#1
Hi, I've been having this problem for a while. I've tried changing my tone entirely (I mostly play through an Epiphone Elitist with stock pickups into a Roland Cube-30, not pedals), I've tried adjusting the volume knob on the guitar, and still when I play, strings ring out that shouldn't. I do stand close to the amp, but I'm not really in a position to back away. Does anyone know what the problem could be?

On a related note, when I do bends, frequently the skin of my finger will catch the next string and cause it to ring out (I'm aware of that much and I consider this a seperate problem from the one above). Especially in solos, sometimes my fingers traveling across multiple strings on the same fret and then releasing can cause a problem. Is there a good way to avoid this? I've tried applying less pressure, but then they just end up muted.

For both of these problems I'm ready to buy new pickups, go back to basics with a metronome (which I've already tried, actually), whatever I have to do to get rid of them and finally hear myself playing as clearly as I'd like. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
#2
Its definitely not the pickups, I would stand as far away from the amp as I can and double check my technique to make sure your not doing by accident.

The bend is a technique problem, everyone I know that plays guitar has it. just try to push the other stings up with the bend, it will help mute them, make sure you don't go over or under the strings.

Edit: if you can't move away from the amp, turn it around or something.
Last edited by Zofar at Oct 18, 2007,
#3
The strings ringing out isn't a pick-up problem, for sure. Make sure all the strings are muted when you're playing by resting your palm on the strings you're not playing. The bending is a different thing entirely. Try to push the other strings up with the one you're already bending, keeping them muted.

If none of this works, then buy weaker pick-ups.
#4
use your right hand or the thumb of your right hand to mute whatever's ringing out that shouldn't. think sweep picking, usually when im giong fast if i dont use that hand to mute, it causes unintentional pulloffs so that usually solves the problem.
#5
^^^ this guy Zofar here is a smart man.
listen to what he's saying.


when you're bending, get only the tip of your finger on the string and push up.
if its a full bend or more, then do what he said and press your finger up against the string above (or below) while holding your bend and the string won't ring.

as for the ring out problem.
is your tailpiece.....not a piece of ****? just wondering, bad quality bridges = **** overall.
maybe the strings just need a good stretching.
if that's the case (which im thinking it is) then take each string one by one, slip your finger
under it, and pull straight up.
now don't be a jackass and pull ungodly hard, because then you'll obviously snap it and have it hit you in the face most likely causing the pain.
so pull it up a good 2 or 3 inches about 5 times each string 3 times all the way through.
tune it back up (its gonna go out of tune bending it up) play until your done for then, bend em again, optional tune again, put it away/down.

DurpeeEdit:

I would just recommend getting a new guitar entirely if you can.

and zoro, nice ****ing guitarage, ..... on the amps lol
Last edited by MrDURPEEDURP at Oct 18, 2007,
#6
^

the guitar won't have a shotty bridge, its an epiphone elitist.
#7
Hi there!

From over here, it sounds like it's a technique thing. This is actually good! You won't have to buy any new gear! And it will present you with an opportunity to learn more about the guitar, your playing style, yadda yadda yadda.

You'll want to apply both left and right hand muting (resting your hands on the strings), and of course, being aware of what's going on with your playing.

Again, I could be misinterpreting what your question was, but it does sound like it's not gear related. (Now you can save up for that super duper five neck guitar that plays "stairway to heaven" by itself....!)

Best of luck,
Josh
www.joshurban.blogspot.com
#8
Thanks for the help! I'm glad to hear most of you don't think it's the equipment. I'll try turning the amp around, and if that still doesn't work, I'll work on the muting techniques you guys suggested. Would you guys recommend I set my metronome to slow and then work on it there, or is there a better strategy? I looked for an article on the main ultimate guitar site that might teach a good technique to teach yourself this stuff, but I didn't find one.
#9
Play things cleanly and slowly. This is way better for you in the long run. If you can play something cleanly at a slow speed, then you will eventually be able to play it cleanly at a faster speed. Don't just try to kill yourself right off the bat and play it as fast as you can. It'll just be sloppy.

Speed is a byproduct of accuracy.
#10
Quote by Serendipity
Play things cleanly and slowly. This is way better for you in the long run. If you can play something cleanly at a slow speed, then you will eventually be able to play it cleanly at a faster speed. Don't just try to kill yourself right off the bat and play it as fast as you can. It'll just be sloppy.

