#1
Hello all

I have 2 guitars: a classical and an electric. Both are cheap, entry-level guitars. They don't suck. I quite like them. But I am considering a new one.

The thing is, I always feel that whatever I buy, even if it's the perfect guitar, I will regret it. A few months ago, I bought a Schecter C-1 classic. It was an amazing guitar, but I was somehow haunted by this feeling of regret. I can't explain it. I almost felt guilty of some crime. I HAD to get rid of it.

Perhaps cos that guitar was too over-the-top for me (neck thru, quilt top, gold hardware, abalone inlays...), but I think it'll happen with whatever guitar I buy.

I don't want to have a ton of guitars. I want one that's good for everything.

Now, I'm considering building my own guitar, cos I can make one to my exact specs, but I think I'll regret that too, and I'll be tortured by it.

Is this some sort of disorder? The feeling seems to be unnaturally strong...

Help?
#2
Youre attached to your old guitars, simple as that.
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#3
If you make your own guitar, your gunna spend a lot more time (and probably more money) on it. If you regret that guitar, it's going to be a lot worse


Try out more guitars, eventually you will get over your regret, and once you buy that guitar thats just right, even if you regret it for a while, you'll eventually love it as your own.
#4
no, it's normal, but at the end of the day if you do get a guitar, consider yourself lucky, and treat it like a lady for the rest of its years, avoid regret or you're not a man.
DANK MEMES
#5
I believe you have a bad case of GAS.


Gear Acquisition Syndrome that is.
ಥ_ಥ
#6
It's perfectly normal
For me i get like guilt trips before i buy about it being a waste of money or something and after i get the thing i'll usually feel crap for a couple of days until i realise its fine and love the new thing i bought

It's happened with guitar and amps repeatedly and also especially effects
#7
Never had the feeling about a guitar cause I went from a guitar that was godawful to a guitar that I can't stand the look of anymore, to finally one I love.

But I did experience that type of feeling when I had to turn in my old jeans and hoodie. I didn't like the new ones as much at first but now They're the staple of my clothing.
#8
How do I overcome regret, then?

I've tried a ton of guitars, mostly Fenders, Ibanez, Jacksons, Schecters, one Gibson and a Squier or two, and even though my favourite artists use them, I couldn't get the sound I want.

I don't think there is one that's "just right". Since I only want 1 guitar, it has to be perfect in every way, and not one of them is.

Quote by arsonite
I believe you have a bad case of GAS.

Gear Acquisition Syndrome that is.


GAS is when you can't stop buying guitars. That's, like, the opposite of what I have
Last edited by sashki at Oct 13, 2007,
#10
Quote by Fusanti_RHCP
Get a PARKER!!!!!!!!!!!
they do EVERYTHING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I tried a parker...their necks are too thin. Also, I can't afford them, and I don't like the look.
#11
i understand(even though everyone else said they did) its not a disorder but you may be a little unstable just as i am. you're not crazy, theres nothing genuinely wrong its just you feel like you're not good enough for the guitar, am I right? i suggest keeping the ones you have and instead of buying new ones, upgrade those. maybe take up a sport (maybe football) to not only take your mind off it, but you could get rid of some of your anger/anxiety in the form of wasting energy.
#12
its a simple pattern...

GAS...ecstacy....buyer's regret....???...profit.........then complacency
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#13
If you want the one guitar that is perfect for you, you'll probably have to build it yourself or have it custom made. But to me, it sounds like you don't like flashy guitars (like Schecters)? If that's the case you could make a very plain looking guitar.
#14
Quote by whatadrag
i understand(even though everyone else said they did) its not a disorder but you may be a little unstable just as i am. you're not crazy, theres nothing genuinely wrong its just you feel like you're not good enough for the guitar, am I right? i suggest keeping the ones you have and instead of buying new ones, upgrade those. maybe take up a sport (maybe football) to not only take your mind off it, but you could get rid of some of your anger/anxiety in the form of wasting energy.

I'm happy playing my current axe, and I'm not bothered since I sold the C-1.

The thing is, I at the same time WANT and am AFRAID TO BUY a new guitar.

I'm perfectly fine with my old one, but some day I will need a new one for whatever reason, and then I'll be ****ting myself over it...

Quote by Kanthras
If you want the one guitar that is perfect for you, you'll probably have to build it yourself or have it custom made. But to me, it sounds like you don't like flashy guitars (like Schecters)? If that's the case you could make a very plain looking guitar.


Exactly. I like bold colours, but I focus more on practicality than flash. I like the look of Fenders, but I can't get the sound out of them that I want...
#15
your cheating on your two guitars but playing the new one and i know what you mean but i overcame it beucase if you think about it you need a better guitar if you are palying more complex stuff that needs a good souding axe
#16
btw what sound did you want out of your guitar? also one more: how old are you in other words-do you go to school?
#17
you guys are all weird! :P i never have any regret for buying something, well mebe like a second of...well damn, i could have bought X amount of weed for the same money... but then the moment passes.

i think u just need to find the right guitar, then be a man and destroy your old ones so u can never look back.
#18
There are two solutions to be attached to an old guitar:
(a) Keep using it for some specialized purpose. I, for instance, keep an old guitar for playing in open D.
(b) Give it away or sell it to someone who will use it. That way, it's not just sitting around collecting dust.
Death to Ovation haters!
#19
I'm 16, in high school (so I guess worrying is natural)

And I'm aiming for a huge, roaring overdrive, the kind that Dan Hawkins, Malcolm Young and Phil Campbell get as a rhythm sound.

