#1
Is there such a thing in music? I wrote this pretty decent thrash song the other day with a very marty friedman-esque solo. I want to learn the solo, but it is way above my skill level. I realize that I can't just learn the same difficulty of stuff if I want to improve, but is there a point where it's better to wait until I become better?
#2
Push your self.
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i'm just a litte too shallow to consider
that maybe i've been a little more eager
each day to wake up and take a shower
brush my teeth and smile for the mirror
#4
The only way to get better fast is to try stuff that is clearly beyond your skill level.
#5
Quote by Chaingarden
The only way to get better fast is to try stuff that is clearly beyond your skill level.

I'm not looking to get better "fast". I want to do things that will help me improve gradually and not rush it.
#6
You said you wrote it, but you want to learn it? Did you write it on GP or something?
#8
Quote by Chaingarden
The only way to get better fast is to try stuff that is clearly beyond your skill level.


Well, its really all in how you approach it.

Strapping on a pair of skis on someone who's never skied and pushing them down
an expert slope isn't going to get them better faster. Mostly it will just get them hurt
and frustrated.

Don't think of any song as being "out of your league". It's more like how many
problems will you have to overcome and how much skill will you need to gain in
order to play it. Break it down and break it down some more until you're dealing
with the things within your reach. Then start working on them. It's just a matter
of time and effort.

An insanely hard song will probably take you a long time because you'll have to
deal with many many problems. An easier song will be quicker. Either way,
you'll still gain skills with the effort.
#9
Quote by Spamwise
Is there such a thing in music? I wrote this pretty decent thrash song the other day with a very marty friedman-esque solo. I want to learn the solo, but it is way above my skill level. I realize that I can't just learn the same difficulty of stuff if I want to improve, but is there a point where it's better to wait until I become better?


Im not sure I understand you. Are you saying you wrote something on like GP or something rather than your guitar, and what you wrote is beyond your ability to play it?

If so you really only have a couple of choices. Practice it up untill you can play it, or write something that you can play.

If you really like what you wrote, I would suggested practicing it and see if you can actually play it. Like edg said, youll get something out of it just for the effort.

If you find that you absolultey cant play it .... well plan 2, write another solo.

If you are writing in GP, an important lesson can be learned from this. When writing music, consider the abilities of the person thats going to play it.

Great writers and arrangers always consider who they are writing for, and try to take advantage of strengths, and avoid weaknesses of that player.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 14, 2007,
#10
i guess most of everyone have outlined that you should try and write stuff that your capable of playing, especially when using a tool like powertab or gp, you can easily get carried away with creating something epic that you wish you could play

also, is using GP or powertab some kind of new craze that people are using to write songs? why not try using your real guitar, a pen and some paper? then you would be able to get a true feeling of your capabilities
#11
Quote by beau05
i guess most of everyone have outlined that you should try and write stuff that your capable of playing, especially when using a tool like powertab or gp, you can easily get carried away with creating something epic that you wish you could play

also, is using GP or powertab some kind of new craze that people are using to write songs? why not try using your real guitar, a pen and some paper? then you would be able to get a true feeling of your capabilities

i wrote most of the song before I put it in power tab. i just use it because it allows me to get my ideas put down in a neat orderly fashion.


If you find that you absolultey cant play it .... well plan 2, write another solo.

If you are writing in GP, an important lesson can be learned from this. When writing music, consider the abilities of the person thats going to play it.


yeah I agree. I normally write the solos first, but since I can't "shred" that wasn't really an option.

thanks for the replies. I think it'd be a good idea to wait a little longer before tackling it.
#12
Quote by Spamwise
Is there such a thing in music? I wrote this pretty decent thrash song the other day with a very marty friedman-esque solo. I want to learn the solo, but it is way above my skill level. I realize that I can't just learn the same difficulty of stuff if I want to improve, but is there a point where it's better to wait until I become better?


Can I get the tab? Haha.

But really, all you need to do is take it really slow. You'll get it with time and practice. Just a matter of practicing it slowly and getting it accurate and clean. Then gradually making it faster.
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#13
How fast is gradually? I hear many people say different things and I want to see what you think.
#14
Quote by Spamwise
How fast is gradually? I hear many people say different things and I want to see what you think.


I normally master it at one speed, then kick it up anywhere from 5 - 10 bpm. If it's too much, i'll lower it down and try it at only 2 - 4 bpm above my mastered tempo.
~ Gear ~
Epiphone Les Paul
Crate GX-80
Quote by Guitarist132
Finish the quote

"This is _______"
Quote by Aqua Dementia
SPAAAAAAAARRRRTTTAAA! No?
Quote by Guitarist132
Incorrect, the correct answer was papua new guinea

Quote by Aqua Dementia
Whoa, I'm in your sig.
#15
Quote by monkeyboyjr
I normally master it at one speed, then kick it up anywhere from 5 - 10 bpm. If it's too much, i'll lower it down and try it at only 2 - 4 bpm above my mastered tempo.

Yeah, there isn't any rule that says you should increase the speed by 1 bpm every 17 minutes of playing or something. If you're having difficulties, set the metronome to the tempo you are comfortable playing the song at, no matter how slow. When you can play it perfectly at that speed, increase the speed by 5-10 bpm. Once you can play it smoothly at that tempo, you can kick it up another notch.

How long it takes to learn something and get it up to speed is very individual, and it also depends on the song, of course. So I guess what "gradually" means depends on each player, the important thing is that you don't try to rush it, because that will only make your playing sloppy.