#1
I was thinking of getting the Line 6 toneport, the $200 version that has inputs for bass/guitar and mic.

but I wasn't really planning on using thier software program. so would I be better off just buying one of those input jacks that converts to USB instead?

I'm mostly looking to get this to simply put my songs down on something. I'm not in a band, so I would be doing the guitar & bass myself, maybe some lyrics and will most likely use software that can use some drums so at least there's something there!

also, if anyone has recommendations for software, that would be appreciated too.

thanks!
Jumping Jax Champion 1965!
#2
the zoom g2.1u has USB line in.. it also adds drum beats. I duno if it can record bass or microphone..
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- Gear -
ESP LTD MH-400
Epiphone Les Paul
Vox AD30VT
Zoom G2.1u
#3
In my opinion it's not worth getting the dual input one... the ux2

you just don't need it,
and if you don't plan on using the line 6 software that comes with it, no it's probably not worth it
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#4
I have a UX 1 and it's amazing. The UX2 isn't worth it unless you want dual vocals. I find the sofware that comes with it is alright if you're a beginner in the area of recording.
#5
BTW when I said the software I meant Gearbox, that thing is not bad

but the recording program they give you Ableton Live, I do not like that program
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#6
I have a UX2 and I love it. If you're not going to use any microphones in your recordings then the UX1 is a better bet. They both sound identical.
#7
guy, the most important feature on the UX2 is the phantom power, think about whether youll be recording much vocals and with what microphones youll be using before you choose
#8
Quote by juniorfr3ak
BTW when I said the software I meant Gearbox, that thing is not bad

but the recording program they give you Ableton Live, I do not like that program

what would you recommend then?
Jumping Jax Champion 1965!
#9
if you get a toneport use it for cubase or cool edit pro, you dont HAVE to use the software thats included with it
#10
As the poster above mentioned, you definitley don't have to use their packaged software. I started out using Guitarport with Audacity. Then ventured on to Cubase/SONAR. Plus there are plenty of free recording programs. I hear Reaper is pretty good.

Reaper - http://www.cockos.com/reaper/
#11
you should definately buy something else, cos you're pretty much bound to the software the toneport uses to proces your signal...for $200,- there's a lot more intereseting gadgets out there... check out the m-audio fasttrack usb if you dont want to spend muh money (about 120 bucks)...or go for the mackie onyx satellite, or the digidesign mbox mini..with the right software (which is free on the web if you know what i mean) you can get crazy guitarsounds...

i use the mackie with apple logic 8 pro..crazy sounds
#12
I haven't used the Toneport, but I do have the Zoom G2.1u that someone else mentioned, so I can comment on that. It is a little cheaper than what you quoted the Toneport (I think about $150).

The G2.1u is a modeling/multi-fx pedal that you can also use to record. So if you just want a recording interface, but plan on mic'ing your amp, then it's probably not for you. But if you want amp modeling, speaker simulation, etc. and effects for direct recording, this works well.

The pedal comes with Cubase LE software included, with instructions on how to get started. It was pretty easy. There are also preset patches that are set up specifically for recording (the settings are different depending if you want to record or play through an amp). I use the pitch shifter feature and a clean guitar setting, and by going down an octave, I get a pretty good bass sound.

The drum machine has I think 40 settings, none of which are great, but there are standard rhythms there. I usually pick a rhythm that is similar to what I want for my song, and record a "click track" of that rhythm at the desired tempo. Then I start recording guitar parts, and go back later and create the final drum tracks using the drum sounds on a keyboard. I find that I tend to get more dynamics than you get with the software drum programs, plus it seems like programming drums would be a pain.

For vocals, I run a condenser mic to a phantom power preamp, then the output of the preamp to the pedal. One good thing is that the reverb on the pedal works really nicely for vocals, it sounds much better than the reverb effect in the Cubase software. In general, I find that the effects provided by the pedal sound better than the software's effects.

Hope that is helpful.