Speed is a byproduct of accuracy.


Thanks for the advice. I'll glady spend a month playing slow clean stuff if it helps my playing in the long run.
#11
Quote by Reeven
Thanks for the advice. I'll glady spend a month playing slow clean stuff if it helps my playing in the long run.

Aye, if you can't get a riff or whatever, just practice it slowly. Gradually speed it up, and this will imprint it in your muscle memory. Then you can freak out AND play it cleanly. Sweet!
#12
Quote by Serendipity
Aye, if you can't get a riff or whatever, just practice it slowly. Gradually speed it up, and this will imprint it in your muscle memory. Then you can freak out AND play it cleanly. Sweet!


I'll be playing primarily with distortion, but do you think when I'm going slow I should practice without? I'm actually thinking with distortion, because then I'll hear the other strings ringing out easier.
#13
Also, what volume should the knobs on my guitar be set to ideally?
#14
Quote by Reeven
Also, what volume should the knobs on my guitar be set to ideally?

10 would be ideal, most guitarist have their volume at 10 almost all the time and then adjust their tone with the amp. if you want to get a cleaner tone while using distortion however, its good to be able to roll off some volume to clean it up a bit.
#15
Quote by Zofar
10 would be ideal, most guitarist have their volume at 10 almost all the time and then adjust their tone with the amp. if you want to get a cleaner tone while using distortion however, its good to be able to roll off some volume to clean it up a bit.


Good. My higher strings sound really bad when the volume is much lower than 8, especially when muted. Makes solos sound like garbage.

I tried playing my usual speed for a bit and just focusing on muting as a base run, and no suprise it didn't cut it. Later today I'm going to go back and slow it way down. Anyone know any good exercizes that involve lots of bending and string skipping? The second solo from '3's and 7's' by Queens of the Stone Age seems to have lots of problem areas for me to practice, also the 'Thunderstruck' solo by AC/DC.
#16
Quote by Reeven
I'll be playing primarily with distortion, but do you think when I'm going slow I should practice without? I'm actually thinking with distortion, because then I'll hear the other strings ringing out easier.


Bump, if anyone could answer this. I've been trying to practice with distortion and it's really frustrating. Strings I'm not even near will start ringing out. I'm also still not sure how to bend without hitting the string above. I've tried a bunch of different ways and none seem to be doing the trick.
#17
Quote by Reeven
Bump, if anyone could answer this. I've been trying to practice with distortion and it's really frustrating. Strings I'm not even near will start ringing out. I'm also still not sure how to bend without hitting the string above. I've tried a bunch of different ways and none seem to be doing the trick.

By cleanly, I mean without slop: as in, nothing sounds but the note(s) you want to sound. Channel-wise, I would practice with both a clean tone and a distorted tone. Clean tones allow your dynamics to show (as well as missed or unsync'd notes), and distortion will amplify string noise so you'll know when it happens.

Regarding string bending, practice slowly. I used to have the same problem when I started playing. Use the fingers in front of the finger you're using to bend and mute unwanted strings. For instance, for a bend using my ring finger, I'd use the ring finger to bend the string, the middle finger both to bend the string I want to bend and to slightly bend the string above it (if bending upwards) to move it out of the way, and the index to mute the strings around the string that I intend to bend. It's kinda in a barre position. Hope that helps.
#18
Quote by Serendipity
By cleanly, I mean without slop: as in, nothing sounds but the note(s) you want to sound. Channel-wise, I would practice with both a clean tone and a distorted tone. Clean tones allow your dynamics to show (as well as missed or unsync'd notes), and distortion will amplify string noise so you'll know when it happens.

Regarding string bending, practice slowly. I used to have the same problem when I started playing. Use the fingers in front of the finger you're using to bend and mute unwanted strings. For instance, for a bend using my ring finger, I'd use the ring finger to bend the string, the middle finger both to bend the string I want to bend and to slightly bend the string above it (if bending upwards) to move it out of the way, and the index to mute the strings around the string that I intend to bend. It's kinda in a barre position. Hope that helps.


I'll give that a shot, sounds like it should work. Thanks!