#1
Ok, I understand how chords are constructed, and I know what Keys are, however I was wondering if someone can fill me in on how Keys are constructed? Meaning if you are in the key of C Major, what will determine your chord choices that would keep it in the proper key? Thanks a lot!
#2
The order of the chords in a Major key are always: Major (I), Minorv(II), Minor (III), Major (IV), Major (V), Minor (VI), and Diminished VII. So in the key of C it'd be, C Major, D Minor, E Minor, F major, G major, A minor, B diminished.
#3
Quote by Spamwise
The order of the chords in a Major key are always: Major (I), Minorv(II), Minor (III), Major (IV), Major (V), Minor (VI), and Diminished VII. So in the key of C it'd be, C Major, D Minor, E Minor, F major, G major, A minor, B diminished.



Thanks, but how do you figure this? And how is it for Minor?
#5
You can take the formula for each type of chord (R 3 5 for major, r b3 5 for minor, and R b3 b5 for diminished). It's easiest to just memorize the order of the types of chords and just apply it to every key. For minor keys, you start at the VI chord. So it'd be Minor (I), Diminished (II), Major (III), Minor (IV), Minor (V), Major (VI), Major (VII).
#6
Quote by CousticStrangla
Thanks, but how do you figure this? And how is it for Minor?

The chords are determined based on the notes in the scale. Take C major for example: C D E F G A B

The first chord (I) would obviously be C major. We count the first, the third and the fifth chord in the scale: (C) D (E) F (G) A B - the ones in paranthesises are the notes played in a C major chord. We do the same for the second chord, which is a D, but move it a tone up: C (D) E (F) G (A) B. Now we have to look at the third in the D chord in order to determine whether it's major or minor - you can do this by looking up the chords, do the theory or simply count the frets from the first note to the third (3 frets up = minor, 4 frets = major) - we find that it's a D minor. You do the same with all the notes in the C major scale and come up with the pattern major (I), minor(II), minor (III), major (IV), major (V), minor (VI), and then the seventh chord is diminished, because the distance from the first note (B) to the fifth note (F) is a half-step smaller than usual giving you a diminished fifth. The definition of a diminished chord is that it has a minor third and a diminished fifth. You use the same procedure with the minor scale to find it's chord progression.
I'm a communist. Really.