#1
I have for the last year or so being learning scales. Pentatonic and Blues. Ino both of them in the key of A,D,E and G. But my biggest fear has just started to come true. Iam beggining to struggle to remmember the patterns of the scales. I know the notes that go into the scale, and that helps but i cant remmember where the shapes go. Iam hoping soon tht the more i play them i ll remmember them, but there are times i get writers block and cant think straight. To top it all off iam consideration in a years times to learn the majors and minors.

How am i going to remmeber all this?? Ino the relationships between the scales, but it is remmembering it.

Do I need to know that many scales???
#2
well if you can remember what all the notes on the fret board are at any given fret at any given time, as well as remembering the order of the notes are in a scale, eg C D E F G A B, then you should be able to work out the positions of the notes that are in the scale your playing, as you play it.
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#3
Like Dunjma said, except you could take it one step further and learn intervals, and if you're at one note and you want to go to the next (or any other, for that matter), you would know where to press. (Just think it might be easier to do more complex stuff, than just learning the notes)
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#4
uhm.. boxes work great, also play it over and over again :P you can use octaves like crazy, makes life a lot easier!

edit: depends on your musical style, and how much variation you want to put in, major and minor are a must (in my opinion) but they are basically the same, just with different chords, more exotic scales are also fun but not absolutely a must..
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Last edited by Esparcia at Oct 11, 2007,
#5
I'm not a fan of the boxes method. I know a couple friends including myself who use it and it always seems like we get caught up in a single box, which leads to really, really boring solos. Not saying it doesn't do its job, it just takes a little extra work to go farther. Your better off learning the interval formula for each scale.
#6
Quote by Windwaker
I'm not a fan of the boxes method. I know a couple friends including myself who use it and it always seems like we get caught up in a single box, which leads to really, really boring solos. Not saying it doesn't do its job, it just takes a little extra work to go farther. Your better off learning the interval formula for each scale.


For what it's worth, I second that. Boxes helped me at the start. But 2 years on, I'm wanting to break out of the boxes to do more interesting things, and I'm having difficulty doing it.
Learning the boxes can lead to you overlooking the fact that you need to learn the notes on the fretboard. After 2 years I've been able to pick up an average grasp of what notes are where. But looking back, I think I'd know them all so much better if I'd focused on the intervals instead of the box shapes.
#7
I have all the shapes memorized, however I find that I have to improvise with a scale for a while to really learn it. There is nothing wrong with playing in only one box. If that's all you can do, then you have a problem. However, it is fun to solo around in one box for a while. You don't always have to jump around the neck
#8
As soon i got to grips playing the guitar for the first few months, i made sure that i had learnt most of the notes on the fret board. So i was sure that it was going to be very handy to know. When i came to playing scales and learning the shapes i knew what notes i was playing!!