#1
hey guys, i'm considering getting a Samick OM-7, with solid cedar top and rosewood back and sides. any opinions on this?

my other option is a walden g570, with mahogany instead of rosewood.

any comments on how different the sound would be between the two? how different build quality would be?

i don't know anywhere near me that sells either samicks or waldens, so i can't really go try anything out.
Quote by SeveralSpecies
Btw, I don't spell it doughnut, because that spells duff-nut.
#2
only thing i can say is you should be playing the guitars before buying them dont just order one even with feedback from people on the site here you are better off playing one somewhere or playing all your considerations before deciding so you know the feel and tone you get from each

!!! i seem to be having trouble with reading everything through today sorry man.... didnt see that you couldnt find anywhere to try anything out id still settle for less knowing your getting a guitar you like the tone and feel of though
Last edited by Zeppelin Addict at Oct 11, 2007,
#3
yeah, i really wish i could try them out, but i can't find anything.

any other opinions?
Quote by SeveralSpecies
Btw, I don't spell it doughnut, because that spells duff-nut.
#4
Walden has gotten some good reviews, not sure about that specific model though. I personally like the sound of Mahogany better than Rosewood but .. are the back and sides solid? If they're laminates it probably won't make a huge difference. Usually mahogany will be brighter and rosewood more bass-y. I'm guessing the Samick would be a very bassy sounding guitar, since cedar is usually a bit darker than spruce. The Walden would probably be more balanced. This is very, very hard to determine without playing though. Actually, a lot of people wouldn't even really notice when playing unless you have played guitar for awhile.

For the record, I have a cedar topped instrument and LOVE the sound of it. Are there any guitar shops nearby that might have acoustics with comparable attributes? They might not have the Samick or Walden, but maybe they have Alvarez or something? Try to find two models in a similar price range with woods matching the one's you're looking at. Might give you an idea. Granted, many other things factor in but ... hey, it can't hurt.

Good luck!
#5
I would try before you buy, Cedar has a much mellower tone than Spruce which you might not like. Cedar is pretty common with classical guitars but you don't see many steel strings using it for soundboards, probably because it lacks the attack that you want from a steel string? Anyone else got any thoughts on this?
#6
go for the Walden. Their build quality, tone, and playability are unmatched in that price range.
"There but for fortune go you or I"- Phil Ochs
#7
Quote by guitarnoize
I would try before you buy, Cedar has a much mellower tone than Spruce which you might not like. Cedar is pretty common with classical guitars but you don't see many steel strings using it for soundboards, probably because it lacks the attack that you want from a steel string? Anyone else got any thoughts on this?

Mellower? At least to me, cedar generally has a brighter tone specifically with the treble than spruce. There are plenty of steel strings with cedar tops, but obviously spruce is much more common.

Like you said cedar has long been used as a soundboard material by classical guitar makers for its vibrance and clarity of sound. It is extremely light in weight compared to spruce, and the tonal result is generally a slightly louder, more open response. Cedar generally sound balanced, warm and rich with bright trebles. What is most characteristic of cedar is that it sounds broken-in, even when new.

Spruce is chosen because of its consistent quality as well as its straight uniform grain, longevity, and tensile strength. Tonally, Sitka spruce is extremely vibrant providing an ideal "diaphragm" for transmission of sound on any size and style of stringed instrument.

@aequitasveritas: It really depends on what kind of sound you are looking for. If you don't know the difference, I'd suggest you try out guitars at your local shop. In general, rosewood is resonant, producing a deep warm projective bass response. On the other hand, mahogany yields a strong loud sound with a quick response and an emphasis on warm, round midrange.
#8
I stand corrected, sorry I've always thought that Cedar had a much warmer sound than Spruce? In fact my classical guitar is European Spruce but that may be for the consistency like you mentioned. Anyway thanks for the info, you sound like you know your woods!
#9
Cedar can be warmer than spruce, my G570 is warmer sounding than my spruce topped D550; but it all depends on the guitar, the bracing, etc.
"There but for fortune go you or I"- Phil Ochs