Quote by PatchworkMan
There are two solutions to be attached to an old guitar:
(a) Keep using it for some specialized purpose. I, for instance, keep an old guitar for playing in open D.
(b) Give it away or sell it to someone who will use it. That way, it's not just sitting around collecting dust.


Why? I still play both
#20
I know what you're talking about. Just keep trying different guitars out and you'll find something you like. I have a bunch of guitars and I refuse to part with my first acoustic and first electric. It's strange moving on from them but it's inevitable, play more and let it happen as it happens. I would recommend getting something over your head, it'll mean that you'll have years of playing enjoyment with the instrument. You'll know a quality instrument when you play one, even if you don't think you're "good enough" for it and trust me...being "good enough" is all relative. Find what feels right, what will last and make the temporary guilt, temporary. I would recommend playing some custom shop guitars...it sounds crazy I know (and not cheap) but you'll find a level of character in the instrument that you'll appreciate, regardless of your playing level. It's the appreciation of what's in your hands that makes a big difference so give it a shot. Find a good custom instrument and you'll find that as opposed to paying for a name and artist endorsements, you pay for quality all around.
#21
Quote by sashki
I'm 16, in high school (so I guess worrying is natural)

And I'm aiming for a huge, roaring overdrive, the kind that Dan Hawkins, Malcolm Young and Phil Campbell get as a rhythm sound.


Why? I still play both



Get a Fender with a humbucker or two then, since you like the look, and humbuckers will give you the sound you want


also, if you like the look of a guitar, but can't get that desired sound, don't give up, try it on every goddamn amp in the store!
#22
Quote by sashki
I'm 16, in high school (so I guess worrying is natural)

And I'm aiming for a huge, roaring overdrive, the kind that Dan Hawkins, Malcolm Young and Phil Campbell get as a rhythm sound.


Why? I still play both



if u want that kinda tone get a new amp, not guitar.
#23
Quote by stringmagician

also, if you like the look of a guitar, but can't get that desired sound, don't give up, try it on every goddamn amp in the store!



stringmagician is right...the amp is very important. Each amp has it's own sound, they need to. Me, I can't stand Fender guitars...it's just me, they don't do what I need them to do...but...plug them into a good amp that does the work it's supposed to and to be honest...they don't perform so bad at all.

Funny...now that I think about it, a decent H/H Fender and a couple Bartolini pickups....hmm...I may have a project.
#25
My first electric was an Ibanez RG320...still have it. Try the ESP/LTD series if you haven't already. If you like lots of overdrive I would recommend looking at EMG pickups and trying guitars with those but be warned...EMG pikcups have a distinctive purpose and their active pickups, although awesome...sound the same from one guitar to the next. Passive pickups like Duncans, tend to accent features of the guitar like tone woods, scale length and whatnot. When looking for amps, I would recommend looking for an amp that will do the work...find something where you wont be relying on fuzz boxes for distortion and stuff like that. Let the amp do the work.
#26
Quote by celticstorm84
My first electric was an Ibanez RG320...still have it. Try the ESP/LTD series if you haven't already. If you like lots of overdrive I would recommend looking at EMG pickups and trying guitars with those but be warned...EMG pikcups have a distinctive purpose and their active pickups, although awesome...sound the same from one guitar to the next. Passive pickups like Duncans, tend to accent features of the guitar like tone woods, scale length and whatnot. When looking for amps, I would recommend looking for an amp that will do the work...find something where you wont be relying on fuzz boxes for distortion and stuff like that. Let the amp do the work.


I don't like EMG's and I don't use distortion pedals.

I've found a couple of high-gain tube amps which got close, but I wanna shop around a bit more to see if I can find better.

And all ESP's have either Duncans or EMG's. I've tried a load of guitars with duncans made of the same wood, same construction (schecter, jackson).
#27
Hmm...this is why I was suggesting things along the line of a custom shop instrument. There are lots of good pickups out there and you really don't start to notice them till you get into the custom line up. You could always replace the pickups in the guitar, it wont defeat anything. Check out Bartolini and Lundgren. I love Lundgren's and only recently found Bartolini's. I found a used Conklin custom shop 7 string on ebay...bought it, found it had Bartolini's and because I never heard of them I was skeptical...then I plugged the guitar in and was blown away. They don't miss anything and they have a sound all unto their own, they sound amazing. I play a lot of black metal, thrash and in general, really heavy stuff. My roomies said the Conklin actually sound's attractive even with raging distortion. If you look around you'll find Bartolini pickups on lots of higher end instruments...Ibanez is doing it with their bases in the 500-800 dollar range. They're smart, the pickups deliver and they know it.