#1
Hi guys, I was just playing around with my guitar, and I just realised something... fredolutionarararary!

Each time I was picking a note, it gave me a different noise, it seems to vary from fret to fret (see attatched), but they all have at least 17 different notes (most common result was 14), each of theme eggs-creamly (extremely for you who don't partake in the patois of the Imperial City of Great London Town Centre) different, resulting in extra tones.

Or, in diagram;
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7

(For comparison, concert pitch A exists roughly halfway between the middle two ie 7.5 looking at the average; on the scale black - uninumerable, blue - average, red innumerable)

Anyways, this got me thinking.

Surely I've realised a new potential here. Instead of using octaves of 12, I can use octaves of 168 (12 * average notes per fret)

Think of all the riffs!

Thanks for listening guys, sorry it got a bit scientific.

Maybe you could tell me if you've noticed this, or if you'd like to say what you think.

Cheers, BrianApocalypse
Last edited by BrianApocalypse at Oct 13, 2007,
#2
soooo, you found in between notes? or you found out what overtones are? seriously, what?
#3
I was just messin around on mine and i found the 4th possible octave with a 22 fret guitar

octave 1: open string
octave 2: 12th fret fingered/harmonic
octave 3: 5th fret harmonic, directly over front pickup harmonic
OCTACE 4: 17th fret harmonic (barely audible, but its there)

well, thats my rambling about useless nothingness for now
#4
Quote by icon_player_5
I was just messin around on mine and i found the 4th possible octave with a 22 fret guitar

octave 1: open string
octave 2: 12th fret fingered/harmonic
octave 3: 5th fret harmonic, directly over front pickup harmonic
OCTACE 4: 17th fret harmonic (barely audible, but its there)

well, thats my rambling about useless nothingness for now


oh, harmonics, yeah those dont create new notes, but they do have a different tonality
#6
It probably not as big a deal as I thought it was, you'll have to excuse my behaviour at the time as I was off my tits.

But I realised that every time you fret a note, it's never the same note at all, and nobody has ever played the same note on a guitar as anyone else, it's always slightly out.

So, in theory, you could have scales with intervals of less than a cent, less than a Hz - it's just that people would not be able to get their heads around them.
#7
you could always defret your guitar and have every single cent of each note then available to you that way.
#9
Quote by Kivarenn82
you could always defret your guitar and have every single cent of each note then available to you that way.


you could do the same thing with a slide i suppose, if I am understanding the TS properly....
#11
I don't get it



Quote by KileManA7X
I remember my first erection. I went to my dad and was like "Do I have Aids???". I seriously thought there was something wrong with me.



#13
He means the pitch shifting that occurs when too much pressure is applied when fretting a note.

Which is the EXACT same thing as a small bend.
"A guitar is just like a hard teddy, isn't it?" - DAAAAAAAN BAKER