#1
So you know how most tabs give you a diagram of the chord you are trying to play? Most of them show X's where you are supposed to put your fingers, but what about when a O appears on a string? What does that mean?
#3
I thought that at first, but sometimes the O will appear in between some X's and other strings inbetween will not have a mark at all. So, since it's impossible to not play the strings with no mark on them, I thought those must be open strings. If those are open strings also, then I thought the ones with the O on them might be something else.
#4
Can you give me an example of the kind of chord diagram you're talking about?
#7
I see what you mean and it's is a strange thing to come across. I vaguely know this song and if I remember correctly the strings are picked and not strumed so I'm guessing that you don't pick the string with the O, that's not 100% but I'm assuming that's what it means. Personally I'd just strum the chord the way it's suppose to be - 022030. Hope that's of some help to you. Let me know how it works out for you.
#8
Sorry...still somewhat of a newbie...are you saying that I should hold down the A AND the D strings with my second (middle) finger? I've been playing it like this - 020030 - and it sounds okay to me. I have been stumming all 6 strings. Thanks for the help.
#10
Generally on tab 0 is open string, x is muted/unplayed, and numbers are frets. Similarly on chord diagrams the x usually means muted or unplayed string and o means open string, like in this case:



But some times on scale/chord diagrams I've seen people use x and o to show where you place your fingers/the notes to be played are, with the o showing root notes and the x other notes. Example (A major scale):


e|---|---|---|-x-|-o-|---|---|---|---|
B|---|---|---|---|-x-|---|-x-|---|---|
G|---|---|---|-x-|---|-x-|-x-|---|---|
D|---|---|---|-x-|---|-x-|-o-|---|---|
A|---|---|---|-x-|-x-|---|-x-|---|---|
E|---|---|---|---|-o-|---|-x-|---|---|


Example (G major chord):



e|---|---|-o-|---|
B|---|---|---|---|
G|---|---|---|---|
D|---|---|---|---|
A|---|-x-|---|---|
E|---|---|-o-|---|



Usually when I've seen that done it's been in print, in magazines or what have you, and rather than x and o different colours are used to show the root notes. On the G chord I just posted you can see that there's a G on the open G string, but it can't be shown to be a root with an o, which is why the different colour method is useful as it gets round that problem:


e|---|---|-[color="red"]o[/color]-|---|
B|---|---|---|---|
[color="red"]G[/color]|---|---|---|---|
D|---|---|---|---|
A|---|-o-|---|---|
E|---|---|-[color="red"]o[/color]-|---|



So that may be why there's an o there on your Em7, I don't know why it would be there to indicate an open string 'cause the other strings being played open don't have o on them.

Also, the reason you playing:



e|---|---|---|
B|---|---|-x-|
G|---|---|---|
D|---|---|---|
A|---|-x-|---|
E|---|---|---|


rather than:

e|---|---|---|
B|---|---|-x-|
G|---|---|---|
D|---|-x-|---|
A|---|-x-|---|
E|---|---|---|


still sounded ok is because it's still an Em7 chord.

To be honest I don't pay much attention to the chord diagrams that come up on tabs like the one you linked (where you hover over the blue letters) because I think (not sure) they're just chosen automatically by the computer. Say a song has these chords:


e|---10---0---5---
B|---10---0---5---
G|---11---1---6---
D|---12---2---7---
A|---12---2---7---
E|---10---0---5---


But the person writing the tab just wrote D, E, A. The computer might show you:



e|---5---7---0
B|---7---9---2
G|---7---9---2
D|---7---9---2
A|---5---7---0
E|---x---x---x


So... yeah I've waffled way too much, in those chord diagrams I'd just take the o to mean the same as an x.

(If any body spots a mistake in there somewhere shout at me, I'm still half asleep )