#1
I've been using Guitar Pro for ages now and found it to be very useful. What I wanted to know is does anyone know how I can take mp3's or CD's and turn them in to Guitar Pro Tabs?
Any advice would be welcome
Thanks
#2
no.
gear?
coming soon... parker fly mojo flame
ibanezes: rg350dx frankenstein * rg7620 7-string
fenders: telecaster plus * stratocaster plus

line 6: pod xt live * ax2 212
other: laney vh100r * mesa dual rectifier * monster cables
#3
you know... you can't make a guitar pro from a mp3, audio or whatever
you have to get the songs by ear =P no other way!
the guitar pro is the best thing ever created! XD
hail guitar pro!
#5
i think that's been answered. but i'll explain since i don't think you got it. it all goes into audio algorithms. an mp3 is just a series of wavelengths - there is no way for a program to interpret what's guitar, bass, drums, banjo, mongolian juice harp, drums, triangle, etc. because a guitar is a tool for playing chords to one person and a tool for making the oddest sounds with as many fx as possible to another. what if it's tuned down, ran through an orange amp, and has a delay pedal on 98% feedback? or a baritone, ran through a tech 21, with a whammy pedal up an octave (or two, or six)? there's no way for software to understand and decipher what each instrument is.

MIDI, on the other hand, stores exactly what notes are being played, with duration, time, dynamics, etc., and tells your computer to use "guitar sound n, with fx x, y, and z." of course it doesn't sound like a real guitarist, it's meant to get close. plus, you can't computerize emotion in playing, or millisecond delays or etc. since MIDI files hold all the information related to what's being played, those can be converted into Guitar Pro files. just check out the options in the open dialog and in the import menu of GP for other similar formats that can be imported.

'nuff said.

/thread.
gear?
coming soon... parker fly mojo flame
ibanezes: rg350dx frankenstein * rg7620 7-string
fenders: telecaster plus * stratocaster plus

line 6: pod xt live * ax2 212
other: laney vh100r * mesa dual rectifier * monster cables
#6
Quote by DougC84
i think that's been answered. but i'll explain since i don't think you got it. it all goes into audio algorithms. an mp3 is just a series of wavelengths - there is no way for a program to interpret what's guitar, bass, drums, banjo, mongolian juice harp, drums, triangle, etc. because a guitar is a tool for playing chords to one person and a tool for making the oddest sounds with as many fx as possible to another. what if it's tuned down, ran through an orange amp, and has a delay pedal on 98% feedback? or a baritone, ran through a tech 21, with a whammy pedal up an octave (or two, or six)? there's no way for software to understand and decipher what each instrument is.

MIDI, on the other hand, stores exactly what notes are being played, with duration, time, dynamics, etc., and tells your computer to use "guitar sound n, with fx x, y, and z." of course it doesn't sound like a real guitarist, it's meant to get close. plus, you can't computerize emotion in playing, or millisecond delays or etc. since MIDI files hold all the information related to what's being played, those can be converted into Guitar Pro files. just check out the options in the open dialog and in the import menu of GP for other similar formats that can be imported.

'nuff said.

/thread.


That's pretty much it, and it also takes a ****load of time to get to know the rhythms of notes and how drums work etc. That being said, I think it's honestly one of the best programs ever created. It's so easy to use to write your own music once you know how to use it.