#1
I have been wondering what effect the type of wood used in a guitar has on its sound. I always thought the pickups determined most of the sound, so I am curious
#2
lighter woods give a brighter sound (think strat, alder and such) heavier woods give darker sound (think Les Paul, mahogany)
#3
the amp probably determines the most (with effects)

Some wood is heavier and more dense and that changes the sound a little

passive pickups work with the wood and you can hear the change a little better
actives are different

idk how to explain well
#4
its a combo of a few things....wood, p/u's, the player, etc....
different wood(s) have different density's which cause the sound to resonate in a different manner...

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#6
also, as well as the density of the wood affecting the sound slightly, it also changes the weight, which is an important factor for gigging guitars
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#8
The thing with wood is, you could get 2 guitars made from the same billet, made by the same person, with identical hardwear, pups & finish. One could sound great and the other terrible. Its just how it goes
#9
Quote by jscustomguitars
Click below, this should give you a basic idea of what different woods sound like


CLICK !

Read that for the tone properties of various wood species. Also, savvier musicians would say that the amp has the biggest contribution to your tone.

#10
Thanks, thats alot of help. So for example, how does the wood in a Epiphone differ from that of a Gibson?
#11
Lesser quality woods used by Epiphone, dont even think they use mahogany for the bodys.
Saying that though, ive done a couple a repairs on newish Gibbo's recently and im sure there not using good quality mahogany any more. . . . . . . .
#13
Quote by Ippon
Read that for the tone properties of various wood species. Also, savvier musicians would say that the amp has the biggest contribution to your tone.


no...savvier musicians would say that everything contributes to your tone and the amp is just a part...
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#14
Quote by patriotplayer90
Thanks, thats alot of help. So for example, how does the wood in a Epiphone differ from that of a Gibson?

Both are available in Mahogany and Korina. Obviously the Gibson feels better out of the box. My friend has a Gibby and every time I go to GC, I always play the White Gibby. I have 2 Epi Explorers, both Mahogany with the Ebony fretboard (actually the FR version is with a friend) and since they're broken in, play extremely well.

I'm just as conscious about tone as the next tone freak, but through various tube amps and with the same Gibby PUs, they sure sound very similar. Again, the Gibby is set up better, new.

#15
Quote by DagMX
no...savvier musicians would say that everything contributes to your tone and the amp is just a part...

no ... read it in proper context. between the wood and the amp, the amp selection would be more noticeable as far as tone. kinda like using the same Gibson LP through a tube amp, then through a SS Fender or Marshall MG ... the same musician would say the SS fender and mg sound like buzzing bees. the amp is a huge part of tone.
#16
Quote by Ulrik
no ... read it in proper context. between the wood and the amp, the amp selection would be more noticeable as far as tone. kinda like using the same Gibson LP through a tube amp, then through a SS Fender or Marshall MG ... the same musician would say the SS fender and mg sound like buzzing bees. the amp is a huge part of tone.

in a situation where only the amp and wood are considered yes..
but I'm going to get a much more biting twangy sound out of an alder maple tele than im going to get out of a mahogany les-paul.

IMO, both parts are equally important. Theres no point having a great guitar with great dynamics if the amp is going to kill the sound and theres no point feeding a great amp with a crap guitar if its going to sound muddy.

shit goes in shit comes out. Good food goes in and shit comes out but it will sound better when it hits the water.
I've developed a complex where everytime I hear a Lamb of God song, I burst out laughing

My 7 String V build
My Main Guitars:
Kramer Striker FR-2027SM 7 String
BC Rich Afterburner Warlock
Washburn Xb100 Bass
My Effect(s)/Misc:
Digitech RP350
#17
Quote by Ulrik
no ... read it in proper context. between the wood and the amp, the amp selection would be more noticeable as far as tone. kinda like using the same Gibson LP through a tube amp, then through a SS Fender or Marshall MG ... the same musician would say the SS fender and mg sound like buzzing bees. the amp is a huge part of tone.



#18
Quality of the wood has almost as much to do with tone as the type of wood does.

A high quality slab of mahogany isn't going to be excessivly dark, flabby, and uncontrolled but, more ariculated, extremely powerful, and fat.

A cheap alder guitar is going to be bright but lack definition in the higher ranges while a better slab of alder will be great all around.
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#19
Quote by makuserusukotto
lighter woods give a brighter sound (think strat, alder and such) heavier woods give darker sound (think Les Paul, mahogany)


then again basswood is light, but isnt that bright
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Quote by Dempsey68
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#20
Quote by the boogieman
then again basswood is light, but isnt that bright


basswood is pretty bright. It is better known for its resonance though.
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#21
Quote by makuserusukotto
lighter woods give a brighter sound (think strat, alder and such) heavier woods give darker sound (think Les Paul, mahogany)


Za? Denser woods are brighter, not lighter woods. Mahogany is a soft wood and therefore has a darker tone while maple is a much denser, harder wood and therefore has a brighter tone.
#22
The way the sound travels through the wood, if you've ever wondered why aged wood is better its because the wood is drier and sound travels better (my teacher owns a 200 year old violin. XD)
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