#1
as the title suggests, i don't have any quick phrase to describe this problem so i'll have to describe it. It's happened on both my guitars and its also happened on the guitar of a friend of mines.

Pretty much, when you tune all the strings, it'll sound fine if you play a chord down the far end of the neck. However, as you move up the string, it gets flatter and flatter until it's nearly an entire semi-tone flat. i.e. the 5th fret on the D string will found like an open G string, but the 17th fret on the D string will be sharper than the 12th fret on the G string, even though they should both just be an octave higher.

Can anyone else tell me if they've had this problem, and if so what causes it, how to prevent it and how to fix it?
#2
your intonation is out.

search for guides on how to correct your intonation
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#3
if ur guitar is out of tune at the 12th fret, it will make ur solos sound wrong.


SETTING INTONATION: from icepoint...
Most electric guitars provide individual string length adjustment for setting intonation. Fine tuning this length insures that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar to pitch.
One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and then play the fretted 12th fret note.
If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
Repeat the procedure on all strings until the harmonic and the fretted notes are the same


if you have a hard time getting tha harminic then compare the open and fretted 12th note.
and retune the open string after every adjustment.

for which screw to turn, depends on which guitar you have.
Jenneh

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#4
yeah, it's just intonation problems. hopefully not on an accoustic. if so, you're pretty close to f*cked. but electric is easy. a good quick fix is as follows:

first of all, intonation is a direct effect of string length from nut to bridge. the actual 12th fret wire should be EXACTLY, to the micrometer, 1/2 the distance from nut to bridge saddle. a quick way to test this is to sound your natural harmonic at the 12th, then fret the 12th. these two notes should be EXACTLY the same. if the fretted note is flat of the harmonic, the string is too long, and you should move the bridge saddle closer to the nut. a quick adustment in this fashion to all of your strings should fix the problem immensely. but to get it perfect you are actually going to have to take some measurements. this can be accomplished by taking it in to your local shop for a "setup" which should be quick and cheap if they aren't attempting to rip you off.

EDIT: dang! jj beat me to it...
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#5
not to be redundant, but intonation strikes again....take it to a guitar shop
#6
Is this on your warrior? If it is, take it to a shop and have them show you. Intonating Floyds is horrible to begin with, and you have potential to screw things up if you don't know what you're doing.
#8
right ok intonation... when you say change the string length, what do i twist/cut/pull to change that?
#9
Quote by Jmz123
right ok intonation... when you say change the string length, what do i twist/cut/pull to change that?


you adjust the bridge saddles to adjust the overall length of the strings.

the method is different for each type of bridge but that's the general idea.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#10
Quote by Lemoninfluence
you adjust the bridge saddles to adjust the overall length of the strings.

the method is different for each type of bridge but that's the general idea.



for a Floyd Rose Tremolo?
#11
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/gear_maintenance/intonation.html

http://www.floydrose.com/originaltremolo.html

it's a bit fiddly with a FR so you might wanna take it to a tech to do it but those links should explain all you need to know
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#12
oh, FR, damn. you're on your own..... take it to a tech
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#13
ah ok thanks. how do i stop it happening again? because before now all ive done is change the strings and the problems sorted, so is there an easier way?
#14
changing strings fixed it? strange. that shouldnt have happened. once you set it correctly, it shouldn't go out of spec for a very long time if at all. i dont know why it would have fixed itself by a string change. check out an article on how to set FR intonation in order to get it done correctly.
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#15
Quote by Jmz123
ah ok thanks. how do i stop it happening again? because before now all ive done is change the strings and the problems sorted, so is there an easier way?



if you find ur floyd guitar falls out of tune, it's usually because the bridge is lifted.

different string gauges pull against the headstock at different tensions. so that means you probably picked a gauge better suited to how tight you have the bridge set up.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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#16
I wouldn't recommend taking your guitar to a tech. It's good to be able to do at least basic mintenance like changing strings and adjusting intonation by yourself. There's not a lot of wrong that you can do by accidently turning the wrong knob or screw, so just try to do it yourself. It's a good skill.
\,,/_[><]_\,,/
#17
definitely. but sometimes, as in the case with a floyd, it's good to have it decently set up to provide a good control group as it were. but yeah, it's a shame when people can't handle the little stuff like stringing, intonating, setting action, neck bow, etc. and it feeds an industry already bloated by a general lack of knowledge in it's consumers. but i myself can't instruct off hand how to intonate a floyd. i have done it before, but i can't direct which screw to turn, etc. w/o one in front of me or at least a good pic. but yeah, if he changed string gauges, it would change the set of the floyd, but i don't think it would do it radically enough to correct his intonation issue, since essentially the same pivot point is applied on the strings no matter where the floyd rests. but if it worked, hey, more power to 'em. but i would suggest learning everything about basic setup of your bridge system.
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#18
right ok so if the bridge is off balance, then it's probably changing the intonation, meaning I have to have the bridge set dead straight?

Damn, i hate guitars now