#1
A few days ago I decided to work on my speed and scales. Basically, whenever I can play a scale with ease I bump my metronome up a little bit. I'm a cheap bastard so I use the guitar pro 4 metronome.

My question is whats a decent speed to aim for before moving on to a different scale to learn and get faster with?
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#2
Go at your own pace. Dont try to rush into 3847346 bpm speeds.

It takes time, kinda the same concept as learning a song. Learn it slow first, if you try to play full speed at first, you'll **** up every time until you practice.
#3
TJM's nailed it on the head there.

AND metronomeonline.com is a free metronome too.
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#4
I know, I am in no hurry. Whenever I can play a certain speed with ease I only increase with like 2 on the GP4 metronome.

There has to be sort of a goal for me though in order to keep motivated. If I don't have a certain speed to aim for, I'll have trouble keeping my practicing up.

so what speed would be good enough to warrant moving on to a new scale? I will be practicing a lot, progressing slowly toward this goal..
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#6
Also, for everything you learn and practice think "How useful is this actually going to be in my playing". With that in mind, the ability to run up and down scales at high speed is pretty useless. If you want to learn a scale then you should learn it all over the fretboard so you can use it properly, otherwise you'll spend half your playing life stuck in boxes and the other half trying to get out of them.

Scales aren't there to be used as speed tests, they're musical tools to help you understand, play and ultimately compose music. If you're just learning them as picking patterns then you're not really doing anything other than cluttering your head up with knowledge that you can't use properly.

Speed is the WORST source of motivation you can have in guitar, remember you want to learn to play the thing, there's no "Guitar Olympics"...

..at least, not yet
Actually called Mark!

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#7
well...then what should I be doing to improve my speed? I always thought scales were the way to go.

Also, I'm not trying to improve my speed just for the sake of going "omgzors I can do 1000 bpm!!!!" At this time I just don't have the fingering speed required to play a lot of songs I like by bands such as Children of Bodom or certain solos. I am trying to improve my speed so I can play these faster songs and solos, and play my current repertoire with greater accuracy and precision.
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Last edited by Mark G at Oct 11, 2007,
#8
hmmm. for my speed i made up a 5 note like and metronomed it too my hearts content!

seemed to help my overall playing too.

expecially picking accuracy.
#9
Quote by Mark G
well...then what should I be doing to improve my speed? I always thought scales were the way to go.

Not really, because all you learn is how to play scales fast, you train your fingers to follow those patterns and ultimately they aren't particularly useful or interesting to play. The best way to approach scales is to look at them across the whole fretboard and work out patterns that ascend horizontally as well as vertically. That gets you moving over the whole fretboard which is a valuable skil.

Use the notes of the scale, but use them in an interesting way...arrange patterns that involve string skipping, hammer-ons, legato runs etc. basically, work the scale in a way that's actually going to benefit your playing.

If you concentrate on playing accurately then you naturally become faster, it's a gradual progression but it does happen. Just don't expect a jump in speed over a couple of weeks, it takes time.
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#10
>-< I don't like your answer. Anyway, if the truth hurts so be it. I guess I'll just focus on accuracy. I don't want to waste time on things that aren't going to help me.
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#12
scales will be helpful on occasion, a short run thrown in can be effective, but you want to build speed of playing in general. practice solos by other bands (slow them down then build speed) arpeggios chord changes.

alsoif doing scales try skipping strings, also try ascending and descending with your fingers going in the opposite direction, alternative fingering combos (e.g. 1 3 2 4 instead of 1 2 3 4 all the time) everything you know about guitar, relearn it all as a speed building process
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#13
Quote by steven seagull
Also, for everything you learn and practice think "How useful is this actually going to be in my playing". With that in mind, the ability to run up and down scales at high speed is pretty useless. If you want to learn a scale then you should learn it all over the fretboard so you can use it properly, otherwise you'll spend half your playing life stuck in boxes and the other half trying to get out of them.

Scales aren't there to be used as speed tests, they're musical tools to help you understand, play and ultimately compose music. If you're just learning them as picking patterns then you're not really doing anything other than cluttering your head up with knowledge that you can't use properly.

Speed is the WORST source of motivation you can have in guitar, remember you want to learn to play the thing, there's no "Guitar Olympics"...

..at least, not yet

^Truth.

I mean there's nothing wrong with wanting to play fast, but you really need to go elsewhere with scales to get the full use out of them. The main way to really learn scales is to first learn the 5 positions, how they connect, and where to put it in certain keys.

Put on Freebird, get into some E Minor Pentatonic, and that's how you really get comfortable with scales. 348738 BPM means nothing if you dont have melody and sense of rhythm and what you're playing over.
#14
one thing i learned from dave martone (and this can only work well in 3 note-per-string patterns)
don't play your scales like the following (the numbers are scale degrees, think standard major scale):

d -------------4-5-7----
a -------3-5-7----------
e -3-5-7----------------


instead, come up with patterns.

d -------------7-4-5----
a -------7-3-5----------
e -7-3-5----------------


in that example, i'd use the first note (7th fret) played on each string set and tap it, it's an awesome way to fly up a scale quickly.

you don't have to limit yourself to 3 notes either:

d -------------------------7-4-5-7-5-4-
a -------------7-3-5-7-5-3-------------
e -7-3-5-7-5-3-------------------------


don't limit yourself to the boring. make anything you ever do sound fun and be interesting to play!
gear?
coming soon... parker fly mojo flame
ibanezes: rg350dx frankenstein * rg7620 7-string
fenders: telecaster plus * stratocaster plus

line 6: pod xt live * ax2 212
other: laney vh100r * mesa dual rectifier * monster cables
#15
learn each fingering for each scale. then you will be able to move it around and play a solo in any key.

imo thats alot more important than running a scale up and down really fast.

((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((()
#16
Quote by steven seagull
would it help if it came from somebody else?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPvvTJ0ySPw


Theres no arguing with Steve Vai is there:p

one thing i learned from dave martone (and this can only work well in 3 note-per-string patterns)
don't play your scales like the following (the numbers are scale degrees, think standard major scale):
Code:

d -------------4-5-7---- a -------3-5-7---------- e -3-5-7----------------


instead, come up with patterns.
Code:

d -------------7-4-5---- a -------7-3-5---------- e -7-3-5----------------


in that example, i'd use the first note (7th fret) played on each string set and tap it, it's an awesome way to fly up a scale quickly.

you don't have to limit yourself to 3 notes either:
Code:

d -------------------------7-4-5-7-5-4- a -------------7-3-5-7-5-3------------- e -7-3-5-7-5-3-------------------------


don't limit yourself to the boring. make anything you ever do sound fun and be interesting to play!


Thats pretty cool, I'll try mixing things up a bit more:p

*edit* Oh damn that quote came out wrong
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