#1
I was looking into squire basses a few weeks ago, but then decided to look into Fender Jazz and P basses a few days ago. the reason why I was really interested in the Squire special P bass was because of the Jazz humbucker in the bridge and the P bass splitcoi in the neck.

I want to learn to play bass is cause I'm limited in what I can play on guitar. I'm into so many styles of music, but I can only really play chords, so I'm really just stuck playing metal. I just go out and get the bass that most of bassist I want emulate use because its pretty much 50/50 between jazz and p bass players......The Squire p bass special would have been great, but I heard that the sound was weak side.


What really separates these two basses?

http://www.guitar.co.uk/guitars/bass/237-fender_standard_jazz_bass_rosewood

http://www.guitar.co.uk/guitars/bass/233-fender_standard_precision_bass_rosewood


I know that the Jazz has two humbuckers, does the P bass pickup work in a similar way to a spitcoil humbucker? I'm guessing that its a 3 way selector switch, so wouldn't that be like having a guitar with a H/S/S setup? If I was going on versatility would that would give you more tones than having 2 humbuckers?
#2
You're actually very far off in almost everything you said in that last paragraph. The jazz has two single coil pickups, not humbuckers. The p-bass has a split single coil which acts similar hum-cancelling-wise as a humbucker. There is no three way selector switch on either of those basses. In the case of the jazz it's controlled by two master volumes, one for the neck pickup and one for the bridge pickup. It also has a passive tone control which cuts treble frequencys. The p-bass has only one pickup and therefore has one master volume and one passive tone control. It's nothing like having a guitar with a H/S/S setup, I can't even imagine where you got that impression. Again, the jazz doesn't have humbuckers, but single coils. And, the single coils are the most versatile pickup configuration out there. (Other than the J/P/J on the Hamm Sig possibly).
#3
I thought that Jazz basses had humbuckers and that they hadn't listed anything about the pickup selector. I don't know where I got the idea of the split pickup set up..... just seamed logical in my mind

Like I said before I don't really have much of a clue about bass. I've been playing bass lines on my Strat coppy so as far as far as basses go I'm looking for something strat like to make the transition from guitar to bass easier + I'm looking for something with a more mellow sound. If I wasn't I would probably have been looking into an Ibanez with actives.
#4
Sorry if I sounded like a jerk, I just wanted to tell you where you went wrong. If we didn't make mistakes how would we learn?
If you want mellow I will always say passive jazz. So that Jazz you have in that link would be perfect.
#5
If you want it to feel similar to a strat, P basses have the same neck width as them I believe. However, I'm a Jazz man myself. If you went for the VM series you would be in better shape.
#6
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Sorry if I sounded like a jerk, I just wanted to tell you where you went wrong. If we didn't make mistakes how would we learn?
If you want mellow I will always say passive jazz. So that Jazz you have in that link would be perfect.



I didn't think you sounded like a jerk I'd prefer people to pull me up on my mistakes than letting me run with them and make an ass of myself in the long run lol


I do like metal, but as I can only really play metal guitar I'm after a bass for lighter rock and stuff with a funky vibe like RHCP at the min. I'm only really looking at passive basses. I'm going to see how I get on with a passive 4 sring then I'll probably move on to an Ibanez SR505 or something.
#8
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Yeah, if you want lighter rock and funk stuff then I would say there's nothing better than a good ol' passive J.



I knew there was a reason why I was looking into it lol. I don't suppose you'd know how that would sound hooked up to an Ashdown ABM C115-500 EVO II Combo would you?
#9
Fantastic. That's a very nice amp. I'm not an Ashdown know-it-all but they have a sound kind of like a throaty voiced porn star. Very nice and smooth with a touch of dirty. That's just from what I've heard of them. As a rule basses rely far more on the amp than anything else so for the overall sound look at what sound the amp is making. For feel and versatility look at the bass.
#10
So you're playing bass because guitar is "too hard?"


*Sigh*


Anyways, jazz_rock_feel has pretty much taken care of you.
#11
Quote by Charlatan_001
So you're playing bass because guitar is "too hard?"


*Sigh*

Anyways, jazz_rock_feel has pretty much taken care of you.



I have a condition that effects my coordination and dexterity, I can form chord shapes its just that I can't get my fingers to move to another position as fast as I would like...... so I'm stuck playing power chords and simple riffs. When I was the moody teen that was great fun, but I've grown up a bit over the last few months and want to explore new musical horizons.

I'm not being a dick, I'm just giving you an explanation.
#12
if you want a real nice setup, go for a fender j-bass standard with a 2x10 ashdown
i fell in love with this set up at the Musicians Friend WAREHOUSE thats 10 minutes away from me, the one i tried was fretless and a blem, but the tone was so good, i didnt even notice it was fretless until i actually looked for them
#13
Quote by jthm72
if you want a real nice setup, go for a fender j-bass standard with a 2x10 ashdown
i fell in love with this set up at the Musicians Friend WAREHOUSE thats 10 minutes away from me, the one i tried was fretless and a blem, but the tone was so good, i didnt even notice it was fretless until i actually looked for them



Sounds cool, but I think I've found my set up + I don't have a lot of room....... I'm still p***ed off about having to get rid of my H&k warp 7 212. I'd do just about anything to get the 112 but they don't make them anymore and I've not been able to find one on ebay