#1
I haven't read any recently and could use a few suggestions. You guys have anything good to recommend that you guys have read recently?
#3
well what kind of books do you like first? that might help...

me personally, i like anything with sex, drugs, or violence (or gay people for some reason )
Quote by Guitar0player
You're Thurstonsexual

Happily E-Married to En_zed
The public doesn't want new music; the main thing that it demands of a composer is that he be dead.
-- Arthur Honegger

Enjoy reading? Please crit my work .
#4
Clive Barkers Weaveworld, I finished it lsat nite, great horror great thriller and a great concept it was a true epic.

Its about a carpet
Founder of the UG Church of Nihilists pm to join


Trust in me and fall aswell.
#6
Heart of Darkness, just read it. A bit complex but very good.
#7
Im reading Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk now. Its pretty good. If u like the movie fight club, I recommend it.
#8
A Short History of Tractors in the Ukrainian.


It's not about what you think it's about.
.Brand New.Bright Eyes.This Will Destroy You.

THRRRRRRRREADKILLER!
#9
I've just finished some Michael Connelly books... I've read pretty much all of them. They're amazing crime books.

Has anyone got any recommendations for me too? I'd like to read some more crime books.
Originally Posted by filthandfury

haha

I congratulate you good sir on being EPIC.
#11
Quote by frusciante_man1
I've just finished some Michael Connelly books... I've read pretty much all of them. They're amazing crime books.

Has anyone got any recommendations for me too? I'd like to read some more crime books.

"The Count of Monte Cristo" by Dumas
#12
Quote by denizenz
^ Dorian Gray for you then



???

I'm just about to start the third of the night watch books there 400% better than the films
Founder of the UG Church of Nihilists pm to join


Trust in me and fall aswell.
#14
Already read survivor and fight club. I'm looking more towards the existential reads. Also political and reads with underlying philosophical themes, not so much philosophical writings.
#15
What's with all these book threads all of a sudden?!?!


I never thought I'd have to mention the search bar in a thread about literature, but apparently it's come to that. o.O
#16
Quote by ThorMx
Already read survivor and fight club. I'm looking more towards the existential reads. Also political and reads with underlying philosophical themes, not so much philosophical writings.

Plato's "Republic"
"Logic" by Kant
"A treatise of human nature" by Hume
Locke's "Two Treatises of Government"
#17
Quote by yawn
What's with all these book threads all of a sudden?!?!


I never thought I'd have to mention the search bar in a thread about literature, but apparently it's come to that. o.O



1+

I just into reading myself again. Had a time when I didn't read a book for two years more or less.
#19
*Insert search bar joke here*

*leaves*

Chuck Palahnuik, James Patterson, John Grisham and Irvine Welsh are some of my favourite authors, check them out.
#20
Quote by denizenz
^ Dorian Gray for you then



sweet, i'll be sure to look into that this weekend...

thank you much
Quote by Guitar0player
You're Thurstonsexual

Happily E-Married to En_zed
The public doesn't want new music; the main thing that it demands of a composer is that he be dead.
-- Arthur Honegger

Enjoy reading? Please crit my work .
#21
Well, anyways, here are the books I suggest (copy/pasted):

Rites of Spring - Modris Eksteins

Fascinating book. Eksteins takes you throughout the the second World War and illuminates the era in such a powerful manner that you'll not want to stop reading. The abominable living conditions of militant life, the absolutely amazing event on one Christmas (or Christmas Eve?) that took place between the Allied and Axis troops, and the symbolic significance of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring ballet will all make this book an unforgettable experience.

Darkness at Noon - Arthur Koestler


A powerful novel about a political prisoner during the Russian Revolution. The twist? The prisoner is being imprisoned by his own party. As a member of the "Old Party", the "New Party" feels the necessity to silence and erase the existence of their political forefathers from whom their doctrines have shifted. Amazingly potent, and you'll feel an otherworldly sense of self at the end.

Their Eyes Were Watching God - Zora Neale Hurston

Very potent novel - almost epic in proportion - that follows through a woman's entire life, complete with several marriages and a flood of Biblical proportions at the end. It's a story that'll definitely intertwine with you the longer you read it.

