#1
Hey right now I'm running two behringer pedals in my set-up, but they eat through batteries too quickly! (god bless pound shops though, 15 BATTERIES FOR A F*CKIN' FIVER!)

Anyway I've seen that you can get power supplys so you can run it without a battery. Behringer recommend their "special" power supply but we all know that many of these companys just want you to buy more followup crap from them. And Total Guitar claimed you could get a power supply thing that would run 6 or 8 pedals at a time for £25.

So that's what I'm wondering; 1) Do you need their special power supply or can you just use a bog-standard one bought from any hardware shop that have the same specs (9V, 2.2 mm socket, 100mA current)? And 2) If and when I get a large collection of pedals is it worth buying a large multi-power supply or is it just worth buying cheap single ones?

Is it even worth just buying the cheaper adaptors from different companies? Cause on www.gak.co.uk the Behringer ones are £20 with P&P, but the Line6 ones are cheaper.


So yeah, does it need to be special, should I buy a multi-one, and where should I buy it/them from?


Thanks for listening.
#2
No you don't really need to buy specialist pedal adapters.

You would be better off with a DC brick http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Dunlop-DCBrick-MultiPower-Supply?sku=151091

Sorry about it being American, I'm tired and that was one of the first results on google.

But you can pick up one of those or similar to that from a local guitar shop or maplins (www.maplins.co.uk) for about £20-£30.

#3
You can use any generic adaptor, as long as it's 9VDV (or 9VAC depending on the pedal), 2.2 mm socket, 100mA current (preferably more than 100mA, that way you can use more pedals if you want), and most importantly, positive or negative centerpin, depending on the pedal.

You should be able to hunt around at tip shops and garage sales and find a good, suitable one.

The mA, or the current simply means how much current can go between the pedal and the adaptor. If you have 5 50mA pedals, you can run them through one 300mA adaptor with a daisy chain. (extra 50mA to be safe).

You can get daisy chains from your local music shop for a few dollars. One problem with using daisy chains though is they buzz a bit, since every pedal is not grounded.

I run my pedalboard through a 9VDC 1500mA negative centerpin adaptor with a daisychain, which works great (apart from the buzz).

Good luck finding one!
#4
Quote by guitarcrazy1991
No you don't really need to buy specialist pedal adapters.

You would be better off with a DC brick http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Dunlop-DCBrick-MultiPower-Supply?sku=151091

Sorry about it being American, I'm tired and that was one of the first results on google.

But you can pick up one of those or similar to that from a local guitar shop or maplins (www.maplins.co.uk) for about £20-£30.



Thanks I was actually looking at Maplins but it was like midnight and I was trying to watch something about stand-ups too so I kinda gave up but I'll search now.

And the American site is also a great help cause now I know what to look for!

Quote by BGSM
You can use any generic adaptor, as long as it's 9VDV (or 9VAC depending on the pedal), 2.2 mm socket, 100mA current (preferably more than 100mA, that way you can use more pedals if you want), and most importantly, positive or negative centerpin, depending on the pedal.

You should be able to hunt around at tip shops and garage sales and find a good, suitable one.

The mA, or the current simply means how much current can go between the pedal and the adaptor. If you have 5 50mA pedals, you can run them through one 300mA adaptor with a daisy chain. (extra 50mA to be safe).

You can get daisy chains from your local music shop for a few dollars. One problem with using daisy chains though is they buzz a bit, since every pedal is not grounded.

I run my pedalboard through a 9VDC 1500mA negative centerpin adaptor with a daisychain, which works great (apart from the buzz).

Good luck finding one!


What do you mean by buzz? Do you mean that the wires buzz or the sound quality of the guitar/effects etc will suffer?


Also do you think it would be worth asking a physics teacher? I figured they might know something about currents etc and possibly places to find them?
#5
http://www.maplin.co.uk/module.aspx?ITAG=SPEC&ModuleNo=31292&doy=14m10


Does that look any good? It's the same as the one TG recommended but £13 cheaper!
#6
1 spot. I was sceptic at first, but they are awesome. The battery clip for my phase 100 and Big muff is insanely awesome, and the adapter for DOD pedals is a plus, cause my dad had an old DOD octave.
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#7
The sound quality will suffer a tiny bit. Not enough to worry about though. It makes the noise that you hear when you have the amp on and the lead in and touch metal, but HEAPS quieter in the background.

Ask your science teacher if you like, if you're lucky he might be able to tell you how to ground a daisy chain or something.