#1
I've been playing since the end of the summer and already got stuck in a band as the bassist (turns out we're scarce lol).

Well what I'm wondering is, if the guitarist were to say, 'lets play in the key of F major' (for example). What would that mean for me? As far as I understand it means only notes from the F major scale would mostly sound good with what the guitarist was playing, but then people tell me that there are other scales that would as well.

What scales can be played as part of the same 'key' i guess is another question.

thanks
#2
you can play the relative minor scale
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    #3
    Quote by dsaanm
    you can play the relative minor scale


    Don't confuse him
    (those are the same notes)


    But anyway, any notes from the F major scale will sound good in context, but don't be afraid to go off-key. You can really use any scales or modes that you want, and it will likely sound good as long as you keep using F as your base note.
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    #4
    ^yea, depended on note choice, major minor is not that important, just learn all the sharps and flats and you should be fine just playing simple progressions
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    #5
    The most important thing is not the scale but the chords. The chords your guitarist is playing, let's say F Bb and C, will decide what you're playing. Since all of these chords are major triads you'll want to emphasis the 1-3-5 in each chord (F-A-C, Bb-D-F, C-E-G) but you can still play other notes in the scale that chord lends to. For all of these, since they're major then play notes from each major scale in between your chord tones, to get from one to the other, always emphasizing chord tones. (Emphasizing as in using those as your resting note or notes you come to most often in a line). If the chords were different say: F Gmin and Dmin then play the major scale tones for your F and play Gmin and Dmin chord tones as your emphasis and the minor scales as your in betweens. That's for making basslines.

    If your guitarist wants you to solo (you lucky ma****) then you could play a major scale or a major pentatonic (a major scale with no 4 or 7). I'm guessing the scales your cohorts were talking about were modes, which at this time in your bass playing career, and most likely for what you're doing, are unnecessary.
    #6
    Quote by Confused4930
    Don't confuse him
    (those are the same notes)


    OK I'm sry... also what he said
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      #7
      haha thanks for the replies, i start lessons soon as well so those should explain this stuff more.

      and whadda you mean by, 'just learn all the sharps and flats and you should be fine just playing simple progressions'
      #8
      Quote by dsaanm
      you can play the relative minor scale


      The relative minor is 3 notes down from the major scale you're playing in.

      Eg: C major has no sharps or flats, count back three (C, B, A) and you get A minor, which also has no sharps or flats.

      Now, F major, which was your example, if I remember. It has one flat, which is B flat.

      Count back three (F, E, D) and you get D minor, which also has B flat.
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      #10
      Quote by d K A p S
      ^ thanks a lot, that explained it a little more too..


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      #12
      Quote by d K A p S



      Okay, well the letter in bold, is the major key, the notes marked on the treble clef are either the sharps or flats in the scale that you have to play to be in key.

      The faded gray letters are the relative minor i.e. the minor key with the same key signature. To get the next one

      eg C+5 (C, D, E, F, G) = G major.

      Then you take the letter before the scale you have just arrived at, and sharpen it. Here it is f, so the key signature is F#. The relative minor is E minor.

      G+5 = D major has F# and C# (letter before new scale.)

      Get it now?
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      #14
      yes, any notes in the key can be played anywhere on the neck (any octave) and sound right in the song