#1
Yeah, is it the gain? Because with my Valvetronix, I can't do that squealy pinch harmonic, like Dime's. (EDIT: actually I can hear something, but I can barely hear it). But when it comes to the other crappy amp, I can kinda make it with a distortion pedal. Or is it because Valvetronix is a modelling amp? Thanks.
Gear
Fender Hotrod Deville 2x12
Fender MIM Strat | Epi Dot 335
Fulltone '69 mkii | Boss OD-1
'95 RAT2 | '78 IC Big Muff | DL4
Last edited by ZeroChan at Oct 13, 2007,
#3
Yup, mainly the gain.
Usually it depends on how much OD and treble you've got dialled in - using the bridge pickup helps a great deal. A strat isn't the ideal choice, though putting something like a Hot Rails pickup (or possibly a Little '59) in the bridge would be a good move if you decide to stick with them.

But still, the biggest factor has to be - groan - technique....
Billy Gibbons can get a great pinch harmonic with only a tiny bit of gain, which proves it can be done! Takes a lot of practice to get it every time though. If you're serious about try and learn harmonics unplugged, or at least using the clean channel. Then when you wind up the gain it'll seem like a piece of piss...
#4
ah, thanks bud. But does this mean my crappy 10-watter with a dist. pedal has a higher gain than my Valvetronix?
Gear
Fender Hotrod Deville 2x12
Fender MIM Strat | Epi Dot 335
Fulltone '69 mkii | Boss OD-1
'95 RAT2 | '78 IC Big Muff | DL4
#6
Quote by deluxity
it's probably the guitar, i get really cool harmonics with my ss fender and my strat copy


Probably, but the thing is, I can "kinda" do pinch harmonics in my 10-watter but not in my modelling Vox.
Gear
Fender Hotrod Deville 2x12
Fender MIM Strat | Epi Dot 335
Fulltone '69 mkii | Boss OD-1
'95 RAT2 | '78 IC Big Muff | DL4
#7
The thing is, little 10-watt combos (Kustom KGA10, BB Blaster and that...) tend to have a really trebly,piercing tone which comes from the basic gain circuits and tiny speakers they use. This amplifies the harmonics well 'cause of all the high frequencies, but with the downside that it makes your guitar sound like utter s**t...

Start with your vox on one of the high-gain models with the gain and treble turned most of the way up, then as you get better at doing harmonics, you can bring the controls down to even out the tone and get rid of that tinny bumblebee-in-a-pack-of-cornflakes sound. Eventually you'll find a compromise between decent harmonics and decent tone!

And btw, i'd say a digi Grunge will get enough gain out of any amp - it's one of the heaviest pedals i've ever heard!Not necessarily a bad thing....
#8
I'll try doing that. Thanks for the advice dude.
Gear
Fender Hotrod Deville 2x12
Fender MIM Strat | Epi Dot 335
Fulltone '69 mkii | Boss OD-1
'95 RAT2 | '78 IC Big Muff | DL4
#9
You can get pinch harmonics with NO gain..it's about technique, too. Where you pick it on the string determines what comes out. There's actually two or three places on the string between the bridge and neck where they'll pop out, and each guitar is different...you have to find their "sweet spots."
#10
Quote by fretboarddragon
You can get pinch harmonics with NO gain..it's about technique, too. Where you pick it on the string determines what comes out. There's actually two or three places on the string between the bridge and neck where they'll pop out, and each guitar is different...you have to find their "sweet spots."


Damn straight. Pinch harmonics can be done without even being plugged in if you have good technique. But it can depend on so many different things. What works great on my guitar might suck on yours, even if its the same model.

I'd say your struggling because of your guitar. It has single coils, and probably isn't shielded very well at all. A lot of harmonics that are kind of quiet get buried in the hum.