#1
First Question:

If you have a song with the chord progression of E C G, then how do you know what scales go over for a solo? Or could you direct me to a lessson that helps me find the answer?

Second Question:

If you put a capo on your guitar does that become 0 for tabs?
For example if a tab says capo on 2nd fret, then tells you to play on the third fret that is really the fifth right?
#2
1. You solo in the key of the song, which would probably be E in your case. Or you could change scales with the progression

2. Almost all of the time. If it's from a magazine, book or program, then yes. You should be able to find out pretty fast by playing it.

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#4
Usually the cord which brings resolution to the progression( or usually your first chord in this case the E) is what scale your going to use but depending on the progression you may have to alter it to fit the cord being played (based on the notes within that cord) and you would have to alter the scale being played.

In short if your playing within a key you play that corresponding scale with it and alter it depending on the chord being played.
Last edited by O00Coolzero00O at Oct 14, 2007,
#5
You use the root of the chord progression. So if the chord progression is E, C, G, then your solo should root in E. If you don't understand that, you need to learn the notes of your fretboard, along with some basic scales.

If you use a capo, 0 becomes whatever fret the capo is on. So in your example, if your capo is on the 2nd fret, 0 becomes 2, and so on. So yeah, you're right, but the tab should take the capo into consideration unless it's a bad tab. If it says at the beginning to capo 2, then says play 3, it should be assumed that 3 is actually 5.
#6
well, I know that the C major chord (and corresponding scale) is based upon a triad of C E G and E C G is the first inversion of said major chord (I'm almost sure of that) so a C major scale would probably work, tho you need to watch out for the A minor scale, which is basically the same scale as C maj and can get into your playing failry easily if you're not careful
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#7
Quote by Garou1911
You use the root of the chord progression. So if the chord progression is E, C, G, then your solo should root in E. If you don't understand that, you need to learn the notes of your fretboard, along with some basic scales.

If you use a capo, 0 becomes whatever fret the capo is on. So in your example, if your capo is on the 2nd fret, 0 becomes 2, and so on. So yeah, you're right, but the tab should take the capo into consideration unless it's a bad tab. If it says at the beginning to capo 2, then says play 3, it should be assumed that 3 is actually 5.


Thanks for the replies

I got the capo thing.... I dont even own a capo yet... I was just curious!!

About the soloing... What does Soloing around a root E mean? I understand most the different scales etc. What if I want to use a Pentonic scale... or the Blues scale?
#8
Rooting in E means your solo starts and resolves on an E note. I was thinking about it, and Breakdown by Tom Petty is a great example of what you're talking about (verse portion). The rythem starts and resolves on an A major chord, while the solo he plays over it is a little minor pentatonic lick that starts and ends on an A note.

Learning note intervals helps a ton with this. The intervals are:

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - A
- w - h - w- w - h- w- w

W=Whole Step, or two frets.
H=Half Step, or one fret.

That formula will help you find the notes on the fretboard so you can piece them together. The steps refer to the distance of the notes from one another on the fretboard. So if you start on your low E string for instance, open would be E, then if you go up one half-step to the first fret, you're now on F. One whole step up from that (2 frets), you're now on the 3rd fret, which would be G, and so forth. If it makes it easier to remember (and I find it does), just remember that the only half-steps are between B-C, and E-F.

On a side note, sorry if I sounded like an ass in my earlier post. Not intended :/

-Edit- Almost forgot. In relation to scales, root referrs to the note the scale starts on. So a Pentatonic minor scale 6th string root in the key of A means that it's a minor pentatonic scale that starts on an A note on the low E string. Sorry if this is all a bit much to digest, it's the basics of music theory, which I'd suggest reading up on so you get a better idea of what I'm talking about. Hope that helps

-Edit #2(lol)- You'll also notice that at the end of the scale, the note repeats on the 12th fret (the one with two dots). That's because it's the same note, just one octave (pitch) higher. At that point, the scale starts over. When you write scales, still using the low E as an example, you would actually stop on D because that's the end of the scale in that octave. So while there are 8 notes up there, the scale actually contains only 7 notes because the two Es are tonic (same tone on different pitches). Again, probably a bit much to digest. Check out some FAQs/lessons on theory, it'll help more then I can. lol
Last edited by Garou1911 at Oct 14, 2007,
#9
The naming of three chords does not give enough info to determine the best soloing. It depends on more than that. Like the progression and which chord is used dominantly (basically the most used, almost always the first and/or last chord in the progression). Also, if your playing the full chords or bar chords (without the 3rds) you can do more with the soloing. Purely speaking...These chords are not part of the same scale/key.... The E scale/key will not work because it has both an C# and G# in it (not good with the C and G chords). The C scale/key or G scale/key won't work because the E chord has a G# in it and the C and G chord/scale/key has a natural G in it. IF.....the E were in fact an E minor chord (with the 3rd being a G instead of a G#) well that changes everything and makes things fit nicely into a G or Em scale/key. So, in the end,...depending on the dominant chord, MAJOR or minor, you could use any of these scales if you watch for the incidental G# in the E. There, clear as mud.
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