#1
My guitar teacher told me today if would be ok to maybe practice only two-hand techniques and practice alternate picking for another week.
I have always practiced something of everything, and thought if I practice just one thing really well, I would get good at that thing but loose some talent in other thing, like practiceing sweeps for a week and get really good but loose some alternate picking? .

So, what sould I do?
The main purpose of a TV is to have a place to point your furnatures to
#2
It doesn't work that way. You don't "lose" anything, especially after only a week.
You'll always tend to retain the habits -- both good and bad -- you have practiced.

It's also really good to dive deep into one thing and work on it in detail. It's much
better getting really good in one thing, no matter how small, than being mediocre
at a lot of things.
#3
I don't think you'll lost anything if you go back to alternate picking the next week but I personally think alternate picking is so important it's too long to go a week without practicing it. If it was me I'd practice alternate picking every day and work on tapping every second or third day. All comes down to time and how you learn. Maybe your teacher feels you are really strong at alternate picking and you can afford to focus on other things. Just my two cents.
#4
Work on one or two things till you get great at them , then branch off, just make sure you do the other things somewhat. I got really good at alternate picking, now i'm gonna go into some more advanced legato stuff. I'm just trying to perfect everything basically. Get detailed.
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#5
I asked a similar question a few weeks ago here. I used to try and squeez (how the hell do you spell that ) every technique i could think of into each session. I found I wasn't progessing at all. The guys told me I should get good at alt picking and legato before moving on.

I just wish I had have asked before that summer I wasted
#6
how much time should you spend working on a specific technique per day? i want to practice dilligently but not over-do it.
#7
Quote by edg
It doesn't work that way. You don't "lose" anything, especially after only a week.
You'll always tend to retain the habits -- both good and bad -- you have practiced.

It's also really good to dive deep into one thing and work on it in detail. It's much
better getting really good in one thing, no matter how small, than being mediocre
at a lot of things.


+1 million. the godhonest truth here. i recommend going in circles spend a week or 2 on one thing, then another week or 2 on the next and continue on until you're back where you started. you may FEEL like you're playing worse than when you finished before but chances are you really aren't (you may not be playing as fast as you were, but you'll be playing as fast as you can comfortably which is the most important part)

edit:

i do still recommend "practicing" your other techniques that you were previously working on, chances are you're not going to sit there for 4 hours straight JUST sweep picking or whatever you're working on. when you're done practicing on your core technique go back and play and enjoy being able to play and incorporate some of the things you have been working on be it string skipping, tapping, sweeping or whatever, incorporate that into your music (and as always dont go faster than what you can do cleanly) and find ways to use what you've already learned and apply them in a musical manner. most importantly, have fun
Last edited by z4twenny at Oct 19, 2007,
#8
^+1 BILLION!

I mean, take a look at the concept I've come up with for my own practice regiment on my blogs. That has gotten me further this month on several things than I have on 1 thing in the last year or two .
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

┌∩┐(◣_◢)┌∩┐

DO NOT CLICK HERE!
#9
what if you practice different exercises for the same technique? will you still see progress?
#12
Quote by Blackout826
what if you practice different exercises for the same technique? will you still see progress?


yes you will, in differing opinion with spamwise though i think you will see more progress but i think it will come a little slower. don't let that stop you though.
#13
i see your point, if you practice a whole bunch of different sweeping exercises. 3 finger sweeps, 5 finger, sweep runs, with tapping. etc

it would make sense you'll get better at everything.
#14
As for varying exercises for a single technique, it can only help. Take an extreme example, someone who practices sweep picked arpeggios exclusively for hours a day, will be very good at sweeped arpeggios and probably half decent at most other stuff, but someone who practices every technique known to man, obviously for less time per technique - well I'm sure nobody would argue who the better technician would be.

Really, I sometimes read in here of people who believe that 'X' amount of practice will make them a good musician. While I'm not arguing against practice, and lots of it, I do believe that music is an art form and at some point your technical skill should become insignificant in comparison to your artistic creativity. Just my opinion, for what it's worth.
#16
While I don't disagree, what I was trying to say is that "absolute technical freedom" as you put it, is an impossible ideal and that at some point artistic impression should be a priority. Again, this is just an opinion of mine and I'm not suggesting that technical mastery is a waste of time, just that it shouldn't be placed above what you're doing with the technique.
#17
I don't think you can say that creativity is more important than technical ability or vice versa. Creative ability is a must, but without technical ability you wouldn't be able to put any of those creative thoughts into fruition; and if you just had great technical ability and no creative ability, your playing would lack substance and be boring.