body, in any case.
I'm a communist. Really.
#26
THAT'S anochoring? I though it was when any part of your right arm touched the guitar. So if i rest my forearm on the guitar, that's not anchoring? and if sometimes my palm rests on the strings (which dosent cause noise) is that anchoring too?
#27
Well, in theory, if any part of your hand/arm is touching, that's anchoring. When I play, the only part of my hand/arm that touches is my palm on the lower strings. This is not anchoring however, as I keep a constant light pressure on the strings, instead of just dropping my hand there and leaving it. That's mainly just to keep string noise down.
My forearm will also touch sometimes, but I'm trying to stop that.
#28
i think people argue because no one has really gave a clear definition of what anchoring is.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#29
Quote by which ones pink
Well, in theory, if any part of your hand/arm is touching, that's anchoring. When I play, the only part of my hand/arm that touches is my palm on the lower strings. This is not anchoring however, as I keep a constant light pressure on the strings, instead of just dropping my hand there and leaving it. That's mainly just to keep string noise down.
My forearm will also touch sometimes, but I'm trying to stop that.

I have a question about this.

So right now I'm playing so that whenever I am not palm muting, my hand does not touch any part of the guitar - strings included - and it does touch the strings when palm muting.

Now I've heard that it is good to have the palm touching the lower strings when playing the higher ones to reduce string noise - what about when you are playing the lower strings. It seems that the left hand is used to mute the higher notes...but what if the riff skips in between the strings EAD? Will the left hand technique develop so that lifting fingers off the string makes no noise at all - or should the bottom strings be slightly muted at all time...and more heavily muted when palm muting?
Welcome to BUCKETHEADLAND

Last edited by Colonel Sanders : Yesterday at 10:54 PM.
#30
Quote by radiantmoon
i think people argue because no one has really gave a clear definition of what anchoring is.


Exactly, and thats still the case.
#32
would resting my hand on the low e string be anchoring cause that's what i do
#33
Quote by hcalifornia
would resting my hand on the low e string be anchoring cause that's what i do

I think anchoring is using your pinky and/or ring finger somewhere around the pick guard below the strings.

I think it's not compulsory, & that everyone should just do what's effective for them, but most importantly what's comfortable.
#34
I rest my forearm on the side of my guitar, the rest is "floating". I used to anchor my pinky on the pickup, but I got rid of the habit and I think I've improved from it. There's certainly a lot less tension in my playing. Especially sweep picking is much easier and more fluent when you don't anchor.