#1
I hate my fingers, when doing chords. One thing has to find the right string then the others will follow. I carnt seem to train my fingers so that all fingers hit the strings at the same time. ahhhhh
#2
lol just practice the chords overrr n overrr that happened to me wen i played the g chord wen playing songs id put the bass strings down before the higher ones
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#3
I still, to this day, hit the strings at different times... Albeit very very quickly after each other(as in I NEVER mess up rhythm with a bum chord), but they still won't go down as a group.
#4
Hmmm...this is interesting. I never paid much attention before to this but I think you guys tripped on something. I do the same thing and it started me thinking . I wonder if it is because we learned to place the fingers one at a time and therefore, the muscle memory takes over and you do as you taught your muscles?

Definately interesting

Chris
#5
This is an interesting subject, because certain chords I had a tendency to anchor with my pinky and I wouldn't have the chord formed in time, so I know what you mean.

When you think of forming a chord, I don't think you should necessarily think of having all your fingers form in the right spot at the same time. As you play guitar and songs that you are comfortable with, you'll probably get used to having your fingers adjust in the split seconds between chords and what not. My fingers STILL form in their own way though, probably just faster than they use to. For example on a G chord, my third finger is still the first to land on the guitar at the E string, so it all depends on your comfortableness with those chords!

Just practice your chords. One good thing to do is to practice your songs in halftime to get the chords and that chord movement/muscle memorization going. However slow and steady wins the race. Just be patient and enjoy playing! thats my motto.
#6
I've played for a long time and I still don't manage to hit the frets at exactly the same time. You never will - what you should be focusing on is making it sound reasonably good even if you don't. Practice fingering the chord over and over - lift your hand off the fretboard, stretch it out, then slowly move the fingers in position smoothly. Repeat and slooowly raise the speed at which you put your fingers in place. It's all about learning your fingers to act on their own, without relying on your brain giving them specific orders - because that way, your brain can only tell one finger at the time.
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#7
^Yeah, I experience the same thing. I basically try to 'land' my fingers just before each string is strummed. So like with a G on a downstrum, I focus on getting my index and middle down first, then my ring. That way, the notes still ring out even though my ring finger's a little "slower on the draw", so to speak.
#8
few, i thought it was just me. I can change chords but its just the frations of a second that is making my chord playing sound average. I think i just need to speed up then thats it.
#9
Quote by Garou1911
^Yeah, I experience the same thing. I basically try to 'land' my fingers just before each string is strummed. So like with a G on a downstrum, I focus on getting my index and middle down first, then my ring. That way, the notes still ring out even though my ring finger's a little "slower on the draw", so to speak.

Uh oh, what if you upstrum!?
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