#1
Help PLEASE!

can any1 explain how a photocell or light dependent resistor actually works. i understand it converts light into electric current but how??? i dont want a complicated college scientific explanation but a simple one!!!
thx all
"98% of us will die at some point in our lives"
#4
It's not a simple device.
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I developed a thought experiment to explain why you can't remember anything before you were born:
#5
It's probably down the photoelectric effect. Wiki it
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Last edited by Yakult at Oct 14, 2007,
#6
Quote by minibrowny
Just asking, have you tried google?

ive found explanations but only unbeleivably complex ones that explain all about different atoms changing place and ****...just tryna find an explanation thats easy to understand!
"98% of us will die at some point in our lives"
#7
It is a resistor that is dependant on light.

There's your simple explanation
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#8
I'm fairly sure that photocells and LDRs work differently, but I could well be wrong :P I did a project on photocells at university last year, so had to do a bit about how they work. I can't remember it exactly, but I think it's something like this:

Photocells are made of two plates, both made mostly of silicon, but one side has an element with one more electron than silicon (can't remember which) scattered throughout, and the other side contains an element with one less electron than silicon. This makes one plate negative, and one positive, creating a type of semicondictor diode called a p-n junction. Photons (i.e. light) fall on the negative side (the one with extra electrons), and basically knock the extra electrons out of their atoms, leaving a silicon atom and a free electron.

Because the electron has a negative charge, and is in the negative plate of the photocell, it is repelled, towards the positive plate. This creates a current
#9
Quote by HarrisonCharles
ive found explanations but only unbeleivably complex ones that explain all about different atoms changing place and ****...just tryna find an explanation thats easy to understand!


Whoops, my bad.

Basically one side has extra electons (so is negative), and the other side has less electrons (so is positive). The light knocks the extra electrons out of the negative bit, and being negative they are attracted to the positive bit, creating a current. Hope that helps
#11
Quote by HarrisonCharles
Help PLEASE!

can any1 explain how a photocell or light dependent resistor actually works. i understand it converts light into electric current but how??? i dont want a complicated college scientific explanation but a simple one!!!
thx all


howstuffworks.com should have something on it...
#12
Quote by HarrisonCharles
Help PLEASE!

can any1 explain how a photocell or light dependent resistor actually works. i understand it converts light into electric current but how??? i dont want a complicated college scientific explanation but a simple one!!!
thx all

a photocell has chemicals in it which, when struck by a photon (light), release an electron. this electron travels around a circuit, and does whatever it is supposed to.
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