#1
im thinking of getting a fretless squier jass bass and i was wondering do they sound different than fretted bass's?
#2
Yes.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#3
Fretlesses have been describes as having more of a "mwah" sound. You get a little bit of buzz from the fretboard, and a much warmer tone.
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Quote by Applehead
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Sex, pizza, the smell of fresh washing and slap bass.
#6
Fretless are a lot more mellow.
Gear:

Fender Mexi Fat Strat
2005 Taylor 614ce


Fender MIM J-Bass Fretless
#7
Real men play fretless basses.

Nah, but they are sweet. You have to focus a little more on intonation, but they feel nicer (to me) and they have a distinct tone that can be incorporated into a lot of things.
#9
Quote by Hergiswi
Real men play fretless basses.

No.
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They do sound different, you will also need to practice with your fretting hand more if you get one
I'll lay waiting, just waiting for my time to come
#11
Quote by Hergiswi
Real men play fretless basses.
.


But to quote the ol' Irish Spring commercial, "we women like 'em too"

Quote by Tallman
They are addictive. VERY addictive.


Yes its like playing without speed bumps (frets)! Once you get past the intonation issues (which still give me grief above the 14th fret), they are fun as hell. While they are great for fusion jazz, I've used mine lately to play funk ala Roccio Prestia of ToP. I love my Stingray FL.
#12
sorry for my retardation *borat* but i dont play bass.. how are you supposed to know where to play if there are no frets?
#15
To expound on that. Some have painted "frets" or are "lined". Some, like my Stingray are unlined, but have dot markers on the side of the neck indicating finger placement for correct intonation on the frets that usually have fret dots. Unlined fretless are a bear to learn intonation, but after a decent amount of practise over time, you gain enough muscle memory when playing that you are no longer dependent on looking at your fretting hand for correct position vis a vis the markers.
#16
I've been pulling off anything from funk to jazz to bluegrass to metal on mine lately. They're fun!
Gear:

Fender Mexi Fat Strat
2005 Taylor 614ce


Fender MIM J-Bass Fretless
#17
with a frettless your overtones are going to come in a a wave, so the note will not sound as broadly, it will peak instead, leaving a bit of a wearker attack (the mellow tones) and nice sloped off ending.

a fretted bass will give you much more punch, and i still believe should be your first choice, a frettless bass often doesnt punch through the mix unless you have a solid high end, which i've found many seem to lack. but thats just been my experience.

also, everyone wonders why their frettless doesnt have the jaco tone, and its a simple fix, get a chorus pedal. jaco was known to overdub tracks several times to create a chorus like effect, at least on weather report's and his solo's long sweepy bass lines like continuum and remark you made.

all our R&B songs are sounding nice with my frettless now, as anarkee saids, slides are a killer positive.
Quote by Mr. T
"Mr. T defines love as the reluctance to murder. If you're still alive, it's because Mr. T loves you."
#18
^ There's a lot more to the Jaco tone than a chorus pedal. I wrote a long blog about it.

Swat man, upright basses have no lines or dots. You need muscle memory and a good ear.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#20
Quote by thefitz
^ There's a lot more to the Jaco tone than a chorus pedal. I wrote a long blog about it.

Swat man, upright basses have no lines or dots. You need muscle memory and a good ear.


oh i realize that, his tone mostly comes from his technique. i had to study his playing a bit to pick up on all his little technical tendancies, but i was just saying for that last little 20% or so to achieving his tone can usually be done with a form of chorus.
Quote by Mr. T
"Mr. T defines love as the reluctance to murder. If you're still alive, it's because Mr. T loves you."
#21
Quote by crazypeanutman
oh i realize that, his tone mostly comes from his technique. i had to study his playing a bit to pick up on all his little technical tendancies, but i was just saying for that last little 20% or so to achieving his tone can usually be done with a form of chorus.

Please, check out the article. In my opinion, how much of his sound came from his technique is a little bit overrated. It wasn't that his fingers were physically special, it's that he knew what it took to get certain sounds from a certain bass, and if you read my article, you might figure out how, too.

Anyway, enough thread hijacking.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#22
Quote by thefitz
Please, check out the article. In my opinion, how much of his sound came from his technique is a little bit overrated. It wasn't that his fingers were physically special, it's that he knew what it took to get certain sounds from a certain bass, and if you read my article, you might figure out how, too.

Anyway, enough thread hijacking.



.........but i can get jaco's sound...
Quote by Mr. T
"Mr. T defines love as the reluctance to murder. If you're still alive, it's because Mr. T loves you."