#1
Hai Guys!

I'm sure most of us who have played guitar for over 1 day realize the different sounds between open chords [meaning 0 fret] and barre chords. And if i play say and F chord, i will have to barre it, but if i capo the first then i can play it as E open.

What i am getting at is i wish to know if there is some program, or internet device that will allow me to type in a few chords, and it will tell me where to capo and what chords to play there.

I think that would be super. Anyone know of anything to this nature??

-Thanks =]

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#5
I'm in no way bashing capos or anything, but I believe if you just learn to barre you can be alot more flexible with you're music, besides, barring strengthens your fingers, and it's a challenging thing to work on if you're just starting.
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#7
You don't need a program. If you move everything up a fret, then the chord goes half a step up.

So if you barre the first fret for an F-major, then barring the second fret will give you an F#-major, and so on.
#9
Quote by Crepe
And if he didn't use a capo he would be 20x better then me

for sure


Idiot, it's a way to change your tuning without having to move the tuners. You can experiment with different tunings. It does not make playing guitar any easier.
#11
The problem with barre chords is that many of them are the same voicings (most will play in either the shape of an E or an A, though some guitarists use others, and I like them). I like to use a capo to give chords a different tonality. Depending on which "key" I play in (relative to the capo) I can get a different mood from the exact same chords, just by rearranging which notes go where.

If you're a lead guitarist, no way should you be using a capo. But if you're a rhythm guitarist, a capo is very useful to you.
#12
Quote by Virgil_Hart05
but he's fat


yeah haha that knocks off like half of his skill
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#13
capos are not for losers, just n00bs.
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#15
I suggest learning some simple chord theory. Just learning root notes will makes you just as flexible as using a capo.

And to those dissing the capo..ever heard of Albert Collins?
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#17
I dislike capos only because sometimes they make chord transcriptions a bitch to transpose.

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#18
Capos are for losers and n00bs? James Taylor, Mike Ness, Bob Mould, etc. all use capos. Hardly losers and/or n00bs. It's just another tool you can use to create great music. If it works for you then use it.
#19
Quote by isuckhardcore
I'm in no way bashing capos or anything, but I believe if you just learn to barre you can be alot more flexible with you're music, besides, barring strengthens your fingers, and it's a challenging thing to work on if you're just starting.

+1
#20
honestly, open chords are not that hard to learn.

barre chords i can understand using a capo, but open chords. >_>

well, I don't even know how you would go about such an act.
#21
Quote by Shylock
honestly, open chords are not that hard to learn.

barre chords i can understand using a capo, but open chords. >_>

well, I don't even know how you would go about such an act.


Well, if you want to play an open C shape higher up the register, it's easier to place a capo on, say, the 5th fret, then to barre the 5th fret and finger a C at the same time. It's possible, though. However, very hard if you want to play an open G shape at the 5th fret.
#22
All you guys are dumb, except for the ones who actually know what a capo is for.

It's for changing the tuning, not to make playing easier, or ANYTHING like that. Say you aren't that good of a singer in E, but you learn a song in E, and you have to perform it that night, move the capo up to G, and bam, it's now in your vocal range, it's a device solely to change the key you are playing in. Who cares if you don't have to transpose the chords into another key, it's about how the music sounds, not looks.
#23
Quote by metaldud536
Idiot, it's a way to change your tuning without having to move the tuners. You can experiment with different tunings.


Not exactly. You can change between keys easily, but no capo will make your standard-tuned guitar into open-F, or open-D, or even drop-D.
#24
Quote by kirkadolph
yeah haha that knocks off like half of his skill

I imagine that being fat would hinder your guitar playing speed more than helping it, so it actually increases his skill.

Also, I have no idea what the threadstarter is asking, but capos FTW.
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#25
first of all, theres a difference between 6 and 3 string capos, and second, I didn't mean that only n00bs play them, just that most chords can be played solid and eadsily enough without them by decent guitarists. I mostly use them for 2 or 3 fret adjustments, as well as lowering action on my acoustic... also I tune to Eb and capo 1st so I have low action and low string tension, as well as srv tuning by removing it.
but theres a difference to how capos are used by n00bs and professionals. when I was new, I used capos for every song, because chords were uncomfortable being a bassist previously. andy mckee uses them for alternate wacky tunings and normally impossible stuff, and glen phillips, one of my favorite guitarists, uses a capo on 6th to match his vocal range.

another example is soloing in blues, playing in E will sound way different than A or G, but using a capo to get the A or G scale will make it sound no different than the E music wise. cpos can ruin your improv a bit If you overuse them, they make your stuff sound all the same.
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But really, asking the pit for relationship advice is like asking a girl with braces for a blowjob. Ouch.

Quote by Lil Macker
i first masterbated when i was... 10, i think
or was it 9...
yeah 10
and i'm catholic, don't tell the pope, i'll be holy watered
#26
List of people I have seen play with a capo:

Pete Townshend
Neil Young
Richard Thompson
Albert Collins
Doc Watson
Lindsey Buckingham
Roy Rogers
Muddy Waters
Bonnie Raitt

These are all better guitarists than anyone who has posted in this thread.


As to the original topic, all you have to do to figure out chords with a capo is count. Count down a number of half steps equal to the number of the fret the capo is on from the chord you want to get the chord you have to finger. For example, to play an A chord with a capo at fret 2, you'd finger a G chord.
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