#1
Is this the correct order going up the neck?
A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#

How would the notes differ down the neck?
Cause I was hearing if you go down the neck they turn into flats.

I'd appreciate any help, thanks
Last edited by burrrandon at Oct 11, 2007,
#2
yeah thats right, but going down you would use flats, G Gb, F, E, Eb ect.....and the one you posted (starting on A) is for the A string only (2nd thickest one)...the thick one (E string starts on E and goes up...E, F, F# ect)

EDIT:
A, Ab, G, Gb, F, E, Eb, D, Db, C, B, Bb
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Last edited by HellBent1337 at Oct 11, 2007,
#3
well the A#, C# etc can also be flats. A# is also Bb. im not sure if it makes a difference if your going up or down the neck, but im not the greatest with theory.

(note. Bb is B flat. the b stands for flat.)

edit: and its not going up or down the neck (unless your on the A string) thats the order of notes in an octave.
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#4
if you want to look into the theory, it doesnt matter if you go up or down (ascend or descend), it depends on the key you play in.

e.g. key of A major has A B C# D E F# G# A
but key of F major has F G A Bb C D E F

i think this is done so that - in the example of F - you wouldnt have A and then A#.

Look, that being said, and I'm pretty up on theory and work with music teachers, I still refer to Bb rather than A#, C# rather than Db, F# rather than Gb and Eb rather than D#. Because thats how I've seen them used most often.

And, if you want my opinion, dont bother getting too far into 'modes' and all that stuff, a note is a note whatever it is called. Look, Hendrix played his guitar tuned down a semitone so when he regarded he was playing an E it sounded like an Eb - he knew it was tuned down a semi-tone but would have been speaking to the others saying - play an E here, then a G and so on. (so when you try to work out his records its all a semitone lower than regular tuned guitar). So dont get all caught up in it all, just play and make it sound good.
#5
actually it does depend what way you are going asc or desc... anytime your lowring a note your flating it, any time your raising it your sharping it (it doesnt matter pitch wise, but the said note could be different)...but it really isnt a big deal at all, and i will always call my A# a Bb instead..
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#6
Quote by lsw444
if you want to look into the theory, it doesnt matter if you go up or down (ascend or descend), it depends on the key you play in.

e.g. key of A major has A B C# D E F# G# A
but key of F major has F G A Bb C D E F

i think this is done so that - in the example of F - you wouldnt have A and then A#.

Look, that being said, and I'm pretty up on theory and work with music teachers, I still refer to Bb rather than A#, C# rather than Db, F# rather than Gb and Eb rather than D#. Because thats how I've seen them used most often.


+1
Its based on the key your in, not if your ascending or descending in pitch. Also if your building chords, the root note effects if you will be using sharps or flats.
#7
SHARPS # (going up the neck) - e: E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#
FLATS b (going down the neck) - e:

SHARPS # (going up the neck) - B: B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G# A, A#
FLATS b (going down the neck) - B:

SHARPS # (going up the neck) - G: G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#
FLATS b (going down the neck) - G:

SHARPS # (going up the neck) - D: D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#
FLATS b (going down the neck) - D:

SHARPS # (going up the neck) - A: A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#
FLATS b (going down the neck) - A:

SHARPS # (going up the neck) - E: E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#
FLATS b (going down the neck) - E:

- - -

Okay here I wrote all the notes for each string, and was wondering if someone could right the flats going down the neck as if you were couting backwards from the 12th fret of each string.

Example:
FRET: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
SHARPS # (going up the neck) - E: E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#
FRET: 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
FLATS b (going down the neck) - E: Then whatever notes go here

- - -
(sorry there not alligned on the flats, sorta hard)
but hopefully you get what i am saying, and i would really appreciate if you guys took the time do it, im sure there is alot of people out there wondering this, once this gets written up, ill take the time to write it better and post a thread on it so other viewers can use it for reference, thank you!
#9
They don't turn into flats. Sharps and flats exists for diatonic purposes. A diatonic scale is when each of the notes is written atleast once. So, if a scale, say, F major is F G A A# C D E, it'll be written as F D A Bb C D E.
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#10
Memorise this word: Enharmonic.

An enharmonic note is a note that can be a sharp/flat. For example, an enharmonic note could be Gb (2nd fret on the low E string) which can ALSO be F#. Which one you use depends on the scale you're using and key you're in. Say, if you were in G major, that note would be an F# and NOT a Gb.

For further study, check out some of the lessons on the main site of UG, I think there's one with all then keys explained.
#11
They don't turn into flats. Sharps and flats exists for diatonic purposes. A diatonic scale is when each of the notes is written atleast once. So, if a scale, say, F major is F G A A# C D E, it'll be written as F D A Bb C D E.


how did you get Bb from a A# then i think i can have this down is it cause

A A#
B Bb

if that makes sense>? you just go a step up when changing # to b
#12
Quote by burrrandon
how did you get Bb from a A# then i think i can have this down is it cause

A A#
B Bb

if that makes sense>? you just go a step up when changing # to b


Think of the black notes on a piano.

Bb is at the exact same place as A# is on the piano. To get the enharmonic equivalent of a flattened note, you just go one step up.

C# -> Db
D# -> Eb,
F# -> Gb,
G# -> Ab,
A# -> Bb

See?
#13
well obviously in the alphabet the order is A, B right? well in music, between those two notes (the A and the B) is A# and Bb.
A# = Bb.
as explained earlier, which one you use depends on the scale you are using.

i.e. F = F G A Bb C D E
NOT
F = F G A A# C D E
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#14
E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#
E, F, Gb, G, Ab, A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Cb


Okay i read the 2 new responses and this is what i got from it, hopefully i got it right, but im pretty sure...this is right or at least close
Last edited by burrrandon at Oct 13, 2007,
#15
Quote by HellBent1337
actually it does depend what way you are going asc or desc... anytime your lowring a note your flating it, any time your raising it your sharping it (it doesnt matter pitch wise, but the said note could be different)...but it really isnt a big deal at all, and i will always call my A# a Bb instead..

No, it doesn't

whether they're sharps or flats depends solely on the key you're in, as far as ascending or descending goes the notes are exactly the same.
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#17
E, F, F#/Gb, G, G#/Ab, A, A#/Bb, B, C, C#/Db, D, D#/Eb

This is the best way to think of it, where there's two note names that just means it can be either. Remember the sharps or flats are solely dependent on the key you're in, it has absolutley nothing to do with ascending or descending.

The most widespread way of referring to the notes on the guitar is this though.

E, F, F#, G, Ab, A, Bb, B, C, C#, D, Eb, E.
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#18
THank you all of you guys! i get it now! really appreciate it, oh ya hahaha i just did a lil slip up at the end but i prolly just wasnt paying attention!

- - -

really appreciate it! thanks!
#19
it's like in english where you have There, Their, and They're

when said, they all sound the same, but are spelled differently.


same in music, enharmonic notes sound the same, but are spelled differently depending on context.


i'm sort of amazed how a lot of things in music can relate to language, maybe cause music is kind of like a language itself?
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#20
it's like in english where you have There, Their, and They're


ya that does make sense, and for sure music is its own language, i mean cmon it has to be? right? haha