A Yellow Raft in Blue Water - Michael Dorris

A truly epic novel that documents the life of a girl, then documents the life of that girl's mother, then documents the life of that mother's mother. With each new section, you'll learn a lot about the humane nature of narrative perspective, and with each preceding generation, an illuminating view of the generation it influenced. Very potent use of chronology.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy/The Restaurant at the End of the Universe/So Long and Thanks for All the Fish - Douglas Adams


You've heard the fanboys. They ain't kidding. This trilogy is thoroughly enjoyable and sharply potent as well. You'll be inundated with so many quotable lines that you'll eventually just find yourself immersed in a rich world of brilliant wit and admirable use of sarcasm.

Down and Out in Paris and London - George Orwell


Yeah, animal farm this and nineteen-eighty four that. Believe it or not, this guy actually wrote some other works as well! Aside from his brilliantly spot-on essay "Politics and the English Language" (READ IT!), another remarkably illuminating work of his is this documentary of living life in poverty in two cities - Paris and London. The lifestyle of the poor is almost epic in nature, complete with codes and doctrines of lifestyle that make it almost unbelievable that this novel is non-fictional. But it is, as justly likewise to Orwell's decision to live life in poverty so as to truly know the plight of the poor from a pure first-hand account.

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Another great Russian novel that details one day in the life of a political prisoner - this time in the context of a labor camp. It's short, so that should attract those of you with minimal attention spans.

The Gulag Archipelago: 1918-1956 - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

A very thorough documentary of that treacherous (and notorious) place in Russian history, known as the gulag archipelago. Solzhenitsyn himself had his own share of this place, and a plethora of other details and narratives were obtained from first-hand interviews with fellow Russian prisoners.

The Triumph and Tragedy of Lyndon Johnson - Joseph Califano


Bet ya never knew just how fascinating this American president was. Forget Lincoln and Kennedy - LBJ's life story is full of surprisingly human sentiment and a deep passion for the improvement of a nation who hated him because of a war started by his presidential predecessor. If you want to know just how excruciatingly difficult it is to be the big man in office, read this first-hand account.

What the Buddha Taught - Wapola Rahula


Lots of pseudo-intellectuals these days claim to be "Buddhist", but what does that really mean? This concise overview of the religion illuminates the most important concepts of a deeply powerful and potent lifestyle that could enhance anyone's function as both an individual and an extension of society.

The World’s Religions - Huston Smith

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Nothing has screwed this world over quite like religious ignorance and intolerance have, and, considering religion seems to be growing rather than declining on this planet, it's vital to have at least a basic understanding of the beliefs that dictate the lives of BILLIONS of people. Even if you're already religious, chances are you'll still learn a ton about your own religion, never mind the complete intellectual overhauls you'll receive from learning about the core principles and mandates of all others that you've thus far only learned about from the psychotic media world.

Shakedown: Exposing the Real Jesse Jackson - Kenneth R. Timmerman

Now, there's a good chance that bias played a huge role in the development of this exposition. Nonetheless, it's a VERY interesting read about a political figure who ruthlessly fought his way into fame and fortune, at the expense of both the people whom he fought for and the people whom he outwardly fought against. Seriously, you can't help but admire this guy's drive for getting what he wants, despite the nausea you'll feel from realizing how undeserving he is of what he's achieved. Well, some might say wit earns wealth. You decide. Either way, if you want to know how manipulation is done, read this.

Slaughterhouse-Five - Kurt Vonnegut

You've probably already read this. If not, you've probably at least heard about it from some raving fans. If not, you probably don't exist. Anyway, this is an immensely satisfying read by a brilliant wordsmith who unfortunately passed away just a couple of months ago. Chances are you'll want to check out other works by this author as well.

Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte


Some don't like this story and say it's too long. While it does seem a little overly lengthy, it's nonetheless an enjoyable read that follows a girl's entire life from childhood to marriage.

Notes From Underground - Fyodor Dostoevsky


The first literary work of existentialism! Wicked book that details three excruciatingly awkward life events in the life of an extremely socially maladaptive man. Three cheers for intellectual misanthropes!

The Stranger - Albert Camus


Hells yeah. Here's a story about a guy who feels no remorse when his mother dies and shoots an Arabian because the "sun" made him do it. If you're an apathetic individual, this is your life story. The ending reminds us of the danger of being too apathetic in an otherwise human society.

The Things They Carried - Tim O'Brien


This will no doubt leave a vividly lasting experience on you as a reader. The descriptive elements on this novel are painful, but colorfully alive and almost beautiful in their excessively grotesque nature. This is THE definitive statement of what war does to the individual. Facts no longer matter. The mind surrenders to the sensationalism of the ego, and the traumatic experiences of war are amplified to the post point of - well - syndrome. The stories documented in this literary jumble of reality and fiction are all real, as the fiction itself becomes reality.

