#1
Ok, I am typing this as I read the FAQ on Theory, and using my guitar to try what I am interpreting from that...

I am playing a C Major scale....up and down...In the Key of C (dont ask me why I am spelling it all out, if I am careful the key confuses me)

C D E F G A B

I am fine with this...understand it upside down and sideways...as long as I can find the C not anywhere on the fretboard I can figure out where the major scale goes...whether it be up the A sting....or starting on the A string going up the other strings...or down... I understand that concept...

(Just to make sure I played it in a few places before I typed this)

Now....:: sigh ::...modes...

The scale itself is an ionian mode...I understand that

(reads from the faq)
Now... for Dorian... the scale starts in D and runs the same

D E F G A B C

Phyrgian starts with E.... and ascends just the same

E F G A B C D

Etc. etc, all for the different modes of the C major scale....right?

------

Let me try that with something else... the A Major...which runs:

A B C# D E F G#

okay, so that I dont confuse myself... im going to do this scale in Dorian... we start with D and use the formula...right?

D E F G A B C... wait wtf?

D...

screw it i give up...someone fill in the blanks and hopefully it will click...

what i was trying to do above was list the notes when playing A Major in Dorian mode...
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#2
You're right with the one in C. The key of A maj. has an F# though, not just F. when you play through the modes like I think you were, one after the next, they dont really sound different, at least to me. I've heard this metaphor and think it works pretty well. "Using modes is like looking at a piece of art from a different angle, your looking at the same thing, but it might have a different feel." To extend this I think some angles or modes work better at certain times than others, as far as when, im trying to figure that out myself. Basically I think you should play one or maybe a few of the modes when you are jamming along to a song or something. Just start with the key of the song and use the modes that go off of that particular key.
#3
modes are basically just starting the scale on a different note. when you play the a major scale, no matter what mode, its always the same notes. it sjust starts on a different note in each mode
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#4
Good on you for reading the sticky!

STANDARD RESPONSE TO MODES THREADS FOLLOWS

Okay, a mode of the major scale contains the same notes as the major scale, but the root is a different note. This is just explaining where modes come from, but I don't think of them like this when actually using them.
D Ionian (major) is D E F# G A B C#
E Dorian (second mode) is E F# G A B C# D
A mixolydian (fifth mode) is A B C# D E F# G
They contain the same notes but start on different root notes.

So, they contain the same notes but they are definately different scales. I think of modes as alterations to the major scale.
Ionian (Major) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
Phrygian 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7
Mixolydian 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
Aeolian (Natural Minor) 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7

So, for F Phrygian you start with the F major scale, F G A Bb C D E
Then flatten the 2 3 6 and 7 to get 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
And you end up with the notes F Gb Ab Bb C Db Eb.

Now, when playing modes over chords, look at the intervals making up the chord and the intervals making up the mode. If they match up, they will sound good together.
Say a Cm chord comes up, thats 1 b3 5. Look at the modes and you see that Dorian, Phrygian and Aeolian all contain those intervals.
So you could play C Dorian, C Phrygian or C Aeolian, which one you chose will give a different feel.
Now if an Amaj7 comes along, thats 1 3 5 7. Compare that to the modes and you see that you can play A Ionian or A Lydian, againg giving different feels.
What about a Bbm7b5? You see that the only mode with 1 b3 b5 b7 is Locrian, so you can play Bb Locrian
With an E7 (1 3 5 b7) you find that only Mixolydian fits, so you can play E mixolydian

JohnlJones Jazz-Theory Bit:
With that E7 you could play E Phrygian, with the b3 funtioning as a #2, to outline an altered dominant chord.
E7 - 1 3 4 b7
E Phrygian 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
This gives the intervals 1 b2 #2 3 4 5 b6 b7 which is a _11b9#9b13 chord.

Remember none of this is law, it's just a guide so don't be afraid to experiment.
Hope this helps

The way to use modes and get their different sounds is to think of the intervals it is made up of. Phrygian has a b2, a dark, dissononant interval. Lydian has a #4, which sounds... I dunno how to describe it but it sounds cool. Mixolydian is like the major scale but has a b7, making it bluesy and dominant.

Just drone the low E string, keep it ringing (clean setting works best). Then on the remaining five stings, play E Phrygian, E lydian, E Aeloian, E Ionian etc. and emphasise the unique intervals in each. Really listen to each scales' characteristics. Try making a melody from each mode while droning the E string.

Once you have done this, watch this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWHKeC4IEgA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoGQ9yHOyZQ
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#5
Ok, I started to understand as I woke up this morning and started to read over the replies..

but then Ænimus Prime stated that the modes just start with a different note, and end on that same note, following the same notes of the scale.

but then later he goes down to talking about flattening or sharpening the notes?

Don't get me wrong, this is getting me very close to understanding.. I know that if I take any major scale, I can use the different modes simply by starting with a different root note. but then again he says that I have to change the notes?

Do I start with that note, and change the following notes?
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#6
Quote by Zatchel
Ok, I started to understand as I woke up this morning and started to read over the replies..

but then Ænimus Prime stated that the modes just start with a different note, and end on that same note, following the same notes of the scale.

but then later he goes down to talking about flattening or sharpening the notes?

Don't get me wrong, this is getting me very close to understanding.. I know that if I take any major scale, I can use the different modes simply by starting with a different root note. but then again he says that I have to change the notes?

Do I start with that note, and change the following notes?


No, you do not change following notes.

This 1 b2 b3...,(it's called intervals) shows how different is D Dorian from D Major (Ionian).

So formula for the Major scale is basis:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7.

So:

D Major: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7
         D  E F#  G  A  B  C#

D Dorian: 1  2 b3  4  5  6 b7
          D  E  F  G  A  B  C


3=F#, b3=F
7=C#, b7=C

in this example.

Capisce?
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#7
Yes it is confusing, but (I think) the definition of a mode is a scale that contains all the same notes as some other scale. Wow, thats great, but it doesn't help in actually understanding how to use them.

I'm going to have to do some work on my standard reesponse, because I realised that I don't quite use modes as I said.

I actually don't think of them as alterations to the major scale, but as individual collections of intervals. If I want to play D mixolydian, I will play the intervals 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7, with D as the root note. This requires an understanding of how intervals relate to each other, and how they work on the fretboard.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#8
MT FAQ - Intervals is necessary to understand modes completely.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.