#1
Hey guys, I have a few questions that hopefully you might be able to answer.
First off, how do you harmonize? I basically completly clueless on how you would go about it. Arn't you playing the same thing just in a diff key? I really need someone to explain it to me.

Secondly, Solo's, to my knowledge, are based around the chords played during the solo.
So if the chords being played are, Em, D, C

then you would use notes from Em during em, D during D, and C during C.

That being said heres my question.

If the chords played are Em, D, C

Can you play notes out of the Em chord while the C chord is being played?


Thanks for your help in advance.
#2
There's a lot of different ways to solo. You could just arpeggiate and play the notes of the chords you're soloing over or you could play any scale you want as long as the root matches the chord or you could play in key the whole time but keep the root of the scale the same as the chord or you could play whatever the hell you want.


Edit: I think the best thing to do is to try a bunch of different ways of soloing out for yourself. Just play over some jam track and figure out how some chords and scales can clash and others can bring up different feelings (tension, happiness, etc)
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Last edited by metal4all at Oct 13, 2007,
#3
to answer your last question.

Yes. that would work well.

as for harmonizing.. you can play the same thing in a diff key, or you can also play the same thing in the same key a certain interval (say a fifth) up or down.
#4
Quote by hippie_cune
to answer your last question.

Yes. that would work well.

as for harmonizing.. you can play the same thing in a diff key, or you can also play the same thing in the same key a certain interval (say a fifth) up or down.



Could you give me a few examples?
#5
^^ Harmonizing: Suppose you want to harmonize in fifths. Play a, say, C, then the second guitar, or you, play a fifth up. (5th of C = G)

So,


6/8 time
1st Guitar

e|------------------||
B|------------------||
G|------------------||
D|------------------||
A|------------------||
E|-888-8-88--8-888--||

2nd Guitar

e|------------------||    
B|------------------||   
G|-000-0-00--0-000--|| 
D|------------------||    
A|------------------||     
E|------------------||




That's just simple harmonizing. Listen to Killswitch Engage's Rose for Sharyn to get an idea.
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Last edited by sTx at Oct 14, 2007,
#6
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Could you give me a few examples?


One way is to harmonize in diatonic thirds, meaning someone plays a note, and the other person plays a (minor third, since it's in a minor key) note a minor third up. So if someone was playing an A, at the same time, the other person would play C. Heres a bit of something I just made up, which is harmonized in diatonic thirds.
Guitar One :


E----------------------
B-5-6-5---8----------------
G----------------------
D----------------------
A----------------------
E---------------5-8-7-7---- 


And at the same time.

Guitar Two :


E----5-----7------
B-8----8----------
G---------------
D---------------
A----------------7---5-5-
E-------------8-------- 


See? Everything Guitar Two plays is a minor third above what Guitar One plays. I hope that helped.
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#7
I think the best way to do it (this is just my opinion) is in thirds. I'd let it be at Alter-Bridge's example, but Alter-Bridge did it all in straight minor thirds, while I would do it in thirds of the scale.


For example, say you were playing in Em. And the first guitar is playing a riff that's just like, E F# G F# E D E. The second guitar would be playing G A B A G F# G.
This is different than Alter Bridge's, because B is a major third to G.


If that's over your head, I'm basically telling you I stick to one scale and one scale interval when harmonizing.
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#8
Thanks for all the responses, I think im understanding harmonizing.


Quote by UtBDan
I think the best way to do it (this is just my opinion) is in thirds. I'd let it be at Alter-Bridge's example, but Alter-Bridge did it all in straight minor thirds, while I would do it in thirds of the scale.


For example, say you were playing in Em. And the first guitar is playing a riff that's just like, E F# G F# E D E. The second guitar would be playing G A B A G F# G.
This is different than Alter Bridge's, because B is a major third to G.


If that's over your head, I'm basically telling you I stick to one scale and one scale interval when harmonizing.



So your saying that Alter Bridge is wrong? The G and C won't sound good and the G and B will?
#9
"good" is not something that should be said when talking about music..

its all opinion.

if you like it.

its good enough
#10
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Thanks for all the responses, I think im understanding harmonizing.


So your saying that Alter Bridge is wrong? The G and C won't sound good and the G and B will?


I think I left out a bit when I was explaining, mine, was in the key of A Minor. Those notes being A, B, C, D, E, F and G. So when guitar one played an A, guitar two played a C. When guitar one played a D, guitar two played an F, and so on.
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#11
Quote by Galvanise69
Correct me if im wrong but A is not a minor third above F.. Or have i missed something..


I think you may have, in the post above yours I mentioned that what I posted was in the key of A Minor.

A B C D E F G A
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#12
yer but thats not a minor third, thats a major third.... A to F is 4 frets, not three
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#13
yes, the notes are not what I was pointing out, alter: its that you said only harmonize in minor thirds.


If you did that, you'd only harmonize in straight minor chords, which would sound cool I guess, but I would rather harmonize diatonically.


If this is way over your head, what Alter-bridge originally suggested was to harmonize in an interval of a minor third all the time.
For example, if the first guitar played E, F#, G, in Alter-bridge's method, the second guitar would play G, A, Bb.
I would suggest harmonizing diatonically, or in thirds of the scale. As such, if we were in Em, and you played E, F#, G, I would suggest the second guitar would play G, A, B.


The difference is the G to B is a major third. This is different because it is harmonizing within the notes of the key, instead of just picking an interval and sticking to it.


I hope this makes sense.


Quote by Alter-Bridge
One way is to harmonize in diatonic thirds, meaning someone plays a note, and the other person plays a (minor third, since it's in a minor key) note a minor third up.



Im basically nitpicking that statement. Because in a minor key, not all thirds are minor thirds.
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#14
Sorry about that, you're right, I guess I didn't know as much about it as I thought I did. *Shame*. And sorry, I was meant to say "DIATONIC" thirds.
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Last edited by Alter-Bridge at Oct 17, 2007,
#15
Look the MT FAQ for more information.

The typical harmonization are in: fifths, diatonic thirds, diatonic sixths.

EDIT:

I didn't red your post entirely.
I think you should actually begin with learning some basic theory, and then move on harmonization.

Again, start with MT FAQ and lessons on this site.
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Last edited by DarTHie at Oct 17, 2007,