#1
Hi, some of you may know me as a veteran around the forums, some of you may not know me as a noob to this one. Noneintheless:


me and my friends plan on attempting to build a guitar. We will try to use a fairly standard design (not quite a strat, but basically a strat) for our first guitar.

I bought a book on this, and it said the neck angle & placement (if I'm not mistaken) was based on the height of the bridge, and then gave a table of measurements and such to use.


However, this leads me to this question:
Where do I measure the bridge from?

I wrote out a bunch of formulas and the designs all set except for the depth we need to cut out for the bridge, but I don't want it to be wrong because I don't know where to measure the bridge height from. So, any... knowleagable people wanna help?
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#2
Average value of the hight of the top of the saddles I believe (average of lowest and highest hight they can be, so as to allow maximum room roe adjustment).
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#3
Yeah, the tops of the saddles. And what kind of bridge are you using?
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#4
we're using a bridge from a no-name brand strat. lol all of our parts are cheap knock off for now, because this is the first one. We intend to save money on purchasing good parts when we've made a working guitar...
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

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it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#5
If it's a strat-style bridge (as opposed to a floyd rose or or tune-o-matic, etc.) neck angle isn't a big issue, you can get away with no neck angle quite well.
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#6
Quote by tubab0y
If it's a strat-style bridge (as opposed to a floyd rose or or tune-o-matic, etc.) neck angle isn't a big issue, you can get away with no neck angle quite well.


is there any reason for this except for that the strat bridge isn't intended as to be as 'floating' as the others?
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#7
I think it has to do with the angle of the strings...
I don't know about Floyds, but with a TOM, the strings are bent at such an angle from the tailpiece that they need an angled neck to provide enough pressure to keep the strings on the saddles.

With a Strat, the bridge has the strings at a much greater angle, providing enough pressure to keep the strings on the saddles.
#8
I thought it was because a TOM bridge is so tall, the action would be a mile high on a neck that's parallel to the body.

Guitars with trems, even floyds, mostly have parallel necks. Simply because they aren't very tall bridges.

I saw a diagram somewhere, I'll see if I can find it.
http://buildyourguitar.com/resources/tips/eangle.htm
Last edited by sashki at Oct 24, 2007,