#1
I found a thing on another website the other day that listed the names of the notes on each fret (assuming standard tuning) and decided to check it with my tuner. When I did I noticed that most of the notes are slightly sharp. I've read on a number of sites that the 12th fret (mine is right on at the 12th fret) is the one to check but I that doesnt really make sense. So, is it normal for most of the frets 1-11 to be a little sharp?

Also, I messed with my setup a little bit and got it closer but its still not perfect like the diagram shows.
#2
also, do you have jumbo frets? light strings?
Jenneh

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#3
Perfect intonation is when the open fret, 12th, and natural harmonic on the 12th are all the exact same note (different pitch). According to a Fender strat group im in on myspace, you can line up the intonation correctly, its impossible to have an istrument in perfect tuning on every fret.
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#4
^well the reason i asked him about frets and string gauge is because, sometimes mashing while fretting a jumbo or while using light strings, causes you to go sharp.

and yeah you can get pretty close along the board. just depends on the guitar.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#5
You'll never get it 100% right. If it sounds downright bad, keep trying to adjust the intonation, the truss rod, the action etc, or take it to a luthier and see what a professional makes out of it. It's not possible to get the notes 100% right, though - for that, they'd have to stop making frets that are straight, for starters. Steve Vai had a JEM guitar with frets that were bent to intonate correctly, but that probably requires the guitar to be hand-made as well as the frets... Lots of trouble. Don't worry about it unless you can really hear it when playing.
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#6
Quote by Raziel2p
You'll never get it 100% right. If it sounds downright bad, keep trying to adjust the intonation, the truss rod, the action etc, or take it to a luthier and see what a professional makes out of it. It's not possible to get the notes 100% right, though - for that, they'd have to stop making frets that are straight, for starters. Steve Vai had a JEM guitar with frets that were bent to intonate correctly, but that probably requires the guitar to be hand-made as well as the frets... Lots of trouble. Don't worry about it unless you can really hear it when playing.


I saw that guitar, the frets looked wierd, and like they would be hard to bend on.
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