Wiseblood - Flannery O'Connor

A story unlike any you've ever read. There is no protagonist, and there is no antagonist. There's just a mess of pseudo-hatred and facing authentic evil that combine to paint a vividly potent portrait of the grotesque side of life. Almost a caricature of real life, the characters of this novel will NOT leave you. Images of a boy in a gorilla suit will be with you, always.

First Confession - Monserrat Fontes


This is a remarkable story. Intensely dark, it follows the life-story of an anti-heroic girl and her emotionally weak friend whose actions lead to intense pain and suffering of others, including more than one occasion of death. Completing this story, you'll feel as if your life has somewhat changed, and you'll have a grander perspective on just how powerful life itself is. Very recommended.

The Importance of Being Earnest - Oscar Wilde

After all the heavy novels I've suggested thus far, here's a highly-likable lighthearted work of enjoyable satire that pokes fun at the excessive standards of society. Not really life-changing, but it'll nonetheless provide a satisfying read while potently poking fun at a few archetypes of modern society.

Sula - Toni Morrison

Very vulgar story about the life of a girl, and, by extension, her hometown, that details just how cruel society can be to itself. The protagonist is in many ways the antagonist, but it is this ambiguity that makes the story so beautiful and realistic. This story is unquestionably ugly, but it's an ugliness that's irresistible to read about. A very dynamic story as well.

Well, there goes about two hours of my day. o.O
Last edited by yawn at Oct 17, 2007,
#23
Plato's "Republic"
"Logic" by Kant
"A treatise of human nature" by Hume
Locke's "Two Treatises of Government"


That's what I mean by philosophical writings. I don't want books that put forth a philosophy and defend it. More so books that disguise different philosophies throughout the novel. I've read some of Nietzsche's books and they are overwhelming boring even though the content is rich.
#24
Quote by ThorMx
That's what I mean by philosophical writings. I don't want books that put forth a philosophy and defend it. More so books that disguise different philosophies throughout the novel. I've read some of Nietzsche's books and they are overwhelming boring even though the content is rich.

"Atlas Shrugged" ...
#25
Quote by denizenz
"Atlas Shrugged" ...


Ayn Rand is one of my favorites...

Quote by yawn
What's with all these book threads all of a sudden?!?!


I never thought I'd have to mention the search bar in a thread about literature, but apparently it's come to that. o.O


Better than a million threads about masturbation... this is actually a step forward for UG don't cha think?
Quote by Guitar0player
You're Thurstonsexual

Happily E-Married to En_zed
The public doesn't want new music; the main thing that it demands of a composer is that he be dead.
-- Arthur Honegger

Enjoy reading? Please crit my work .
#27
Quote by denizenz
I've not read any of her stuff. I've struggled through a bit of Leonard Peikoff's work, but I find objectivism to be an impossibility.


haha yeah its actually very sentimental for me, my grandmother and I read "fountainhead" over the summer before she passed away, so it fills me with good memories
Quote by Guitar0player
You're Thurstonsexual

Happily E-Married to En_zed
The public doesn't want new music; the main thing that it demands of a composer is that he be dead.
-- Arthur Honegger

Enjoy reading? Please crit my work .
#29
New Rules by Bill Maher.
Quote by Kensai
Forget about her, she seems complicated. Who wants a girl who answers in riddles? I'm not the fucking sfinx.

Quote by Rambo-Conny
Woah, woah. Back the hell up.

Polo shirt?

Sunglasses?

Of course he got all the girls, he's Rick Astley.
#30
'The Old Man and the Sea'- Hemingway
'Moby-Dick'- Herman Melville
'Crime and Punishment'- Dostoevsky
'Lolita'- Vladimir Nabokov
'A Confederate General From Big Sur'- Richard Brautigan
#31
Quote by x_thurston_x
Better than a million threads about masturbation... this is actually a step forward for UG don't cha think?
I do prefer literature threads to masturbation threads, but redundant threads still bug me regardless. ><
#32
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak has been one of my latest reads that I really enjoyed.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#33
Wilbur Smith, Bernard Cornwell or Robert Ludlum pretty much in that order are my favourites but depends what you are into...
Floyd Rose DST-2
Vox AD15VT
#34
"Sex, Drugs and Coccoa Puffs" by Klosterman
"If my baby don't love me no more,
well I'm sure her sister will." -Jimi "Red House"

Gear
1983 Strat '57 Reissue
1964 Gibson ES-330
Dr Z Maz 38
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