#1
is it normal, after a re-string, for a classical guitar to insanely go out of tune for days? I had it re-strung on monday, and it still goes flat. Like this morning i tuned it, and when i got home from school all the strings were a half-step flat.

Is this supposed to be happening??
Honestly. Wtf?


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#2
It works that way with any guitar, be it classical, acoustic, electric, or bass.

When you restring, it takes the strings a couple days to adjust to the tension. Metal/nylon streches, so when you first restring, the strings will strech until they adjust to the tension they're under. Just keep retuning for a couple days, and you'll notice after a while that they'll stay in tune.
#3
your strings need to stretch, I think classical guitars take nylon; I know nylon takes longer to stretch than the regular metal alloy strings. you can help the stretching by pulling the string(s) away from the neck of the guitar at around the 8th fret. Hold it for maybe 2 sec then set it down. Be careful though, let me tell you that when you break one by doing this you get extremely pissed
#4
i suppose your right, but i never had this much trouble after a restring on my electric XD. I figured it must be a little different for classical, this is the first time i had it re-strung.
Honestly. Wtf?


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#6
thanks guys.
Honestly. Wtf?


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#7
Quote by wyantsm
your strings need to stretch, I think classical guitars take nylon; I know nylon takes longer to stretch than the regular metal alloy strings. you can help the stretching by pulling the string(s) away from the neck of the guitar at around the 8th fret. Hold it for maybe 2 sec then set it down. Be careful though, let me tell you that when you break one by doing this you get extremely pissed

omg....snapping a brand new strings is one of the most frustrating things ever...


My mind is going. I can feel it.
#8
Also try starting above the soundhole, pinch a string between your thumb and first finger with your thumb in front and a slight gap between and flex the string by pressing your thumb down and pulling your finger up, as if playing a down and upstroke at the same time. Then move all the way down the neck repeating this every few inches.
#9
You know, I've changes some strings in my elec. guitar and it didn't get out of tune at all. I expected that it would happen the contrary but it worked fine ^^ I dunno, perhaps it also depends on the cualitiy of the fretboard, the strings...etc.
#10
It helps to pull on the strings a bit, to help them stretch. Pull on them hard enough not to break them of course. It will cause them to only stretch for a single day.
Michael Ferris
ferrisguitar.com
#11
yeah when you get new strings for a classical guitar you should tune it up, then stretch the strings a bit up and down and keep doing that for a bit and eventually it will get settled.
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#12
Sorry to bump an old thread,

But I recently dug out my old classical and had someone change the strings for me. Here's the newbie dilemma I had that I had when I first got the thing. I can't seem to tune up to the proper pitch without breaking the string. There is some give on the strings; I can pull them away from the fretboard, but if I try turning the pegs, there's a lot of resistance and I hear some creaking. I'm afraid to tune it up to the proper pitch because I feel like I'll eventually hear that dreaded "dt-dt-dt-dt-d... dt... .dt... SNAP!" as the nylon splits open and breaks the string. It's been a few days now and I've only been able to tune the B string properly. It has little resistance when I tune the peg.

Is this normal? I really can't seem to tune 5 of the strings to the proper pitch without getting so much resistance that I'm afraid I'm going to break the thing.

Thanks.
#13
That's very abnormal. Maybe there is something wrong with the tuning pegs/machine heads?

CT
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#14
Quote by cleanup
Sorry to bump an old thread,

But I recently dug out my old classical and had someone change the strings for me. Here's the newbie dilemma I had that I had when I first got the thing. I can't seem to tune up to the proper pitch without breaking the string. There is some give on the strings; I can pull them away from the fretboard, but if I try turning the pegs, there's a lot of resistance and I hear some creaking. I'm afraid to tune it up to the proper pitch because I feel like I'll eventually hear that dreaded "dt-dt-dt-dt-d... dt... .dt... SNAP!" as the nylon splits open and breaks the string. It's been a few days now and I've only been able to tune the B string properly. It has little resistance when I tune the peg.

Is this normal? I really can't seem to tune 5 of the strings to the proper pitch without getting so much resistance that I'm afraid I'm going to break the thing.

Thanks.

Sounds to me like the strings aren't wound correctly at the tuners, and they are slipping. Check out the site I've linked to for a tutorial on how to restring a classical.
As for the creaking, that could also be caused by the strings slipping on the tuners. Either way, have a look at the site and take it from there.

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/Classical/ClassicStr/classicstr1.html
#15
Quote by LeftyDave
Sounds to me like the strings aren't wound correctly at the tuners, and they are slipping. Check out the site I've linked to for a tutorial on how to restring a classical.
As for the creaking, that could also be caused by the strings slipping on the tuners. Either way, have a look at the site and take it from there.

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/Classical/ClassicStr/classicstr1.html


n00b question from me:

I re-strung a classical using that method, but I've always wondered why the string setup around the roller looks different to when I got the guitar brand new.

With this method it seems that the strings end up winding around the rollers maybe once or twice, whereas when I got the guitar brand new, the strings were wound around the rollers many many times.

Is there a significant difference in this setup?
Last edited by wallace g at Feb 12, 2009,
#16
The difference lies solely in who strung the guitar at the factory vs. you doing it yourself, and taking your time as you do it. Factory workers are undoubtedly under fire to get it done and ship it on to the next step in the build process, so they aren't quite as concerned with how it looks, but rather in getting it done so it can move on. Smaller shops will be more accurate. Another reason is excess string. By wrapping it up onto the tuners, they eliminate having to snip it off once the strings are on, and in a factory setting, that's just one less step they have to take.
The frets.com site I linked to is fab, and you won't go wrong by following his methods. The man is a master luthier with many years under his belt. I for one have yet to find a single thing that he says that I can dispute with any sort of confidence at all.
#17
yeah i only changed one string last time and it was out of tune for like 2 weeks
#18
Quote by Markkis
You know, I've changes some strings in my elec. guitar and it didn't get out of tune at all. I expected that it would happen the contrary but it worked fine ^^ I dunno, perhaps it also depends on the cualitiy of the fretboard, the strings...etc.


idiot r=this is a clasical not electric nylon is not even close to electic srings